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Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios Wins Competition for University of Warwick Arts Hub

12:00 - 21 February, 2017
Courtesy of RIBA Competitions
Courtesy of RIBA Competitions

Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios has been selected as the winners of the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) competition to design the new Faculty of Arts Building at the University of Warwick, in Coventry, England. Lauded for its flexibility and collaboration-fostering design, the winning proposal was selected over finalist entries from Foster + Partners, Grimshaw, White Arkitekter and Wilkinson Eyre.

Francis Kéré to Design 2017 Serpentine Pavilion

07:30 - 21 February, 2017
Francis Kéré to Design 2017 Serpentine Pavilion, Serpentine Pavilion 2017, Designed by Francis Kéré, Design Render, Interior. Image © Kéré Architecture
Serpentine Pavilion 2017, Designed by Francis Kéré, Design Render, Interior. Image © Kéré Architecture

The Serpentine Galleries have announced that the 2017 Serpentine Pavilion will be designed by Diébédo Francis Kéré (Kéré Architecture), an African architect based between Berlin, Germany, and his home town of Gando in Burkino Faso. The design for the proposal, which will be built this summer in London's Kensington Gardens, comprises an expansive roof supported by a steel frame, mimicking the canopy of a tree. According to Kéré, the design for the roof stems from a tree that serves as the central meeting point for life in Gando. In line with the criteria for the selection of the Serpentine Pavilion architect Kéré has yet to have realised a permanent building in England.

Open Call: Architecture Fringe 2017

15:59 - 20 February, 2017
Open Call: Architecture Fringe 2017, Architecture Fringe 2017 Open Call Credit: Architecture Fringe
Architecture Fringe 2017 Open Call Credit: Architecture Fringe

The Architecture Fringe 2017 is open for project proposals to take place in Scotland during July 2017.

Initiated by a group of architects, photographers, engineers, landscape architects, visual artists, curators and musicians the Architecture Fringe is an independent, contributor-led open platform for new work and projects across the arts which explore architecture and how it makes a difference to our lives.

5 Finalists Selected for the 2017 EU Prize for Contemporary Architecture - Mies van der Rohe Award

08:15 - 15 February, 2017
5 Finalists Selected for the 2017 EU Prize for Contemporary Architecture - Mies van der Rohe Award

Five European projects have been selected as finalists for the 2017 EU Prize for Contemporary Architecture - Mies van der Rohe Award. Chosen from a shortlist of 40 projects, the five finalists were lauded by the jury for their ability to “respond to the concerns of today’s European society.”

“Our instincts could be summed up by the words of Peter Smithson: ‘things need to be ordinary and heroic at the same time,’” said Jury Chairman Stephen Bates. “We were looking for an ordinariness whose understated lyricism is full of potential’.”

Through April, the jury members will visit each finalist project to evaluate the buildings firsthand and to see how they are used by the public. The Prize Winner will be announced in Brussels on May 16.

The five finalists are:

Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners Tipped to Extend London's Iconic British Library Complex

08:05 - 14 February, 2017
Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners Tipped to Extend London's Iconic British Library Complex, Courtesy of British Library
Courtesy of British Library

As reported by the Architects' Journal, Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners (RSHP)—the London-based practice led by Richard Rogers—have been selected, "following a developer-led competition," to expand the iconic British Library complex in London – designed by Colin St. John Wilson in 1962 and eventually completed in 1997. The national library is widely considered to be the largest public building ever constructed in the United Kingdom over the course of the 20th Century. In 2015, the buildings were awarded the highest level of Listed (protection) status.

