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Industrial Architecture: The Latest Architecture and News

Hasanpaşa Gasworks Park and Museum Complex / İTÜ & DS Architecture

© Cemal Emden© Cemal Emden© Cemal Emden© Cemal Emden+ 32

Industrial Landscapes: Large-Scale Factories Seen from Above

Historically, industrialization means a process of economic change that transforms an agrarian society, with mostly handicraft techniques, into an industrial society to increase productivity and economic growth. This mechanization and mass production leads to deep social transformations, but the most significant consequence is an enormous change in the urban landscape.

Created by @overview Source imagery @maxartechnologiesCreated by @overview Source imagery @maxartechnologiesCourtesy of Daily OverviewCourtesy of Daily Overview+ 11

ATES Wind Power Headquarters / d.a.architects

© ZM Yasa© ZM Yasa© ZM Yasa© ZM Yasa+ 37

  • Architects: d.a.architects
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  2806
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2019
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: Spectral, VitrA, AGT SOFT TOUCH, U GLASS FACADE

Modular Components in Industrial Architecture

Seville Cruise Terminal Phase 2 / Hombre de Piedra Arquitectos + Buró 4. Photo: © Jesús GranadaWhite Shed / Atelier 111 Architekti. Photo: © Alex Shoots BuildingsMariposa Land Port of Entry / Jones Studio. Photo: © Bill TimmermanMilagrito Mezcal Pavilion / AMBROSI I ETCHEGARAY. Photo: © Onnis Luque+ 27

Industrial architecture usually requires fast installation, low-maintenance components, and flexible spaces that can be used for different purposes. Therefore, modular solutions are very common in this type of construction, also adding a powerful visual language to the building.

Involve / bandesign

© Yasuko Okamura, Shigetomo Mizuno© Yasuko Okamura, Shigetomo Mizuno© Yasuko Okamura, Shigetomo Mizuno© Yasuko Okamura, Shigetomo Mizuno+ 24

Is It Time To Start Thinking About Wooden Industrial Buildings?

Industrial buildings are among the best examples of Louis Sullivan's famous phrase "form follows function." Generally, they are functional, efficient buildings, quick to build and unornamented. That is why, when we study the industrial heritage of different cities and countries, we are able to understand local materials, technologies, and traditional construction methods of the time. England's red brick factories come to mind, as well as the roof lanterns used to provide natural light to factories and other typical construction elements. Metallic and precast concrete structures are currently the most commonly used due to a combination of construction efficiency, cost, the possibility of expansive spans, and the unawareness of the benefits of other materials, such as wood. Often, these industrial warehouses are also characterized by being cold and impersonal, in addition to having a considerable carbon footprint. But Canada's experience in recent years is noteworthy, where there have been an increasing number of wooden buildings constructed for industrial programs.

Equestrian Centre / Carlos Castanheira + Clara Bastai

© Fernando Guerra |  FG+SG© Fernando Guerra |  FG+SG© Fernando Guerra |  FG+SG© Fernando Guerra |  FG+SG+ 55

Gemak Shipyard Administration Office / CM Mimarlık

© Cemal Emden© Cemal Emden© Cemal Emden© Cemal Emden+ 30

Vejlskovgaard Stable / LUMO Architects

Courtesy of LUMO Architects Courtesy of LUMO Architects Courtesy of LUMO Architects Courtesy of LUMO Architects + 18

Odder, Denmark
  • Architects: LUMO Architects
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  8800
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2012

Xiang Jing + Qu Guangci Sculpture Studio / aterlier100s+1

© Zeng Renzhen© Zeng Renzhen© Zeng Renzhen© Zeng Renzhen+ 21

  • Architects: aterlier100s+1
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  1257
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2013

China's Mega Industrial Regeneration Project has Lessons for the World

Across the world, developed cities are rebelling against heavy industry. While some reasons vary depending on local circumstances, a common global drive towards clean energy, and the shifting of developed economies towards financial services, automation, and the gig economy, is leaving a common trace within urban centers. From Beijing to Detroit, vast wastelands of steel and concrete will stand as empty relics to the age of steel and coal.

The question of what to do with these wastelands, with defunct furnaces, railways, chimneys, and lakes, may be one of the major urban questions facing generations of architects to come. What can be done when the impracticality of industrial complexes, and the precious land they needlessly occupy, collides with the embodied energy, memories, and histories which few would wish to lose?

Courtesy of CCTN DesignCourtesy of CCTN DesignCourtesy of CCTN DesignCourtesy of CCTN Design+ 20

Shanghai Modern Art Museum / Atelier Deshaus

© Fangfang Tian© Fangfang Tian© Fangfang Tian© Fangfang Tian+ 44

Chongqing Awe-inspiring Bar / B.L.U.E. Architecture Design Studio

© Guanbo Li© Guanbo Li© Guanbo Li© Guanbo Li+ 24

New Forms of Industry: Shed #19 by Andrea Oliva Architetto

© Laurian Ghinitoiu© Laurian Ghinitoiu© Laurian Ghinitoiu© Laurian Ghinitoiu+ 23

Research is the key to Andrea Oliva’s project for Shed #19—not only because this old factory was turned into a technopole for industrial investigation, but also because the architect’s proposal used research as a way of identifying the building’s possible transformations. In this case, the rich industrial history of the plant and the area is deemed essential for its refurbishment; its recovery depends on understanding its significance.

Kengo Kuma Transforms Shanghai Shipyard Into Multi-Use Complex

In the Lujiazui financial district in Pudong, Shanghai, Kengo Kuma has reimagined a 1972 shipyard into a new 9,000-square-meter multi-use complex, named Shipyard 1862. Behind original, rugged brick walls, the old shipyard was once defined by a 12 by 30-meter grid, which allowed for massive interior spaces to hold ships. In this industrial-style adaptive reuse project, Kuma was careful to preserve the building’s structural and material integrity. These photographs provided by Julien Lanoo show how the industrial shell has been transformed by the refurbishment project.

Renovation of Xi'an Dahua Textile Mill / China Architecture Design Group Land-based Rationalism D.R.C

Aerial. Image © Frederic Henriques
Aerial. Image © Frederic Henriques

© Guangyuan Zhang© Guangyuan Zhang© Guangyuan Zhang© Guangyuan Zhang+ 65

Margot Krasojević Designs Bridge That Sails Like a Ship

Dr. Margot Krasojević, known for creating impossibly futuristic architecture has unveiled her latest project: a bridge that can sail across the water. Dubbed the “Revolving Sail Bridge” - the experimental project was commissioned by the Ordos government in the Kanbashi District of Inner Mongolia (China) to be built across the Wulamulum River. Featuring a main floating section topped with a carbon-fibre triple sail, the flexible structure is capable of sailing anywhere across the river to relocate itself.

© Margot Krasojević© Margot Krasojević© Margot Krasojević© Margot Krasojević+ 20