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Interviews: The Latest Architecture and News

Erieta Attali: "I Create Images That Capture an Identity of Place"

10:32 - 19 August, 2019
Erieta Attali: "I Create Images That Capture an Identity of Place", Max Nunez, Nicolas del Rio, House in Portillo, Chile. Image © Erieta Attali
Max Nunez, Nicolas del Rio, House in Portillo, Chile. Image © Erieta Attali

Architecture is mostly known through representations. Even today, when traveling is no longer rare or just for the rich, buildings and places are mostly disseminated and appreciated through images. In that sense, photography has been—and still is—paramount to architecture. The following interview delves into Erieta Attali’s work and the relationship to both architecture and landscape through the lens of her camera. With over two decades of experience, shooting and teaching all over the world, the Israeli photographer reflects on the origins and evolution of her renown practice.

Stéphane Beel on Architecture and Technology

21:00 - 20 July, 2019
Stéphane Beel on Architecture and Technology, Courtesy of Stéphane Beel Architects
Courtesy of Stéphane Beel Architects

Past, Present, Future is an interview project by Itinerant Office, asking acclaimed architects to share their perspectives on the constantly evolving world of architecture. Each interview is split into three video segments: Past, Present, and Future, in which interviewees discuss their thoughts and experiences of architecture through each of those lenses. The first episode of the project featured 11 architects from Italy and the Netherlands and Episode II is comprised of interviews with 13 architects from Spain, Portugal, France, and Belgium.

The goal of the series is to research these successful firms and attempt to understand their methods and approaches. By hopefully gaining a clearer picture of what it means to be an architect in the 21st century, the videos can also serve as inspiration for the next generation of up-and-coming architects and students as they enter the field.

Courtesy of Stéphane Beel Architects Courtesy of Stéphane Beel Architects Courtesy of Stéphane Beel Architects Courtesy of Stéphane Beel Architects + 28

"We Can Find Ways for Buildings to Talk to Each Other": In Conversation with Eran Chen

04:00 - 17 July, 2019
"We Can Find Ways for Buildings to Talk to Each Other": In Conversation with Eran Chen, By Imagen Subliminal. Image © ODA Architecture
By Imagen Subliminal. Image © ODA Architecture

By Pavel Bendov. Image © ODA Architecture By Forbes Massie. Image © ODA Architecture By Pavel Bendov. Image © ODA Architecture By Imagen Subliminal. Image © ODA Architecture + 39

New York-based architect Eran Chen (b. 1970) was born and grew up in Be'er Sheva, Israel where his Polish-born grandparents, Holocaust survivors, settled right after World War Two. Early on the original long Polish surname was abbreviated to short Chen, which is pronounced “Khen.” In Hebrew, it stands for charm. After four years in the army, following high school, Chen studied architecture at the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem, the top architecture school in the country. Upon graduation in 1999, he ventured to New York to gain professional experience. He was hired by Perkins Eastman, a global New York-based giant of over 1,000 architects. In just a few years Chen was made the youngest principal in the company to oversee the design of his own diverse projects, including several competition-winning entries. By then he got married, became a father, a licensed architect, and settled in the city that he now calls home. In 2007, Chen decided to strike on his own. He focused on working with developers on residential projects, mainly in New York, as well as other major cities in the US and around the world. Many of Chen’s projects are situated in dense urban places. They are about reinventing the familiar living typology of buildings as extruded boxes. We met at the architect’s busy Manhattan office of over 100 young, ambitious architects helping Chen to make our cities more livable. We discussed his concept of vertical urban village and the truly democratic idea that every apartment, no matter where it is positioned in the building, can be turned into a penthouse.  

“Buildings Have their own Philosophical Backgrounds”: In Conversation with Nikoloz Lekveishvili and Natia Lekveishvili of TIMM Architecture, Tbilisi, Georgia

08:00 - 29 June, 2019
“Buildings Have their own Philosophical Backgrounds”: In Conversation with Nikoloz Lekveishvili and Natia Lekveishvili of TIMM Architecture, Tbilisi, Georgia, © TIMM. COMPETITION FRANCE - Young Architects Competition - Mothe Chandenier – France 2019
© TIMM. COMPETITION FRANCE - Young Architects Competition - Mothe Chandenier – France 2019

