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Common Edge: The Latest Architecture and News

What We Can Learn About Public Space From Cuba

10:00 - 12 April, 2019
What We Can Learn About Public Space From Cuba, © Sam Valentine
© Sam Valentine

This article was originally published on CommonEdge as "What Landscape Architects and Urban Designers Can Learn About Public Space From Cuba."

It was certainly what I had come for: I was sitting on broad, cobbled steps, watching people interact in the public realm. It was an August afternoon in Cuba, and I had found temporary respite from the harsh sun beneath a haphazard array of trees. My design work as a landscape architect focuses on urban parks, streetscapes, and academic campuses, and I wanted to see how differently the open spaces of Cuba might function.

Anne Taylor on How Design Education Can Transform Our Schools

12:00 - 7 April, 2019
Anne Taylor on How Design Education Can Transform Our Schools, © School Zone Institute
© School Zone Institute

This article was originally published on CommonEdge as "How Design Education Can Transform Our Schools".

Opinion: Women in Architecture Need a New Set of Role Models—Beyond the Star System

08:00 - 23 March, 2019
Sesc Pompéia / Lina Bo Bardi. Image © Nelson Kon
Sesc Pompéia / Lina Bo Bardi. Image © Nelson Kon

This article was originally published on CommonEdge as "Women in Architecture Need a New Set of Role Models—Beyond the Star System"

When the Best Laid Plans Go Awry: What Went Wrong with New Orleans' Make It Right Homes?

07:00 - 12 March, 2019
When the Best Laid Plans Go Awry: What Went Wrong with New Orleans' Make It Right Homes?, Make It Right homes in the Lower Ninth Ward, New Orleans. Used under Creative Commons. Image © Flickr user drewzhrodague licensed under CC BY 2.0
Make It Right homes in the Lower Ninth Ward, New Orleans. Used under Creative Commons. Image © Flickr user drewzhrodague licensed under CC BY 2.0

This article was originally published on CommonEdge as "Rob Walker on the Mistakes of Brad Pitt's Make it Right."

I will start with a confession: I was part of the fawning media swarm that lauded and applauded the accomplishments of Make It Right, Brad Pitt’s bold attempt to rebuild a portion of the Lower Ninth Ward in New Orleans. The project was, it seemed once, one of the few post-Katrina success stories coming out of that flood-ravaged community.

Amazon's False Flag Urban Mission: What the HQ2 Debacle is Really About

14:00 - 2 March, 2019
Amazon's False Flag Urban Mission: What the HQ2 Debacle is Really About, The Amazon Headquarters in Seattle, WA. Photo by Flickr user Evan Chakroff. ImageAmazon HQ / NBBJ
The Amazon Headquarters in Seattle, WA. Photo by Flickr user Evan Chakroff. ImageAmazon HQ / NBBJ

This article was originally published on CommonEdge as "An Amazon Correction: The City Won – and the Company isn't Going Anywhere."

The Amazon brouhaha needs clarification: the company is not “pulling out of New York.” It’s simply canceling the construction of a physical campus in Long Island City, the fastest growing neighborhood in the city for almost a decade. The fate of that neighborhood reflects the outsize development trend of the larger city and the erroneous assumption that construction means growth. But let’s leave the bigger picture aside for the moment.

What is Beauty in Architecture Today - and Are We Afraid of it?

07:00 - 22 February, 2019
What is Beauty in Architecture Today - and Are We Afraid of it?, Sagrada Familia, Antoni Gaudi. ImageImage via Wikimedia
Sagrada Familia, Antoni Gaudi. ImageImage via Wikimedia

This article was originally published on CommonEdge as "The 'B' Word: How a More Universal Concept of Beauty Can Reshape Architecture."

What Urbanism Needs to Learn from Dubai

07:00 - 11 February, 2019
What Urbanism Needs to Learn from Dubai , Photo by Flickr user Lars Plougmann
Photo by Flickr user Lars Plougmann

In the past three decades, Dubai has grown from a dusty desert town to a strategic hub for international business and tourism. As a result, several cities in the developing world have been competing to outdo one another in the race to replicate this development model—an urbanism largely built around the automobile, luxury villas, gleaming skyscrapers, massive shopping malls, and ambitious “smart” cities, designed and built from scratch. Across Africa, these new developments go by different names: Eko Atlantic City Nigeria, Vision City in Rwanda, Ebene Cyber City in Mauritius; Konza Technology City in Kenya; Safari City in Tanzania; Le Cite du Fleuve in DR Congo, and several others. All are mimicries of Dubai.

Why Reusing Buildings Should - and Must - be the Next Big Thing

07:00 - 22 January, 2019
Why Reusing Buildings Should - and Must - be the Next Big Thing, LocHal / Mecanoo. Image © Ossip van Duivenbode
LocHal / Mecanoo. Image © Ossip van Duivenbode

Sustainability awards and standards touted by professional architecture organizations often stop at opening day, failing to take into account the day-to-day energy use of a building. With the current format unlikely to change, how can we rethink the way what sustainability means in architecture today? The first step might be to stop rewarding purpose-built architecture, and look instead to the buildings we already have. This article was originally published on CommonEdge as"Why Reusing Buildings Should be the Next Big Thing."