Mies van der Rohe's Tower in London That Never Was

07:00 - 6 February, 2017
Mies van der Rohe's Tower in London That Never Was, Vizualisation. Image Courtesy Drawing Matter, REAL foundation. Image © John Donat
Vizualisation. Image Courtesy Drawing Matter, REAL foundation. Image © John Donat

In the 1960s James Stirling asked Ludwig Mies van der Rohe why he didn’t design utopian visions for new societies, like those of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Broadacre City or Corbusier’s Cité Radieuse. Mies replied that he wasn’t interested in fantasies, but only in “making the existing city beautiful.” When Stirling recounted the conversation several decades later it was to the audience of a public enquiry convened in London – he was desperately trying to save Mies’ only UK design from being rejected in planning.

It couldn’t be done: the scheme went unbuilt; the drawings were buried in a private archive. Now, for the first time in more than thirty years, Mies’ Mansion House Square will be presented to the public in both a forthcoming exhibition at the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA)—Mies van der Rohe and James Stirling: Circling the Square—and, if it is successful, a book currently being funded through Kickstarter by the REAL foundation.

Vizualisation. Image Courtesy Drawing Matter, REAL foundation. Image © John Donat Interior vizualisation. Image Courtesy Drawing Matter, REAL foundation. Image © John Donat Urban plan. Image Courtesy Drawing Matter, REAL foundation. Image © John Donat Vizualisation. Image Courtesy Drawing Matter, REAL foundation. Image © John Donat +5

Zaha Hadid's "Explosive" Paintings, Drawings and Sketches Are Now on Display in London

14:15 - 3 February, 2017

In a recent episiode of Section DMonocle 24 visit a new exhibition at London's Serpentine Galleries presenting the paintings of Zaha Hadid. The show, first conceived with Hadid herself, "reveals her as an artist with drawing at the very heart of her work." According to the gallery, it "includes the architect’s calligraphic drawings and rarely seen private notebooks with sketches that reveal her complex thoughts about architectural forms and their relationships." This episode takes the listener on a tour of the display with commentary from the exhibition's curator.

Santiago Calatrava Reveals £1 Billion Mixed-Use Project in London

09:00 - 2 February, 2017
Santiago Calatrava Reveals £1 Billion Mixed-Use Project in London, © Uniform
© Uniform

Santiago Calatrava has unveiled designs for a £1-billion mixed-use project in Greenwich Peninsula, East London. Named Peninsula Place, the 1.4-million-square-foot (130,000-square-meter) project will be located adjacent to the Roger Stirk Harbour + Partners-designed O2 Arena (formerly known as the Millennium Dome). It will include a new tube and bus station, a theater, cinema and performance venue, bars, shops and a wellbeing hub on the lower levels, with three towers rising above featuring offices, hotels, and apartments. The scheme will also be served by a new land bridge, also designed by Calatrava.

The "Galleria" will offer a promenade full of shops, restaurants and cafes. Image © Uniform The new footbridge will connect Peninsula Place to the rest of the Greenwich Peninsula. Image © Uniform The "winter garden" at the center of the design will welcome arrivals from the London Underground. Image © Uniform © Uniform +6

10 Shortlisted Designs for London Holocaust Memorial Revealed

09:45 - 27 January, 2017
10 Shortlisted Designs for London Holocaust Memorial Revealed

The UK Holocaust Memorial Foundation and Malcolm Reading Consultants have revealed the designs of 10 teams shortlisted to design a new Holocaust Memorial, to be located in London's Victoria Tower Gardens next to the Houses of Parliament. After a call for expressions of interest was launched in September, 10 star-studded teams were selected in November and invited to submit their designs for an "emotionally powerful and sensitively designed memorial."

With the designs now revealed to the public, competition organizer Malcolm Reading Consultants and the government-led Memorial Foundation are now consulting with the public and are inviting people to submit feedback about the designs here. The feedback received in this consultation period "will play a crucial role in informing the jury’s final decision on the memorial," they explained in a press release. Read on to see all 10 shortlisted designs.

