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Architectural Drawings: The Latest Architecture and News

Reaffirming the Essential Role of Drawing in Design

This article was originally published on Common Edge.

In 2012, the Yale School of Architecture held a conference on the topic of drawing. It posed a couple of provocative questions: Was the study and practice of architecture already beyond it? Was it is even necessary to draw in order to be an architect? Mark Alan Hewitt’s new book, Draw in Order to See (ORO Editions), is a resounding affirmation that not only must architects draw, they cannot help but do so—it’s like breathing. The connection between the hand and the eye, between a soft pencil and a toothy sheaf of paper, is how architects, in fact, “see.”

A Planned Reprint of a Popular Book on Louis Kahn Brings His Drawings within Reach

There are plenty of books about the buildings of late American architect Louis I. Kahn, including those he authored. But his drawings hold a special fascination for his peers and fans, which explains why the blog Designers and Books is launching a Kickstarter to fund the reissue of one 1962 compilation of his sketches, which has been out of print for decades.

"Thom Mayne: Sculptural Drawings" Opens at the Museum for Architectural Drawing in Berlin

Running from 11 September till 15 November 2020, "Thom Mayne: Sculptural Drawings" is the latest architectural exhibition at Tchoban Foundation Museum for Architectural Drawing in Berlin. Curated by Kristin Feireiss, together with Esenija Bannan, the project questions the nature of architectural drawing and how it influenced the work of Thom Mayne, founder of Morphosis. The exhibition features Mayne’s works dating from 1979 through 2020 and leads visitors from “traditional” drawings and new experimentations with techniques, through to 3D paintings.

Lawrence Residence, Hermosa Beach, USA 1980. Image Courtesy of Thom MayneBerlin Wall 1986. Image Courtesy of Thom MayneSkizzenbuch / Sketchbook 1994/95. Image Courtesy of Thom MayneCrawford Residence, Montecito, USA 1989. Image Courtesy of Thom Mayne+ 12

Une Ville Dessinée

The future of the European city is the central theme for Sergei Tchoban. It is evident that the language of contemporary architecture and the size of urban gestures contrast with the structure of the historical or traditional European city. Is it possible to harmonize and regulate these two positions? Is there a quality in the spontaneity or even in the chaos that can arise?

The exhibition ‚Une Ville Dessinée / A Drawn City‘ reflects the high-contrast interplay between historical and modern architecture, as it is so strongly traced in modern cities. It brings together visualized and constructed ideas on paper, presents

The Best Architecture Drawings of 2019

BLVD InternationalPezo Von EllrichshausenTatiana BilbaoNicole Moyo+ 77

We are continuing our five-year-long tradition of celebrating “The Best Architecture Drawings of the Year.” The 2019 edition sees a carefully-curated collection of architectural drawings with a wide variety of techniques and representations, all orientated towards a common goal of sharing architectural ideas, visions, and designs.

Prized Hand-Drawings Return a Building to an Organically Conceived Whole

A century on, the compelling idea that Modern architecture emerged like some blindingly white, crystalline and disruptive phoenix from the darkness, death and destruction of the First World War is, perhaps, a familiar one. And, yet, the charcoal sketches and chiaroscuro montages Mies van der Rohe made during and after the epochal competition for the Berlin Friedrichstrasse Skyscraper of 1921-22 retain the power to catch the eye, provoke and disturb in our own era of overwhelming imagery much of it produced by and with computer programs.

What is so very remarkable about these century-old visionary drawings is that they portray a future building type - verging on the ethereal and more or less impossible to realize at the time - in the earthiest of drawing materials. It had been a stroke of genius to use charcoal to evoke an architecture of lightness rising from the embers of the trenches that would revolutionize the way we shaped tall buildings and with them our city streets. Such is the power of drawing by hand.