© TIMM. Esta Sales Office (in progress) – Istanbul, Turkey 2017 © TIMM. Rike Information Center (Competition entry 2 nd prize) – Tbilisi, Georgia 2019 © TIMM. Market + Office tower (stayed as a proposal) – Izmir, Turkey 2016 © TIMM. SALES OFFICE 1 (in progress) – Istanbul, Turkey 2017 + 48

Nikoloz Lekveishvili (b. 1986), originally from Tbilisi, Georgia, has left his country in 2004 for his bachelor studies to Istanbul Mimar Sinan Fine Arts University and to get Master of Architecture at Politecnico Di Milano. He then practiced architecture in Italy, Germany, Turkey, and India until 2017, when he was attracted back to his home country by emerging economic opportunities and bustling creative scene in this former Soviet republic in the Caucasus. Nikoloz has started his practice, TIMM Architecture the same year together with his younger sister, Natia Lekveishvili (b. 1989) who has graduated from Georgian Technical University in 2012 and worked in local architectural and design-build firms.

The partners’ studio is located in the heart of old Tbilisi in the same building where their parents, architecture professors and practitioners, lead their own research-based office known for documenting historical monuments in the region. We met with Nikoloz and Natia at their studio which also serves as an architectural salon where young architects and students are welcome. In the following conversation, the architects spoke about a journey of emotions, transitioning from light to darkness, being interested in Kintsugi, traces of time, treating buildings like human beings, and of the importance of being selfish in order to create architecture that’s unique and personal.

The Importance of Communication and Context in Enrique Sobejano's Work

08:30 - 28 June, 2019
The Importance of Communication and Context in Enrique Sobejano's Work, Espacio Andaluz de Creación Contemporánea. Image © Roland Halbe
Espacio Andaluz de Creación Contemporánea. Image © Roland Halbe

Past, Present, Future is an interview project by Itinerant Office, asking acclaimed architects to share their perspectives on the constantly evolving world of architecture. Each interview is split into three video segments: Past, Present, and Future, in which interviewees discuss their thoughts and experiences of architecture through each of those lenses. The first episode of the project featured 11 architects from Italy and the Netherlands and Episode II is comprised of interviews with 13 architects from Spain, Portugal, France, and Belgium.

Konigshof rendering. Image Courtesy of Nieto Sobejano Arquitectos Montblanc exterior view. Image Courtesy of Nieto Sobejano Arquitectos Espacio Andaluz de Creación Contemporánea. Image © Roland Halbe Arvo Part Centre. Image © Roland Halbe + 41

Thomas Fisher on The Ethics of Architecture and Other Contradictions

04:00 - 21 June, 2019
Thomas Fisher on The Ethics of Architecture and Other Contradictions, © Thomas Hawk/Flickr
© Thomas Hawk/Flickr

This article was originally published on Common Edge.

Why don’t architects often consider the ethics of what they do? Thomas Fisher’s new book, The Architecture of Ethics, digs into this topic in great depth and with engaging insight. At the recent AIA convention in Las Vegas, I sat down with Fisher—former dean of the University of Minnesota College of Design, and now a professor in urban design at the school, as well as director of the Minnesota Design Center—to talk about his book and the ethical dimension of designing and building in the context of contemporary practice.

“One Day All the Dreamers Will Get Together to Build a Fantastic World”: In Conversation with Massimiliano and Doriana Fuksas

07:00 - 29 May, 2019
“One Day All the Dreamers Will Get Together to Build a Fantastic World”: In Conversation with Massimiliano and Doriana Fuksas, Museum of Graffiti. Image © Aki Furudate
Museum of Graffiti. Image © Aki Furudate

© Archivio Fuksas. ImageShenzhen Airport © Archivio Fuksas. ImageRhike Park in Tbilisi New Rome EUR. Image © Leonardo Finotti © Studio Fuksas. ImageNew Milan Trade Fair + 15

