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Chinese Architecture: The Latest Architecture and News

Life and Aesthetics Experience in Phoenix Mansion / gad

© Yi Fan © Yi Fan © Yi Fan © Yi Fan + 22

Residential  · 
Hangzhou, China
  • Architects Authors of this architecture project gad
  • Area Area of this architecture project
    2127.0 m2
  • Project Year Brands with products used in this architecture project
    2017

Nanjing Museum / CCTN Design

Gallery of special exhibitions. Image Courtesy of CCTN Design
Gallery of special exhibitions. Image Courtesy of CCTN Design

Original Wood Stairs At the Junction. Image © Guangyuan Zhang Atrium of Gallery of Special Exhibtions. Image Courtesy of CCTN Design Facade Detail. Image Courtesy of CCTN Design Junction area between the reserved old main hall and the newly built gallery of history. Image © Guangyuan Zhang + 28

Extension  · 
Nanjing, China
  • Architects Authors of this architecture project CCTN Design
  • Area Area of this architecture project
    84500.0 m2
  • Project Year Brands with products used in this architecture project
    2013

Wang Jing Memorial Hall / DnA

© Ziling Wang
© Ziling Wang

© Ziling Wang © Ziling Wang © Ziling Wang © Ziling Wang + 26

Lishui, China
  • Architects Authors of this architecture project DnA
  • Area Area of this architecture project
    406.0 m2
  • Project Year Brands with products used in this architecture project
    2017

What It’s Like to be an Architect who Doesn’t Design Buildings

There's an old, weary tune that people sing to caution against being an architect: the long years of academic training, the studio work that takes away from sleep, and the small job market in which too many people are vying for the same positions. When you finally get going, the work is trying as well. Many spend months or even years working on the computer and doing models before seeing any of the designs become concrete. If you're talking about the grind, architects know this well enough from their training, and this time of ceaseless endeavor in the workplace only adds to that despair.

Which is why more and more architects are branching out. Better hours, more interesting opportunities, and a chance to do more than just build models. Furthermore, the skills you learn as an architect, such as being sensitive to space, and being able to grasp the cultural and societal demands of a place, can be put to use in rather interesting ways. Here, 3 editors at ArchDaily talk about being an architect, why they stopped designing buildings, and what they do in their work now. 

Wuyuan Skywells Hotel / anySCALE

Exterior. Image © Marc Goodwin Public space. Image © Marc Goodwin Surroundings. Image © Marc Goodwin Exterior. Image © Marc Goodwin + 40

Refurbishment  · 
Shangrao, China
  • Architects Authors of this architecture project anySCALE
  • Area Area of this architecture project
    1385.0 m2
  • Project Year Brands with products used in this architecture project
    2017

Lijiang Back and Forward Boutique Hotel / NTYPE

Central Yard Day View. Image © Joao Lemos Facade Screen Casting Light and Shadow into the Room. Image © Joao Lemos Local Naxi Lady Walking Through the Corridor Connecting the Front and Back. Image © Joao Lemos Lobby. Image © Joao Lemos + 20

Hotels  · 
Lijiang, China
  • Architects Authors of this architecture project NTYPE
  • Area Area of this architecture project
    703.0 m2
  • Project Year Brands with products used in this architecture project
    2017

Best Modern Examples of Ancient Courtyard Renovations in China

© Fangfang Tian
© Fangfang Tian

Chinese courtyard houses are one of the most common housing typologies spanning all the way from the northern capital of Beijing to the poetic southern cities Hangzhou and back to the picturesque regions of Yunnan. Typically referred as heyuan, these courtyards homes are simply a “yard enclosed on four sides."

Traditionally, heyuans were large single-family homes, built to house multiple generations of descendants, thus the essential gathering place for micro-communities. Today, however, many heyuans in China are faced with the challenges of encroaching urban development. The national reforms of the 1950’s divided up many existing courtyards to be occupied by multiple families and groups, exhausting ancient sanitation systems nationwide. These practical circumstances together with market-driven conditions have sparked a renewed interest among architects, to upgrade the conditions of these ancient courtyards and explore the spatial and conceptual possibilities of the typology within their fast-changing urban fabric. Scroll down for a selection of projects that will refresh your understanding of Chinese courtyards.

