1. ArchDaily
  2. Sustainable Design

Sustainable Design: The Latest Architecture and News

Venice Authorities Introduce Ticketing and Entry Fees to Solve Over-Tourism Crisis

Following several initiatives to tackle the tourism and architectural heritage crisis, Venice authorities have announced that as of January 16th, 2023, visitors will have to book a visiting slot and an entrance fee to see the historic canal city. The newly proposed ticketing system, which is claimed to be the first of its kind in the world, hopes to control its "over-tourism" crisis, a challenge that has been affecting the lagoon's ecosystem, urban development, and local population.

Venice Authorities Introduce Ticketing and Entry Fees to Solve Over-Tourism Crisis  - Image 3 of 4Venice Authorities Introduce Ticketing and Entry Fees to Solve Over-Tourism Crisis  - Image 2 of 4Venice Authorities Introduce Ticketing and Entry Fees to Solve Over-Tourism Crisis  - Image 1 of 4Venice Authorities Introduce Ticketing and Entry Fees to Solve Over-Tourism Crisis  - Featured ImageVenice Authorities Introduce Ticketing and Entry Fees to Solve Over-Tourism Crisis  - More Images

Cities Embrace Climate Action Planning to Mitigate the Adverse Effects of Climate Change

Cities across the globe are developing comprehensive action plans in order to create a coordinated response to the challenges of climate change. Targets and goals for consumption-based emissions are important for guiding strategic planning and decision-making, improving accountability, and communicating the direction of travel to businesses and the public. National and regional government officials are working with the private sector, international organizations, and civil society to create change at every level, from structural interventions in supply chains and industries to individual choices.  This demonstrates a rising understanding of the role of cities in mitigating the adverse effects of rising temperatures.

Cities Embrace Climate Action Planning to Mitigate the Adverse Effects of Climate Change - Image 1 of 4Cities Embrace Climate Action Planning to Mitigate the Adverse Effects of Climate Change - Image 2 of 4Cities Embrace Climate Action Planning to Mitigate the Adverse Effects of Climate Change - Image 3 of 4Cities Embrace Climate Action Planning to Mitigate the Adverse Effects of Climate Change - Image 4 of 4Cities Embrace Climate Action Planning to Mitigate the Adverse Effects of Climate Change - More Images

Towards Sustainable and Affordable Housing: Is 3D Printing the Future or the Present?

In recent years, the construction industry has faced unprecedented challenges. A lack of skilled workers is driving up costs of labor, there is a global housing shortage, and the effects of climate change around the world are clearer than ever. Therefore, questioning traditional construction methods and pushing the limits of innovation has become a top priority, forcing the industry to implement new technologies as they get on board the digital transformation era. There is one innovation, however, that looks particularly promising: 3D construction printing. Although relatively recent, the technology has already been successfully tested in numerous structures, houses and apartment buildings, reshaping residential construction as we know it. Hence, 3D printing could very well be a viable alternative for more efficient, sustainable and cost-effective mass housing solutions in the near future, positively impacting people’s lives and contributing to greener, healthier cities.

Google’s Bay View Campus Designed by BIG and Heatherwick Studio Opens in Silicon Valley, California

Google’s first ground-up campus, designed by BIG - Bjarke Ingels Group and Heatherwick Studios in collaboration with Google’s design and engineering teams, opened in Silicon Valley. The campus’ mission is to create a human-centric design for the future of Google’s workplace and set new global sustainability standards for construction and office design. The site aims to operate entirely on carbon-free energy by 2030; it integrates the most extensive geothermal pile system in North America and is net-water positive. The campus also includes 17 acres of high-value natural areas, including wet meadows, woodlands, and marsh.

Google’s Bay View Campus Designed by BIG and Heatherwick Studio Opens in Silicon Valley, California - Image 1 of 4Google’s Bay View Campus Designed by BIG and Heatherwick Studio Opens in Silicon Valley, California - Image 2 of 4Google’s Bay View Campus Designed by BIG and Heatherwick Studio Opens in Silicon Valley, California - Image 3 of 4Google’s Bay View Campus Designed by BIG and Heatherwick Studio Opens in Silicon Valley, California - Image 4 of 4Google’s Bay View Campus Designed by BIG and Heatherwick Studio Opens in Silicon Valley, California - More Images+ 6

Climate-Smart Furniture: The Story Behind a 100% Sustainable Lounge Chair

Since the early 2000s, it has been widely reported that the construction industry accounts for nearly 40% of the planet’s CO2 emissions. The role of interiors in that percentage has been historically underestimated, with common statistics suggesting that a project’s furniture, fixtures and equipment are only responsible for about 7 to 10% of its overall carbon footprint. However, new research notably indicates the contrary: in a building’s average life span, the carbon footprint of its interiors will equal – if not exceed – that of the structure and envelope. Interior design, to the surprise of many, has actually been doing great harm.