Anneke Vervoort, Landschaftspark, Duisburg, Germany, 2016, India ink and watercolour, 13 x 19 3/4 inChris Dove, Rooves of Venice, 2015, Pen and ink, 27 1/2 x 19 3/4 inNataly Eliseeva, City dovecote, architectural fantasy, 2010, Pen and ink, 7 7/8 x 11 3/4 inStefan Davidovici, Imaginary Jerusalem, 3, 2010, Ink on paper, 8 1/4 x 11 3/4 in+ 7

Studying the "Manual of Section": Architecture's Most Intriguing Drawing

For Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki and David J. Lewis, the section “is often understood as a reductive drawing type, produced at the end of the design process to depict structural and material conditions in service of the construction contract.” A definition that will be familiar to most of those who have studied or worked in architecture at some point. We often think primarily of the plan, for it allows us to embrace the programmatic expectations of a project and provide a summary of the various functions required. In the modern age, digital modelling software programs offer ever more possibilities when it comes to creating complex three dimensional objects, making the section even more of an afterthought.

With their Manual of Section (2016), the three founding partners of LTL architects engage with section as an essential tool of architectural design, and let’s admit it, this reading might change your mind on the topic. For the co-authors, “thinking and designing through section requires the building of a discourse about section, recognizing it as a site of intervention.” Perhaps, indeed, we need to understand the capabilities of section drawings both to use them more efficiently and to enjoy doing so.

Bagsværd Church by Jørn Utzon (1976). Published in Manual of Section by Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, and David J. Lewis published by Princeton Architectural Press (2016). Image Courtesy of LTL ArchitectsNotre Dame du Haut by Le Corbusier (1954). Published in Manual of Section by Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, and David J. Lewis published by Princeton Architectural Press (2016). Image Courtesy of LTL ArchitectsUnited States Pavilion at Expo '67 by Buckminster Fuller and Shoji Sadao (1967). Published in Manual of Section by Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, and David J. Lewis published by Princeton Architectural Press (2016). Image Courtesy of LTL ArchitectsThe Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum by Frank Lloyd Wright (1959). Published in Manual of Section by Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, and David J. Lewis published by Princeton Architectural Press (2016). Image Courtesy of LTL Architects+ 15

No Architectural Media Communicates Atmosphere and Ambiance as Compellingly as Film

Today, the overlap of the tools and software products utilized by filmmakers and architects reinforces the historical bond between the two disciplines more than ever. In one of their design studios, Master of Architecture students at the Melbourne School of Design try to master the techniques and methods of filmmaking and employ them in their architectural films and animations.

Pdda: A Series of Small Architectural Drawings

Italian architect Gaetano Boccia has been researching drawings and architectural representation for the past two years. The Pdda (piccoli disegni di architettura) project was born with the intention of sharing Boccia's thoughts, which he has always cataloged and kept in notebooks.

Referring to no particular buildings, these drawings are part of an inspirational process that takes place in the architect's daily context and complex surroundings of Naples and Italian culture.

Courtesy of Gaetano BocciaCourtesy of Gaetano BocciaCourtesy of Gaetano BocciaCourtesy of Gaetano Boccia+ 25

Detailed Globe Drawings of Cities Around the World by Amer Ismail

Amer Ismail, architect-turned-artist based in London, has developed a spectacular set of intricate “Globe Drawings” of cities around the world. Beginning in 2016, Ismail developed these 5-point-perspective drawings with heavy inspiration from artist Stephen Wiltshire. Having spent many years drawings architecture, including time at Foster+Partners, Ismail tasked himself with developing a series that encompassed his “interest for architecture, city planning, travel, drawings, and Star Wars.”

© Amer Ismail© Amer Ismail© Amer Ismail© Amer Ismail+ 9

"MAKE IT ISO!", A Series of Isometrics Based on Iconic Movies and TV Series

© Riccardo Masiero© Riccardo Masiero© Riccardo Masiero© Riccardo Masiero+ 13

The passion for cinema and TV shows, combined with that for scenography and architecture, led Italian architect Riccardo Masiero to play with the different spaces and dimensions of the elements that make movies in order to create "MAKE IT ISO!", a series of drawings portraying famous movies and TV icons such as Breaking Bad, Twin Peaks, Harry Potter, Star Wars, The Shining and UP in an architectural way.

These illustrations represent iconic scenes of TV and cinema through the isometric illustration method, giving an overall picture of the construction of the scene, as well as providing a different point of view to the observer.  

Keep reading to see the full "MAKE IT ISO!" series and the author explaining his work.

