We are currently in Beta version and updating this search on a regular basis. We’d love to hear your feedback here.

  1. ArchDaily
  2. Transit Infrastructure

Transit Infrastructure: The Latest Architecture and News

"Our Cities are not Designed for the Disabled" According to CityLab

Although disability laws have been put in place decades ago, architects are still struggling with disability requirements. A recent article by CityLab explored how the rise of speed and efficiency-driven cities have overlooked accessibility, neglecting the needs of people who are physically unable to live or keep up with these dense neighborhoods. And while the "15-Minute City", one that allows people to walk or bike to most essential services within 15 minutes of their home, may seem as the future of built environments, it does not cater to disabled individuals or their movements.

© Aitor OrtizCourtesy of Ciclo Vivo© Shutterstock© Arup+ 4

10 Cities Embracing Bicycles in their Urban Planning

What does the future of cities and transportation look like? It looks like the future will run on two wheels and a handle bar. Many explain the rise of cyclists as a shift towards a healthier and more economical lifestyle. But while that may be true, why would individuals feel inclined to ride bicycles if the roads don't support it, or if there weren't adequate spaces to park?

Architecture plays an important role in promoting the use of bicycles. Cities equipped with safe bicycle lanes, parking lots, and public bike facilities encourage citizens to refrain from using their cars, and opt for a much more sustainable means of transportation. Many have already began reshaping their urban infrastructure in a way that caters to bicycles, whether it is through bicycle bridges, widened cycling lanes, or permanent parking lots.

Strawinskylaan Bicycle Parking / wUrck. Image © Jan de VriesLex van Delden Bridge / Dok Architecten. Image © Arjen SchmitzDenmark Pavilion, Shanghai Expo 2010 / BIG. Image © Iwan BaanThe South Entrance / Tengbom. Image © Felix Gerlach+ 15

The World’s Longest Immersed Road and Rail Tunnel, between Denmark and Germany, Receives Green Light

The world’s longest immersed road and rail tunnel design, the Fehmarnbelt link gets a go-ahead. The 18 km infrastructure, the longest of its kind, connecting Denmark’s Lolland Falster region with Germany’s Schleswig Holstein region across the Baltic Sea will shorten the journey between both countries to just 10 minutes by car and seven minutes by train.

Courtesy of Femern A/SCourtesy of Femern A/SCourtesy of Femern A/SCourtesy of Femern A/S+ 8

Zaha Hadid Architects and A-Lab Share Designs for Norway's Fornebubanen Metro Line

Zaha Hadid Architects and A-Lab have been announced the winner of a competition to design two new metro stations in Oslo. The stations, Fornebu Senter and Fornbuporten, are to be part of Oslo's new Fornebubanen line, connecting a major existing rail interchange to the Fornebu Senter, a major shopping center in the city.

Fornebu Senter Station West Entrance. Image © VA, Courtesy of Zaha Hadid ArchitectsFornbuporten Station. Image © VA, Courtesy of Zaha Hadid ArchitectsFornebu Senter Station Platforms. Image © VA, Courtesy of Zaha Hadid ArchitectsFornebu Senter Station West; East Entrances. Image © VA, Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects+ 13

High Speed Rail in the US: Myth or Near-Future Possibility?

In Europe, Asia and much of the developed world, high speed rail is convenient and accessible. Whether for business or pleasure, travelers are served by an efficient and extensive rail network that connects passengers to the desired destination on time and with relatively little effort. Although these train systems can travel as fast as 350 kilometers per hour, speed is not the only important factor. Rail stations in Europe, for example, are an integral part of the historic urban fabric. These facilities are often perceived as civic destinations that play a fundamental role in the mobility system, providing a wide range of services for the larger collective; shopping, entertainment, commercial and civic uses are often paired with transit services as new stations are built and historic stations are retrofitted.