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Art Exhibition

MAD Revitalizes Abandoned Japanese Mountain Tunnel with Elemental Art Trail

16:00 - 6 August, 2018
MAD Revitalizes Abandoned Japanese Mountain Tunnel with Elemental Art Trail, Light Cave (Water). Image Courtesy of Nacasa & Partners Inc
Light Cave (Water). Image Courtesy of Nacasa & Partners Inc

MAD Architects have completed their restoration work on the Kiyotsu Gorge Tunnel in Japan’s Niigata prefecture, transforming the historic lookout tunnel into a trail of artistic spaces. The “Tunnel of Light” was opened as part of the 2018 Echigo-Tsumari Triennale, cutting through 750 meters of rock formations to offer a panoramic view across one of Japan’s great landscapes.

MAD’s scheme seeks to “transform points along the historic tunnel through the realization of several architectural spaces and artistic atmospheres." Inspired by the five elements of wood, earth, metal, fire, and water, the scheme explores the relationship between humans and nature, and "re-connects locals and visitors alike with the majestic beauty of the land."

Periscope (Wood). Image Courtesy of Nacasa & Partners Inc The Drop (Fire). Image Courtesy of Nacasa & Partners Inc The Drop (Fire). Image Courtesy of Nacasa & Partners Inc Expression of Color (Earth). Image Courtesy of Nacasa & Partners Inc + 22

Full-Size Replica of Le Corbusier's Villa Savoye Sunk in Danish Fjord

12:00 - 31 July, 2018
Full-Size Replica of Le Corbusier's Villa Savoye Sunk in Danish Fjord, Courtesy of Asmund Havsteen-Mikkelsen
Courtesy of Asmund Havsteen-Mikkelsen

A giant replica of Le Corbusier’s iconic Villa Savoye has been half-sunk off a Danish fjord as part of the country’s Floating Art 2018 festival. The installation titled “Flooding Modernity” has been designed by artist Asmund Havsteen-Mikkelsen as a “comment on the sinking of the public sphere after the disclosure of the Cambridge Analytica scandal and the manipulation of democratic elections through social media.”

As part of the summer art festival hosted by the city of Vejle and the Veijle Art Museum, the five-tonne model was towed into the fjord and sunk to sit as a half-submerged testament to a once visionary future.

Courtesy of Asmund Havsteen-Mikkelsen Courtesy of Asmund Havsteen-Mikkelsen Courtesy of Asmund Havsteen-Mikkelsen Courtesy of Asmund Havsteen-Mikkelsen + 15

MoMA to Host Exhibit Celebrating the Radical Brutalist Architecture of Socialist Yugoslavia

08:00 - 6 July, 2018
MoMA to Host Exhibit Celebrating the Radical Brutalist Architecture of Socialist Yugoslavia, Berislav Šerbetić and Vojin Bakić. Monument to the Uprising of the People of Kordun and Banija. 1979–81. Petrova Gora, Croatia. Exterior view. Photo: Valentin Jeck, commissioned by The Museum of Modern Art, 2016
Berislav Šerbetić and Vojin Bakić. Monument to the Uprising of the People of Kordun and Banija. 1979–81. Petrova Gora, Croatia. Exterior view. Photo: Valentin Jeck, commissioned by The Museum of Modern Art, 2016

The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) is set to open a new exhibition exploring the architecture of the former country of Yugoslavia. Toward a Concrete Utopia: Architecture in Yugoslavia, 1948–1980 will be the first exhibition in the United States to honor the peculiar architecture of the former socialist nation.

More than 400 drawings, models, photographs, and film reels culled from an array of municipal archives, family-held collections, and museums across the region will be presented to an international audience for the first time. Toward a Concrete Utopia will feature works by many of Yugoslavia's leading architects. It will explore "large-scale urbanization, technological experimentation and its application in everyday life, consumerism, monuments and memorialization, and the global reach of Yugoslav architecture."

Read on for more about the exhibition and Yugoslav brutalism.