At the inaugural Rio Conference on the Global Environment in 1992, three facts became abundantly clear: the earth was indeed warming; fossil fuels were no longer a viable source of energy; the built environment would have to adapt to this new reality. That year I published an essay in the Journal of Architectural Education called “Architecture for a Contingent Environment” suggesting that architects join with both naturalists and preservationists to confront this situation.

Why Do Architects Still Struggle with Disability Requirements?

07:00 - 8 January, 2019
Why Do Architects Still Struggle with Disability Requirements? , © Hufton + Crow. ImageStaircases such as this one, in ZHA's Dominion Office Building, are beautiful design elements but can pose challenges to those with limited mobility.
© Hufton + Crow. ImageStaircases such as this one, in ZHA's Dominion Office Building, are beautiful design elements but can pose challenges to those with limited mobility.

This article was originally published on Common Edge as " Why Architects Still Struggle With Disability Requirements 28 Years After Passage of the ADA".

The recent death of President George H.W. Bush occasioned assessments of his administration’s legislative achievements, one of which was the far-ranging Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), a civil rights act signed into law in 1990. The law included accommodations for people with disabilities in buildings. In the ensuing decades the ADA has had a significant impact on the design and construction of the built environment in the U.S. To gauge the impact of ADA, how it has evolved, common misconceptions about ADA, and its role in promoting social equity in architecture, I spoke with Peter Stratton, Senior Vice President and Managing Director of Accessibility Services at Steven Winter Associates, who works with architects and others in the construction industry on the application of the ADA design standards. (I worked at the Connecticut-based Winter firm between 1996 and 2006; Stratton was a colleague.)

Architecture without Architects: The Cut-Paste Typology Taking Over America

09:30 - 11 December, 2018
Architecture without Architects: The Cut-Paste Typology Taking Over America, Tejon 35 / Meridian 105 Architecture. Image © Raul Garcia
Tejon 35 / Meridian 105 Architecture. Image © Raul Garcia

This article was originally published on CommonEdge as "When Buildings Are Shaped More by Code than by Architects."

Architects are often driven by forces which are stronger than aesthetics or even client whims and desires. To some extent we’re captive to the tools and materials we use, and the legal limitations placed on us as architects. Today a new code definition has changed one type of building in all of the ways architects usually control.

How to Judge a Building: Does it Make you Feel More, Or Less Alive?

09:30 - 7 December, 2018
How to Judge a Building: Does it Make you Feel More, Or Less Alive? , via Wikimedia. ImageSelgas Cano's Pavilion at the 2018 Brugge Triennale
via Wikimedia. ImageSelgas Cano's Pavilion at the 2018 Brugge Triennale

This extract was originally published on Common Edge as "The Legacy of Christopher Alexander: Criteria for an Intelligent Architecture."

In his monumental four-volume book, The Nature of Order, Christopher Alexander talks about an intelligent architecture, responsive to human needs and sensibilities through adaptation to existing buildings and nature. This is a new way of viewing the world—a way of connecting to it, and to ourselves—yet it is very much the same as the most ancient ways of connecting.

Design Criticism Ignores the Places that it Could Help the Most

09:30 - 27 November, 2018
Design Criticism Ignores the Places that it Could Help the Most, Growing economies- and the inspiration of Western style architectural wealth - has led to the development of areas such as these across the world. This example, in Ordos, Mongolia, was built for a prospective population that never quite came.. Image © Raphael Olivier
Growing economies- and the inspiration of Western style architectural wealth - has led to the development of areas such as these across the world. This example, in Ordos, Mongolia, was built for a prospective population that never quite came.. Image © Raphael Olivier

This article was originally published on CommonEdge as "The Design Media Needs to Examine its Own Privilege."

Kate Wagner grew up in rural North Carolina. As a kid, her mom, who never went to college, worked in a grocery store deli and later in childcare. Her dad had a steady government job with a pension, and his time in the military meant he had the resources and benefits needed to get a college degree. Wagner describes her economic background as “one foot in the working class and one foot in the middle class, and it was always a negotiation between those two classes.” They were, she says, “just normal-ass American people.”

Modernism: The International Style that Wasn't

09:30 - 20 November, 2018
Modernism: The International Style that Wasn't, Farnsworth House / Mies van der Rohe. Image
Farnsworth House / Mies van der Rohe. Image

This article was originally published on CommonEdge as "Was Modernism Really International? A New History Says No."