The Creative Process of Zaha Hadid, As Revealed Through Her Paintings

Vision for Madrid - 1992. Image Cortesía de Zaha Hadid
Vision for Madrid - 1992. Image Cortesía de Zaha Hadid

Internationally renowned for her avant-garde search for architectural proposals that reflect modern living, Zaha Hadid made abstract topographical studies for many of her projects, intervening with fluid, flexible and expressive works that evoke the dynamism of contemporary urban life.

In order to further knowledge of her creative process and the development of her professional projects, here we have made a historic selection of her paintings which expand the field of architectural exploration through abstract exercises in three dimensions. These artistic works propose a new and different world view, questioning the physical constraints of design, and showing the creative underpinnings of her career.

The Peak - 1983. Image Cortesía de Zaha Hadid The World (89 Degrees) - 1983. Image Cortesía de Zaha Hadid Great Utopias - 1992. Image Cortesía de Zaha Hadid Hafenstrasse Development. Image Cortesía de Zaha Hadid + 34

The Best Architectural Drawings of 2018

With the mission of providing tools and inspiration to architects all around the world, ArchDaily’s curators are constantly searching for new projects, ideas and forms of expression. For the past three years, ArchDaily has showcased the best discoveries of each year, and in keeping with tradition, we would like to share the best architecture drawings published throughout 2018.

What is the role of contemporary drawing in architecture? We approach the definition of drawing as design itself. Drawings are used to explain principles, to deliver ideas, to construct new architecture, and to document creative processes.
Below you will see the selection of drawings arranged under six categories: Context, Architectural Drawings, Sketches & Hand-drawn, Digital Collages, Conceptual Drawings & Diagrams and Animated Gifs. Each chosen drawing strengthens the proposed construction or enhances the built work.

We also invite you to review collections from previous years here or other drawing-related posts selected by our editors in the following link.

A Selection of the Best Architecture Sketches: Rogelio Ruiz Fernández

An active ArchDaily collaborator, architect and doctor Rogelio Ruiz Fernández, has emerged as a great enthusiast of cinema, architecture, cities and landscapes. He expresses his love for visual arts, architecture, and culture through his drawings. In these moments, he documents trips, his favorite locales, and project ideas that will later become works of architecture.

Below, Ruiz Fernandez explains his creative process and the importance of sketches in his work. 

Building Drawings/Drawing Buildings: The Works of Sergei Tchoban

A drawing should be a key to the understanding of architecture – what is there to like or dislike, where do architects’ ideas come from, how do these ideas make it to paper, and what is important in this process.” - Sergei Tchoban

For the past month the Russian-German architect, artist, and collector Sergei Tchoban has been the focus of the exhibition, Sergei Tchoban: Drawing Buildings/Building Drawings, bringing together fifty of the architect’s large-scale urban fantasy drawings. These drawings, while intriguing for their technical and artistic value, also reflect Tchoban's deeply personal contemplations about the past, present, and future of his favorite cities - Saint Petersburg, Rome, Amsterdam, Venice, Berlin, New York – along with in-depth documentation of five realized projects (two museums, two exhibition pavilions, and a theater stage design.)

© Vasily Bulanov© Vasily Bulanov© Courtesy of Sergei Tchoban© Courtesy of Sergei Tchoban+ 24

Drawing Tips for Getting the Most Out of Your Apple Pencil

Want to get the most of your Apple Pencil in Trace? Today, Rome Prize winner Javier Galindo, is going to show you a few features that will make your Trace drawings sing.

World Architecture Festival Calls for Entries for 2018 Architecture Drawing Prize

In partnership with Make Architects and Sir John Soane’s Museum, the World Architecture Festival (WAF) has announced the call for entries for the second edition of The Architecture Drawing Prize. Launched in 2017, the prize is conceived to celebrate and showcase the significance of drawing as a tool in capturing and communicating architectural ideas.

The Architecture Drawing Prize embraces the creative use of digital tools and digitally-produced renderings, while recognising the enduring importance of hand drawing. The organisers invite entries of all types and forms: from technical or construction drawings to cutaway or perspective views – and anything in between.