 Svetlana Kana Radević. Podgorica Hotel. 1964–67. Podgorica, Montenegro. Exterior view of the balconies. Photo: Valentin Jeck, commissioned by The Museum of Modern Art, 2016 odrag Živković and Đorđe Zloković. Monument to the Battle of the Sutjeska. 1965–71, Tjentište, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Photo: Valentin Jeck, commissioned by The Museum of Modern Art, 2016  Vjenceslav Richter. Yugoslav Pavilion at Expo 58. 1958. Brussels, Belgium. Archive of Yugoslavia Andrija Mutnjaković. National and University Library of Kosovo. 1971–82. Prishtina, Kosovo. Exterior view. Photo: Valentin Jeck, commissioned by the Museum of Modern Art, 2016 + 15

2018 Young Architects Program Exhibition Opens at MoMA PS1 in New York

12:00 - 28 June, 2018
2018 Young Architects Program Exhibition Opens at MoMA PS1 in New York, Hide & Seek by Dream The Combine for The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1’s Young Architects Program 2018, on view at MoMA PS1 from June 28 to September 3, 2018. Image courtesy MoMA PS1. Photo by Pablo Enriquez.
Hide & Seek by Dream The Combine for The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1’s Young Architects Program 2018, on view at MoMA PS1 from June 28 to September 3, 2018. Image courtesy MoMA PS1. Photo by Pablo Enriquez.

The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) has opened its exhibition of the Young Architects Program 2018 at its MoMA PS1 location in Long Island City, New York. Now in its 19th edition, the Young Architects Program offers emerging talent in the architectural world the opportunity to “design and present innovative projects, challenging each year’s winners to develop creative designs for a temporary, outdoor installation that provides shade, seating, and water.”

The winning project this year was “Hide & Seek” by Jennifer Newsom and Tom Carruthers of Dream The Combine, working on collaboration with Clayton Binkey of ARUP.

Hide & Seek by Dream The Combine for The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1’s Young Architects Program 2018, on view at MoMA PS1 from June 28 to September 3, 2018. Image courtesy MoMA PS1. Photo by Pablo Enriquez. Hide & Seek by Dream The Combine for The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1’s Young Architects Program 2018, on view at MoMA PS1 from June 28 to September 3, 2018. Image courtesy MoMA PS1. Photo by Pablo Enriquez. Hide & Seek by Dream The Combine for The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1’s Young Architects Program 2018, on view at MoMA PS1 from June 28 to September 3, 2018. Image courtesy MoMA PS1. Photo by Pablo Enriquez. Hide & Seek by Dream The Combine for The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1’s Young Architects Program 2018, on view at MoMA PS1 from June 28 to September 3, 2018. Image courtesy MoMA PS1. Photo by Pablo Enriquez. + 6

Experience Time in Color With Emmanuelle Moureaux

06:00 - 24 January, 2018
Experience Time in Color With Emmanuelle Moureaux, © Daisuke Shima
© Daisuke Shima

Architect Emmanuelle Moureaux’s latest art experience, “COLOR OF TIME,” allows observers to experience the passage of time through color. Moureaux’s installation is one of a series called, “Art and Design, dialogue with materials,” for Toyama Prefectural Museum of Art & Design’s opening ceremonies. Throughout the series artists played with different materials, showing their varying potentials and characteristics.

Moureaux chose paper; layering over 100,000 number cutouts into a 3D grid. From sunrise at 6:30 to 19:49, the numbers turn over 100 shades of color, ending in black. A color changing experience totaling 799 minutes.

Parallax Gap - American Architecture Celebrated on Smithsonian Gallery Ceilings

12:00 - 4 June, 2017
Courtesy of Kevin Kunstadt
Courtesy of Kevin Kunstadt

Art is not confined to gallery walls. The concept of art displayed on ceilings stretches back to the Renaissance, perhaps most notably the Sistine Chapel ceiling by Michelangelo. The Renaissance tradition of Trompel’oeil ceilings went further, using an illusionary depth of perspective to depict a volume which doesn’t exist; be it a dome that was never built or an attic filled with angels.

Four hundred years later, New York and Los Angeles-based architecture firm FreelandBuck has elevated the concept with its upcoming installation ‘Parallax Gap’, which has been selected by the Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian American Art Museum as the winning entry in a competition entitled ‘ABOVE the Renwick’. From July 2017 to February 2018, the 2,500sqft canopy will be suspended from the ceiling of the Renwick’s largest room, the Bettie Rubenstein Grand Salon, depicting an abstract catalog of American architectural icons.

Courtesy of Kevin Kunstadt Courtesy of Kevin Kunstadt Courtesy of Kevin Kunstadt Courtesy of Kevin Kunstadt + 17