© Mingming Zhang Courtesy of hyperSity Architects Courtesy of Atelier Archmixing © Weiqi Jin, Ning Wang + 17

Renovation of Xi’an South Gate Plaza / China Northwest Architecture Design and Research Institute

huacheng park. Image © Chen Su
huacheng park. Image © Chen Su

miao garden east details. Image © Chen Su miao garden sunken plaza. Image © Chen Su song garden. Image © Chen Su song garden sunrise view. Image © Chen Su + 23

The MaoHaus / AntiStatics Architecture

MaoHaus Exterior. Image © Xia Zhi
MaoHaus Exterior. Image © Xia Zhi

MaoHaus Night. Image © Xia Zhi MaoHaus Exterior. Image © Xia Zhi MaoHaus Detail. Image © Xia Zhi MaoHaus Site. Image © Xia Zhi + 52

Small Scale  · 
Beijing, China
  • Architects Authors of this architecture project AntiStatics Architecture
  • Area Area of this architecture project
    2000.0 m2
  • Project Year Brands with products used in this architecture project
    2017

Spring Whispers Book Club / FON STUDIO

Courtesy of FON STUDIO
Courtesy of FON STUDIO

Courtesy of FON STUDIO Courtesy of FON STUDIO Courtesy of FON STUDIO Courtesy of FON STUDIO + 27

Renovation  · 
Beijing, China
  • Architects Authors of this architecture project FON STUDIO
  • Area Area of this architecture project
    70.0 m2
  • Project Year Brands with products used in this architecture project
    2017

Space Renovation of 69 Beishan St. / The Design Institute of Landscape and Architecture China Academy of Art

Vestibule. Image © Aoguan Performance of Architecture Courtyard and entrances. Image © Aoguan Performance of Architecture Brick pattern. Image © Aoguan Performance of Architecture Courtyard facing living area. Image © Aoguan Performance of Architecture + 36

Renovation  · 
Hangzhou Shi, China

Beijing ‘Tsuo’ / Wonder Architects

Collecting’ views. Image © Haiting Sun Interaction between the rocks and our living space. Image © Haiting Sun The views corresponding with the space. Image © Haiting Sun The views corresponding with the space. Image © Haiting Sun + 32

Refurbishment  · 
Xicheng Qu, China
  • Architects Authors of this architecture project Wonder Architects
  • Area Area of this architecture project
    100.0 m2
  • Project Year Brands with products used in this architecture project
    2017

Tongling Recluse / RSAA / Büro Ziyu Zhuang

© SU Shengliang © SU Shengliang © SU Shengliang © SU Shengliang + 59

Refurbishment  · 
Tongling, China
  • Architects Authors of this architecture project RSAA
  • Area Area of this architecture project
    160.0 m2
  • Project Year Brands with products used in this architecture project
    2017

Wuyishan Bamboo Raft Factory / TAO - Trace Architecture Office

© Shengliang Su © Shengliang Su © Shengliang Su © Shengliang Su + 66

Factory  · 
China, China
  • Architects Authors of this architecture project TAO - Trace Architecture Office
  • Area Area of this architecture project
    14629.0 m2
  • Project Year Brands with products used in this architecture project
    2013

Hangzhou Ya Gu Quan Shan Hotel / The Architectural Design and Research Institute of Zhejiang University

© Zhao Qiang © Zhao Qiang © Zhao Qiang © Zhao Qiang + 33

Hotels  · 
China, China

10 Young Chinese Architecture Firms To Watch Out For

2016 has been a momentous year for Chinese architecture. From the completion of the Harbin Opera house by MAD to the Aga Khan Awards recognizing Zhang Ke of Standard Architecture for his micro-scale design of the Hutong Children’s Library and Art Centre in Beijing. It seems the general perception of Chinese architecture has finally moved beyond the big, weird and ugly.

Since we’ve started to branch out into China, the ArchDaily China team has been able to discover the rich layers beyond just these rising Chinese stars. As part of the country's large-scale urbanization process, last year, we posted some of the large-scale projects designed by China’s (largely unknown) Design & Research institutions such as train stations and cultural centers.

In addition, we’ve also come across a series of smaller, lesser known, younger practices that focuses more on small-scale experimental work. Here are our top ten favorites: 

Tiantai No.2 Primary School . Image © Yu Xu Youth Hotel of iD Town. Image © Chaos.Z Tea House in Hutong. Image © Wang Ning Chi She. Image © Su Shengliang + 25