Designs for Carbon Positive Affordable Housing

 | Sponsored Content

Why this competition? Why Now?

cove. tool's core mission is to fight climate change by helping architects, engineers, contractors, and developers use data-driven design through automation and cost optimization. Creating a competition premise that called attention to this critical issue was important. With the recently published landmark Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC) 2021 report that warned of increased extreme heatwaves, droughts, and flooding, as well as a key temperature limit on track to be broken in just over a decade, it further highlighted the urgency. As climate change intensifies, housing stability will be increasingly under threat. These two inextricably linked issues had the potential to spark innovative ideas from the international design community and community-at-large. With the sizeable grand prize of $50k, the goal was to solicit entries from all over the world and help facilitate more conversations about carbon positive, affordable housing that could be replicated in multiple neighborhoods, cities, and countries. Sustainability and affordability are often two topics that are at odds. However, this competition proved that there are creative solutions to complex problems.

The Build Better Now Virtual Pavilion at COP26 Showcases Pioneering Sustainable Designs

The Build Better Now virtual pavilion opened to the public during COP26, showcasing seventeen sustainable projects that demonstrate the built environment's opportunities for addressing the climate crisis. The initiative, run by UK Green Building Council, comes as a global call for climate action, highlighting the AEC's industry's commitment to sustainable practice on a worldwide stage, particularly since this year the COP26 dedicated a day to buildings and cities.

The Build Better Now Virtual Pavilion at COP26 Showcases Pioneering Sustainable Designs - Image 1 of 4The Build Better Now Virtual Pavilion at COP26 Showcases Pioneering Sustainable Designs - Image 2 of 4The Build Better Now Virtual Pavilion at COP26 Showcases Pioneering Sustainable Designs - Image 3 of 4The Build Better Now Virtual Pavilion at COP26 Showcases Pioneering Sustainable Designs - Image 4 of 4The Build Better Now Virtual Pavilion at COP26 Showcases Pioneering Sustainable Designs - More Images+ 10

Sustainable Building Design: Top 5 Metrics Every Architect Should Know

 | Sponsored Content

Energy codes around the world get stricter every year, architects need to prepare for various challenges ahead. The first step is to understand the key metrics needed to conduct early-stage analyses and collaborate across various teams. With buildings responsible for 39% of total carbon emissions, the design practice is evolving to bake in data-driven energy efficiency. This change is leading architects to quickly become building performance experts and create spaces that are high performance and healthy for occupants.

Kosovo Pavilion at the 2021 Venice Biennale Explores the Role of Urbanization in Bonding Human with Nature

Titled "Containporary", the Kosovo Pavilion at the 17th International Architecture Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia, evaluates the role of global urbanization and the process of planning and creating sustainable environments. Curated by Maksut Vezgishi, the pavilion will be on display at the Arsenale from May 22nd to November 21st, 2021.

Kosovo Pavilion at the 2021 Venice Biennale Explores the Role of Urbanization in Bonding Human with Nature  - Image 1 of 4Kosovo Pavilion at the 2021 Venice Biennale Explores the Role of Urbanization in Bonding Human with Nature  - Image 2 of 4Kosovo Pavilion at the 2021 Venice Biennale Explores the Role of Urbanization in Bonding Human with Nature  - Image 3 of 4Kosovo Pavilion at the 2021 Venice Biennale Explores the Role of Urbanization in Bonding Human with Nature  - Image 4 of 4Kosovo Pavilion at the 2021 Venice Biennale Explores the Role of Urbanization in Bonding Human with Nature  - More Images+ 21

When It Comes to Climate Crisis, Traditional Practice Is Broken

This article was originally published on Common Edge as "When It Comes to Climate Change, Traditional Practice Is Broken."

