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Dymaxion: The Latest Architecture and News

AD Classics: The Dymaxion House / Buckminster Fuller

14:00 - 9 February, 2019
AD Classics: The Dymaxion House / Buckminster Fuller, Bucky and the Dymaxion © Bettmann/Corbis via britannica.com
Bucky and the Dymaxion © Bettmann/Corbis via britannica.com

The Dymaxion House was a futuristic dwelling invented by the architect and practical philosopher R. Buckminister Fuller - who would have turned 118 today. The word “Dymaxion,” which combines the words dynamic, maximum and tension, was coined (among many others) by Fuller himself.

In 1920 Fuller wished to build a sustainable autonomous single family dwelling, the living machine of the future. Although never built, the Dymaxion's design displayed forward-thinking and influential innovations in prefabrication and sustainability. Not only would the house have been exemplary in its self-sufficiency, but it also could have been mass-produced, flat-packaged and shipped throughout the world.

More on this revolutionary design after the break...

via www.trumanlibrary.org model via scene.org © MoMA © The Estate of R. Buckminster Fuller, via myipamm.net + 18

Celebrate Buckminster Fuller's Legacy with Never-Before-Seen Posters

06:00 - 6 September, 2018
via Edward Cella Art and Architecture
via Edward Cella Art and Architecture

R. Buckminster Fuller remains, 35 years after his passing, one of architecture’s preeminent minds. His proposals in construction, housing, mapping, and even transportation have a continued influence in the fields of architecture and engineering today, despite many of them having been designed nearly a century ago.

Car Talk Deems Buckminster Fuller's Dymaxion Car a Complete Failure

17:00 - 4 May, 2015
Car Talk Deems Buckminster Fuller's Dymaxion Car a Complete Failure , via ArchDaily
via ArchDaily

Car Talk has written a scathing review on Buckminster Fuller's three-wheeled Dymaxion Car, 81 years after its unveiling. The famed architect and inventor, known best for his geodesic dome, hoped to revolutionize the car industry with a three-wheeled, 20 foot-long, "highly aerodynamic" reinvention of the car.

AD Round Up: Unbuilt Classics

00:00 - 14 August, 2013
AD Round Up: Unbuilt Classics, The Plug-In City by Peter Cook, 1964. Image via Archigram Archives
The Plug-In City by Peter Cook, 1964. Image via Archigram Archives

This AD Round Up is dedicated to unbuilt classics, a selection of projects and ideas that, although never built, contributed greatly to the canon of twentieth century architecture. In 1920, Buckminister Fuller designed the Dymaxion House, which displayed forward-thinking innovations in sustainability and prefabrication. In 1924, Le Corbusier’s radical plan for Ville Radieuse (The Radiant City) had an extensive influence upon modern urban planning and led to the development of new high-density housing typologies. In the same year Friedrick Kiesler introduced his "Endless House", the basis for his subsequent manifesto of Correalism. Eight years later in 1932, Philip Johnson and Henry-Russell Hitchcock curated the “Modern Architecture: International exhibition” at the MoMA, introducing the emerging International Style and laying the principles for Modern architecture. And finally, one of Archigram’s most famous utopian visions, the Plug-In City, proposed by Peter Cook in 1964, offered a fascinating new approach to urbanism and reversed traditional perceptions of infrastructure’s role in the city.