Italian architects Massimiliano and Doriana Fuksas were both born and grew up in Rome. Both graduated from La Sapienza University – he in 1969, she a decade later. He started his studies as a painter, she initially persued the history of art. In the early 60s, Massimiliano assisted Giorgio De Chirico and after graduation worked for Archigram in London and then for Henning Larsen and Jørn Utzon in Copenhagen. He started his first practice, the GRANMA in 1967. Doriana joined him in 1985 and became an equal partner in 1997. Subsequent offices were opened in Paris (1989) and in Shenzhen (2004). In 2000, Massimiliano Fuksas served as the Director of the 7th Venice Architecture Biennale under the theme "Less Aesthetics, More Ethics." The duo’s most recognized built works include Museum of Graffiti in Ariege, France; Shenzen Bao'an International Airport; EUR Convention Centre in Rome; New Milan Trade Fair, Rho-Pero; Zenith Music Hall in Strasbourg; and Peres Peace House in Jaffa, Tel Aviv. I met with the architects during their recent visit to New York where so far, they completed only one project, Armani 5th Avenue Flagship Store. We discussed how they start again with every project, their preoccupation with the future, and why buildings should try to become something else.

Total Chaos 2019: A Space to Learn and Connect Architecture with the 3D Visualization World

04:30 - 28 May, 2019

Last week, Chaos Group returned to Bulgaria presenting the latest and most innovative within the world of technology and visualization through the Total Chaos 2019 conference. With more than 50 specialists in the field, the event was divided into a series of talks and masterclasses where ArchDaily had the opportunity to participate to cover what was a remarkably enriching instance for all those involved in the world of architecture and the creative industry.

In this second version, Total Chaos provided a shared space for 3D artists and developers to connect and grow, as they explore how topics like AI, real-time ray tracing, light fields and collaborative VR will continue to change professional workflows. 

“As Architects, We Should Be Confident in Our Work”: In Conversation with Weiping Shao of Beijing Institute of Architectural Design and UFo

08:00 - 11 May, 2019
“As Architects, We Should Be Confident in Our Work”: In Conversation with Weiping Shao of Beijing Institute of Architectural Design and UFo, © Wu Jiming
© Wu Jiming

© Wu Jiming © Fu Xing © Fu Xing © Fu Xing + 39

Contemporary Chinese architects can be divided into two main categories. One is a huge network of government and university-owned design institutes and the other –independent, privately-run architects’ studios, a phenomenon that was started by Beijing-based architect Yung Ho Chang when he opened the very first such practice in 1993. While it is these independent architects that succeeded in producing many, mostly small-scale original works that collectively established a new architectural identity that is unmistakably Chinese, it is the design institutes that produce the greatest bulk of the built environment in the country. For this reason, I wanted to talk to Weiping Shao, the Chief Executive Architect of the Beijing Institute of Architectural Design, BIAD. In a way, Mr. Shao is the chief architect of the Chinese capital. He also serves as the Executive Director of the Architectural Society of China. Shao graduated from Tongji University in Shanghai in 1984 with a master’s degree. Apart from heading BIAD’s design efforts, the architect is the head and leading designer of his 30-architect studio called UFo, which was founded in 2003. We met at Shao’s office, full of international magazines and with an expansive view over Downtown Beijing and spoke with the help of translator and architect Zewo Zhou who works at the studio.

Changing Metaphors: an Interview between Ory Dessau and Zvi Hecker

08:00 - 4 May, 2019
Changing Metaphors: an Interview between Ory Dessau and Zvi Hecker , Palmach Museum of History, Tel Aviv, Israel, 1993- 1997. Courtesy of Zvi Hecker Architect. Image © Michael Krüger
Palmach Museum of History, Tel Aviv, Israel, 1993- 1997. Courtesy of Zvi Hecker Architect. Image © Michael Krüger

The conversation with renowned architect and artist Zvi Hecker (born 1931) followed Crusaders Come and Go, his exhibition at Galerie Nordenhake, Berlin (June-July 2017). In the first part, Hecker introduces his historical critique of the Modernist turn in architecture and its effect on city planning. He points out the tension between an urbanistic approach and approach which focuses on the impact of the single building. In the second part, Hecker tackles the notion of the architect’s style and positions his work against or in distance to the endeavor of cultivating a stylistic signature. In the last part, Hecker elaborates on a recurring motif in his work, the motive of the open book as a symbol, concept and formal dynamic reference.