Sustainable design in the United States is for many a sort of Rorschach test. The construction industry is either making steady progress toward the ultimate goal of a carbon-free building sector, or it’s moving entirely too slowly, missing key targets as the ecological clock keeps ticking. The perplexing truth to all of this is: both are ostensibly true. In recent decades the industry has become significantly more energy efficient. We’ve added building stock but flattened the energy curve. The cost of renewables continues to drop. But way more is required, much more quickly. At the same time, huge hurdles remain. Without a renewable grid and stringent energy codes, it’s hard to see how we can fully decarbonize the building sector in even 20 years, let alone at the timeline suggested by increasingly worried climate scientists. It’s the classic good news/bad news scenario (or vice-versa, depending on your mood).

How Are Public Washrooms Shaping Places in China?

How Are Public Washrooms Shaping Places in China? - Image 13 of 4
Public Toilets in Zuzhai Village / cnS. Image © Siming Wu

In recent years, with the accelerated urban development of public spaces in China, public washrooms have been assigned numerous new roles. Designers have come up with a variety of proposals which suggest turning public washrooms into a place where social gathering can be redefined, and temporary stay can be more engaging. Although the scale of public washrooms is significantly smaller than that of any other type of architecture, Chinese architects have been working innovatively on fitting the public washrooms into the changing social contexts. Below are a few examples that demonstrate some current architectural experiments with public washroom design in China.

How Are Public Washrooms Shaping Places in China? - Image 1 of 4How Are Public Washrooms Shaping Places in China? - Image 2 of 4How Are Public Washrooms Shaping Places in China? - Image 3 of 4How Are Public Washrooms Shaping Places in China? - Image 4 of 4How Are Public Washrooms Shaping Places in China? - More Images+ 30

Treehouse C / Stilt Studios

Treehouse C / Stilt Studios - Interior Photography, Apartments, Beam, Facade, Door, Table, ChairTreehouse C / Stilt Studios - Interior Photography, Apartments, Deck, Beam, Facade, Door, Chair, TableTreehouse C / Stilt Studios - Interior Photography, Apartments, Bedroom, Door, Beam, Fence, Bed, ChairTreehouse C / Stilt Studios - Exterior Photography, Apartments, GardenTreehouse C / Stilt Studios - More Images+ 14

  • Architects: Stilt Studios
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area :  71
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2020

Alexis Dornier on Architectural Experimentation and his New Venture, Stilt Studios

“It all started with the question: What if I’m going to build my own house?" It was this consideration that prompted Alexis Dornier to note that when he's providing architectural design service he's mostly catering, filtering and catalyzing input from other people that have budgets, preferences and tastes and it’s up to him to channel or organize that and let it "stream through" him. Using his craft to put it in order. "But what if you did not have that other hand [designer's help]? What would you do?”

Archdaily’s Hana Abdel, projects curator, sat down with Alexis Dornier to discuss his latest venture as co-founder of Stilt Studios, a company “focused on making Architectural design accessible to a greater audience of people. People who wouldn’t be able to afford an architect or don’t want to go through the trouble of working with an architect. So, what if we could create a product, or an architecture that almost works as a product.”

Alexis Dornier on Architectural Experimentation and his New Venture, Stilt Studios - SustainabilityAlexis Dornier on Architectural Experimentation and his New Venture, Stilt Studios - SustainabilityAlexis Dornier on Architectural Experimentation and his New Venture, Stilt Studios - SustainabilityAlexis Dornier on Architectural Experimentation and his New Venture, Stilt Studios - SustainabilityAlexis Dornier on Architectural Experimentation and his New Venture, Stilt Studios - More Images+ 28

Bringing the Outdoors Inside: The Benefits of Biophilia in Architecture and Interior Spaces

If a person were to imagine a setting of complete relaxation, odds are the first image that comes to mind is a place surrounded by nature, be it a forest, the mountains, the sea, or a meadow. Rarely does one imagine an office or a shopping mall as a source of comfort and relaxation. Still, the majority of people spend almost 80-90 % of their time indoors, going back and forth from their houses to their workplaces.

Architects and designers are now searching for design solutions that will resonate well into the future, turning to 'biophilia' as an important source of inspiration that promotes well-being, health, and emotional comfort.

Bringing the Outdoors Inside: The Benefits of Biophilia in Architecture and Interior Spaces - Image 1 of 4Bringing the Outdoors Inside: The Benefits of Biophilia in Architecture and Interior Spaces - Image 2 of 4Bringing the Outdoors Inside: The Benefits of Biophilia in Architecture and Interior Spaces - Image 3 of 4Bringing the Outdoors Inside: The Benefits of Biophilia in Architecture and Interior Spaces - Image 4 of 4Bringing the Outdoors Inside: The Benefits of Biophilia in Architecture and Interior Spaces - More Images+ 10