I taught architectural history in two schools of architecture during the 1980s and 1990s. Back then it was common for students to get a full three-semester course that began with Antiquity and ended with Modernism, with a nod to later twentieth-century architecture. My text for the middle section was Spiro Kostof’s magisterial History of Architecture: Settings and Rituals. With many centuries to cover, he spent very little effort in dealing with the twentieth century. In the last third of the course, students read texts such as Towards a New Architecture by Le Corbusier and Reyner Banham’s Theory and Design in the First Machine Age. My colleagues and I felt that we offered students a pluralistic and comprehensive review of key developments in the history of the built environment.

Villa Tugendhat / Mies van der Rohe. Image © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Thomas Lewandovski + 15

Philip Johnson: A Complicated, Reprehensible History

07:00 - 8 November, 2018
Philip Johnson: A Complicated, Reprehensible History, © Richard Barnes
© Richard Barnes

This interview was originally published on Common Edge as "Mark Lamster on His New Biography of Philip Johnson."

Philip Johnson lived a long and extraordinarily eventful life. He was an architect, a museum curator, a tastemaker, a kingmaker, a schemer, an exceptionally vivid cultural presence. Mark Lamster, architecture critic of the Dallas Morning News and Harvard Loeb Fellowship recipient, has now written a thoroughly engaging biography of him entitled, Philip Johnson, Architect of the Modern Century: The Man in the Glass House. I talked to Lamster two weeks ago about the book and the bundle of contradictions that was Philip Johnson.

© Flickr user Amir Nejad © David Shankbone Courtesy of American Seating .jpg Cross Section of the Crystal Cathedral + 11

How a Daily Sketch Improves Architecture

09:30 - 25 October, 2018
© Frank Harmon
© Frank Harmon

This article was originally published on Common Edge as "How the Quick Daily Drawing Puts Humanity Back Into Architecture."

Architect Frank Harmon has a discipline: he tries to do a freehand drawing every day. He doesn’t spend much time on them. About five minutes. These short spurts of depiction have the effect of catching lightning in a bottle or, as Virginia Woolf once said about the importance of writing every day, “to clap the net over the butterfly of moment.” To capture these moments you must be fast. The minute moves. Harmon’s drawings feel loose, fuzzy at the edges. You sense their five-minute duration.

Frank Harmon Frank Harmon Frank Harmon © Frank Harmon + 25

How Architectural Theory Distances People from Design

07:00 - 17 October, 2018
How Architectural Theory Distances People from Design, © Ross Brady, via CommonEdge
© Ross Brady, via CommonEdge

This article was originally published on Common Edge as "How Architectural 'Theory' Disconnects the Profession from the Public."

Whatever the form—personal, theoretical, scholarly—architects frequently veer into the philosophical terrain when defending otherwise subjective design decisions. Personally, this may be justifiable. But professionally, this reliance on quasi-philosophical spin is one of the fundamental ways architecture differs from other practical pillars of society, such as law, finance or medicine. Those disciplines are based on structures of knowledge (precedent or code, economics, and science, respectively) that mediate between professional decisions and subjective judgement.

Words on the Street: Art, Architecture, and the Public Protest

09:30 - 1 October, 2018
Words on the Street: Art, Architecture, and the Public Protest, Barricades in the streets of Bordeaux during the May 1968 protests in France. ImageCourtesy of Wikimedia
Barricades in the streets of Bordeaux during the May 1968 protests in France. ImageCourtesy of Wikimedia

This article was originally published as "What Marchers Today Can Learn from the May 1968 Protests in Paris" on CommonEdge in May 2018. In the 50 years since the historic and worldwide protests of 1968, much has changed. But today's political climate seems equally volatile, with seismic changes threatening social and political establishments across the globe. Lessons from the past are, to borrow the phrase of the moment, more relevant than ever.

American friends recently sent an email: “What’s going on with the French political system? Why all the strikes? What about the endless protest marches? We’d like to visit you in Paris, but we’re a little wary.”

"I Don't Really See AI as A Threat": Imdat As on Artificial Intelligence in Architecture

09:30 - 30 September, 2018
"I Don't Really See AI as A Threat": Imdat As on Artificial Intelligence in Architecture, Joris Laarman for MX3D
Joris Laarman for MX3D

Is Artificial Intelligence (AI) the doom of the architecture profession and design services (as some warn) or a way to improve the overall design quality of the built environment, expanding and extending design services in ways yet to be explored? I sat down with my University of Hartford colleague Imdat As. Dr. As is an architect with an expertise in digital design who is an assistant professor of architecture and the co-founder of Arcbazar.com, a crowd-sourced design site. His current research on AI and its impact on architectural design and practice is funded by the US Department of Defense. Recently we sat down and talked about how this emerging technology might change design and practice as we now know it—and if so, would that be such a bad thing?

This article was originally published as "Doom or Bloom: What Will Artificial Intelligence Mean for Architecture?" on CommonEdge. It has been slightly abridged for publication on this platform; the full interview can be read on CommonEdge here.