"For Us, Every Project is About Moving Forward": In Conversation with Jason Forney, Jason Jewhurst, and Dana Kelly of Bruner/Cott Architects

10:00 - 28 April, 2019
"For Us, Every Project is About Moving Forward": In Conversation with Jason Forney, Jason Jewhurst, and Dana Kelly of  Bruner/Cott Architects, Hampshire College R.W. Kern Center - Photo by Robert Benson
Hampshire College R.W. Kern Center - Photo by Robert Benson

MASS MoCA Building 6 - Photo by Michael Moran MASS MoCA Building 6 - Photo by Michael Moran MASS MoCA Building 6 - Photo by Michael Moran MASS MoCA Building 6 - Photo by Michael Moran + 50

Established in 1973 by Simeon Bruner and Leland (Lee) Cott, Bruner/Cott Architects is now led by three second-generation principals, Jason Forney, Jason Jewhurst, and Dana Kelly, who took over the practice in 2016. Architects of a broad spectrum of work regionally and nationally, the firm is widely recognized for adaptive reuse projects of historical, industrial, and mid-century buildings, including MASS MoCA in North Adams, Massachusetts, as well as future-focused net zero design such as the R.W. Kern Center at Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusetts.

“Architecture Making is Like the Unveiling of a Surprise": In Conversation with Leers Weinzapfel Associates

07:00 - 17 April, 2019
“Architecture Making is Like the Unveiling of a Surprise": In Conversation with Leers Weinzapfel Associates, University of Massachusetts Amherst John W. Olver Design Building. Photo: Albert Vecerka / Esto
University of Massachusetts Amherst John W. Olver Design Building. Photo: Albert Vecerka / Esto

Boston-based Leers Weinzapfel Associates was founded by two women, Andrea Leers and Jane Weinzapfel, in 1982, later joined by a next generation of partners, Josiah Stevenson, and Tom Chung. The majority of their work is done on university campuses across America, but this can hardly be identified as the firm’s focus, as campuses are actually cities in miniature, containing nearly every building type imaginable. The point of difference, however, is that campus buildings are generally designed with more idealism than projects in our chaotic cities and mundane suburbs.

University of Massachusetts Amherst John W. Olver Design Building. Photo: Albert Vecerka / Esto Wentworth Institute of Technology Center for Engineering Innovation and Sciences, Boston. Photo: Albert Vecerka / Esto University of Pennsylvania Gateway Complex. Photo: Peter Aaron / Esto University of Massachusetts Amherst John W. Olver Design Building. Photo: Ngoc Doan + 32

Revealing the Mystery Behind the Architect: What Was James Stirling Really Like?

08:30 - 14 August, 2018
© Evan Chakroff
© Evan Chakroff

James Stirling (1926-1992) was a British architect who is considered by many as the premier architect of his generation and an innovator in postwar architecture. Some of his most famous projects include the Sackler Museum, No 1 Poultry, and the Neue Staatsgalerie. Through the influence of his teacher Colin Rowe, Stirling had a deep understanding of architectural history, yet never adopted a singular doctrine. His career began with designs that were more aligned with what would later be labeled as the high-tech style, but evolved into buildings that were a series of dynamic and often colorful arrangements. Stirling’s aesthetic tropes ultimately gave the final push that broke architecture free from the clutch of post-war European Modernism as he turned the Modernist canon of “form follows function” into a hyperbole by celebrating the expression of a building’s program with his over-the-top details. Stirling’s work is still largely influential, and the recursive wave of history has shown that the underlying implications of his oeuvre remains somewhere in all architectural practice of the present day.

When Is the Best Time to Look for an Architecture Job?

09:30 - 30 May, 2018
Photo by <a href='https://unsplash.com/photos/Fj1aWk4LcNg'>STIL on Unsplash</a>
Photo by STIL on Unsplash

This article was originally published by The Architect's Guide.

So I won't make you wait for the answer. The best time to look for an architecture job is...

OMA's Ellen van Loon Discusses the Firm's New Danish Architecture Center

16:00 - 3 May, 2018
OMA's Ellen van Loon Discusses the Firm's New Danish Architecture Center, Courtesy of Louisiana Channel
Courtesy of Louisiana Channel

Louisiana Channel has released a new video interview with Ellen van Loon, the Dutch “design duchess” of OMA. In the interview, available to watch below, van Loon discusses the concept of “architectural contamination” behind OMA's new mixed-use "BLOX" scheme, home of the Danish Architecture Center in Copenhagen.

Van Loon discusses the process of “re-invention” needed for the scheme’s realization, in terms of both function and location. Situated on an old brewery site, the scheme seeks to embed architects and visitors in their own field of study, “placing them in the center of the building, which meant they would contaminate all other functions.”