AD Classics: Park Hill Estate / Jack Lynn and Ivor Smith

04:00 - 27 January, 2017
AD Classics: Park Hill Estate / Jack Lynn and Ivor Smith, © Wikimedia user/Flickr user Paolo Margari (licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0)
© Wikimedia user/Flickr user Paolo Margari (licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0)

From its hilltop vantage point in the east end of Sheffield, UK, the Park Hill Estate surveys the post-industrial city which sprawls westwards. Its prominent location makes the estate highly visible and it has, over time, become engrained in the popular consciousness – a part of the fabric of the city. Although today it divides opinion, following its completion in 1961 it was hailed as an exemplary model for social housing. Designed by architects Jack Lynn and Ivor Smith under the supervision of Sheffield’s visionary City Architect John Lewis Womersley, the estate now stands as testament to an era when young British architects were revolutionizing the field of residential architecture with radical housing programs.

The Park Hill Estate was part of Womersley’s strategy to introduce more high-density housing to Sheffield, which he believed would foster a stronger sense of community than the ubiquitous back-to-back terraces.[1] This policy went hand in hand with an urgent need for slum clearance; The Park, a slum so notorious for its high crime rate that it was known locally as ‘Little Chicago,’ was demolished to make way for the estate.

After renovation. Image © Paul Dobraszczyk © Paul Dobraszczyk © Paul Dobraszczyk © Paul Dobraszczyk +17

Belsize Architects Creates Pavilion Residences for Oxford University Students

14:00 - 22 January, 2017
Belsize Architects Creates Pavilion Residences for Oxford University Students , Courtesy of Belsize Architects
Courtesy of Belsize Architects

Belsize Architects has released the plans for 6 Pavilions, a new student accommodation project that will form a part of the University College’s larger masterplan in north Oxford.  

To be built on the site of a Victorian residential home, the project will feature 30 units arranged within six pavilions around a central courtyard. Communal areas of the pavilions will be connected at the ground level.

Courtesy of Belsize Architects Courtesy of Belsize Architects Courtesy of Belsize Architects Courtesy of Belsize Architects +13

OMA's £110 million Arts Center in Manchester Receives Planning Approval

14:00 - 16 January, 2017
OMA's £110 million Arts Center in Manchester Receives Planning Approval, Courtesy of Factory Manchester
Courtesy of Factory Manchester

OMA’s first major public building in the UK has been granted planning approval. Known as “Factory,” the groundbreaking new cultural center will serve as a the new home of the Manchester International Festival (MIF) and as a year-round concert and arts venue.

Courtesy of Factory Manchester Courtesy of Factory Manchester Courtesy of Factory Manchester Courtesy of Factory Manchester +9

Herzog & de Meuron's Chelsea FC Stadium Receives Council Approval

14:00 - 12 January, 2017
Herzog & de Meuron's Chelsea FC Stadium Receives Council Approval, © Herzog & de Meuron
© Herzog & de Meuron

Herzog & de Meuron’s Chelsea Football Club stadium has been given approval by Hammersmith and Fulham council’s planning committee, reports BBC. The new £500 million stadium, which is estimated to be completed by 2020, will replace the existing stadium at Stamford Bridge, increasing the capacity of the space by almost 20,000 spectators to 60,000 seats.

The design of the new stadium is inspired by Gothic architecture, as well as nearby Victorian-era brick terraces, which will wrap around the entirety of the building.

Committee decision to approve the stadium plans does not mean that work can begin on site; various other permissions will be necessary before the final decision will be made by London Mayor Sadiq Khan.

© Herzog & de Meuron © Herzog & de Meuron © Herzog & de Meuron © Herzog & de Meuron +9

Tate Harmer's "Big Tent" Wins Competition for new Museum of Scouting in London

12:00 - 5 January, 2017
Tate Harmer's "Big Tent" Wins Competition for new Museum of Scouting in London, © Tate Harmer
© Tate Harmer

London-based firm Tate Harmer has won a competition to design a new £6 million ($7.4 million USD) museum for The Scout Association (TSA) at the group’s headquarters in Chingford, east London. Their proposal takes the form of a big, colorful tent that will tell the story of the Scouting movement within a fun, environmentally conscious structure.

© Tate Harmer © Tate Harmer © Tate Harmer © Tate Harmer +10

British Architects Ridicule Government Plans for 14 New "Garden Villages"

13:30 - 2 January, 2017
British Architects Ridicule Government Plans for 14 New "Garden Villages", Houses in Hardwick "Garden City," a suburb of Chepstow in Wales, that was built in the early 20th century. Image © <a href='http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/1038431'>Geograph user Ruth Sharville</a> licensed under <a href='http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a>
Houses in Hardwick "Garden City," a suburb of Chepstow in Wales, that was built in the early 20th century. Image © Geograph user Ruth Sharville licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

Yesterday, the UK Government announced plans for 3 new garden towns and 14 new "garden villages" across England, expanding a plan that already includes 7 previously announced garden towns. Explaining the concept of the garden villages, the Department for Communities and Local Government described settlements of 1,500 to 10,000 homes, saying that together the 14 locations have the potential to deliver 48,000 new houses. In order to expedite the creation of these new settlements, the government has set aside a fund of £6 million (US$7.4 million), which housebuilders will be permitted to use in order to accelerate development at the sites.

However, the architectural community in the UK has mocked the proposals and the government's use of language, highlighting what appears to be a poor understanding of Ebenezer Howard's Garden Cities concept. Many have also pointed out that the plans are relatively meager in a country that, by many estimates, is falling hundreds of thousands of new homes short of the number needed every year.

David Adjaye to be Knighted by Queen Elizabeth II

04:00 - 2 January, 2017
David Adjaye to be Knighted by Queen Elizabeth II, Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture. Image © Darren Bradley
Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture. Image © Darren Bradley

David Adjaye OBE, principal of Adjaye Associates, will be Knighted by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II for his services to architecture at an investiture in 2017. The Central Chancery of the Orders of Knighthood at St. James's Palace, who administer the Knight Batchelor awards that will be bestowed upon the architect, described Adjaye as "one of the leading architects of his generation and a global cultural ambassador for the UK."

Campaigners Battle to Save Ove Arup's Brutalist Dunelm House in Durham

12:00 - 30 December, 2016
Campaigners Battle to Save Ove Arup's Brutalist Dunelm House in Durham, Dunelm House with Kingsgate Bridge in the foreground. Image © <a href='http://www.geograph.org.uk/more.php?id=2935919'>Geograph user Des Blenkinsopp</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a>
Dunelm House with Kingsgate Bridge in the foreground. Image © Geograph user Des Blenkinsopp licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

Campaigners in the UK have launched a petition to save Durham University's Student Union Building, also known as Dunelm House, after the university announced its intention to demolish and replace the brutalist structure earlier this month. Designed in 1966 by Ove Arup and the Architects' Co-Partnership, the building is perhaps the most important 20th-century edifice in a city that is better-known for its UNESCO World Heritage-listed cathedral and castle.

Wolfgang Buttress’ UK Expo Pavilion, "The Hive," Wins 2016 Landscape Institute Award

16:00 - 26 December, 2016
Wolfgang Buttress’ UK Expo Pavilion, "The Hive," Wins 2016 Landscape Institute Award, © Nick Caville BDP. Courtesy of the Landscape Institute
© Nick Caville BDP. Courtesy of the Landscape Institute

BDP and Wolfgang Buttress’ pavilion, The Hive, has been awarded the 2016 Landscape Institute Award for Best Design for a Temporary Landscape as part of their 2016 awards program.

Judges for the award noted the project’s ability to interact with its site, remarking that they were ‘impressed by the quality and simplicity of the design and execution, in particular the way in which the design works with a sensitive landscape to provide a beautiful and functional temporary setting for the installation, and a longer-term facility for events and education.”