Watch Herzog & de Meuron’s 56 Leonard Take Shape in New York

Herzog & de Meuron‘s 56 Leonard is taking shape in New York. Due to top out this summer, the 60-story condominium has become known as the “Jenga tower” for its cantilevered glass facade. Upon its completion in 2016, the 821 foot-tall (250 meter) Tribeca building will be comprised of 145 residences and will feature a  sculpture at its base. Check out the Rob Cleary time-lapse above to view the building’s progress over the last year.

ArchDaily Editors Select 20 (More) Amazing 21st Century Museums

In honor of International Museum Day we’ve collected twenty compelling museum projects. In this round up you’ll find a truly global selection; from Wang Shu’s Ningbo Historic Museum in China and Tod Williams + Billie Tsien’s Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia to ’s Contemporary Art Museum in Buenos Aires, see all of our editors’ favorites after the break!

Spotlight: Herzog & de Meuron

Courtesy of Herzog & de Meuron

Led by (born 19 April 1950) and Pierre de Meuron (born 8 May 1950), most descriptions of Herzog & de Meuron projects are almost paradoxical: in one paragraph they will be praised for their dedication to tradition and vernacular forms, in the next for their thoroughly modern innovation. However, in the hands of Herzog & de Meuron this is no paradox, as the internationally-renowned architectural duo combine tradition and innovation in such a way that the two elements actually enhance each other.

A Guided Tour Of The 2015 Milan Expo

© Hufton+Crow

With 145 countries participating in the 2015 Expo, alongside input from international organizations, corporate partners and an extensive program organized by the Expo itself, there’s a lot going on in Milan right now. So much so, in fact, that it can be a little overwhelming to get a handle on all the sights that are worth your attention.

To help you out, we’ve put together a guided tour of the key pavilions that are turning heads, including the defining vistas of the expo grounds, the displays that are worth your time and the oddities that might entertain. From the Expo’s defining icon, the 30-meter-tall Tree of Life, to the exhibition on architecture’s favorite consumable (that’s coffee), and all the national pavilions in between, the things you need to see are here. Whether you’re planning to visit the Expo and want a quick and dirty way to ensure you’ve covered the highlights, or whether you’re simply hoping to live vicariously through the internet, this tour is for you.

Take A Look At Milan Expo’s 2015 Pavilions on Opening Day

The USA Pavilion’s 7,200-square-foot vertical farm. Image © Saverio Lombardi Vallauri

Italy’s global commercial fair, Milan Expo 2015 opened today. The six month event, expected to attract nearly 20 million visitors, is showcasing 54 national pavilions, among a number of corporate and multinational installations, all focused on “Feeding the Planet” and promoting their national cuisine. Pavilions by Foster + Partners, Herzog & de Meuron, SPEECHDaniel Libeskind and many others will remain on view through October 31.

Take a look at some of the fair’s most talked about pavilions on opening day, after the break.

Watch Now: Jacques Herzog Lecture Livestream

Courtesy of Herzog & de Meuron

Jacques Herzog’s first lecture in Denmark will be livestreamed on April 28, from 11:30 – 1:30 EST, during which the Swiss architect will discuss the New North Zealand Hospital project. Herzog & de Meuron, along with Danish firm Vilhelm Lauritzen Architects, was selected to design the 124,000-square-meter facility during an international design competition last year. To be built near Hillerød, the hospital will be Herzog & de Meuron’s first project in Scandinavia. Learn more about the project and view the livestream of the lecture after the break.

Miu Miu Aoyama Store / Herzog & de Meuron

© Nacasa & Partners

Architects: Herzog & de Meuron
Location: ,
Area: 269.0 sqm
Year: 2015
Photographs: Nacasa & Partners

Jacques Herzog, Masterplanner of the Milan 2015 Expo, Thinks it will be a “Vanity Fair”

The for the Expo produced by Herzog & de Meuron in 2009. Image © Herzog & de Meuron

It seems Jacques Herzog is not particularly excited about the opening of the 2015 Expo in Milan later this year. In an interview with uncube magazine Herzog – one half of Herzog & de Meuron, the Expo’s masterplanners – explains why they left the project in 2011, along with collaborators Stefano Boeri, William McDonough and Ricky Burdett. In their absence, he says, the Expo will now feature their plan “only as an urbanistic and formal pattern, not as an intellectual concept,” and their plan to transform the event into ”a radically new vision for a world exhibition” has been twisted so that the Expo “will be the same kind of vanity fair that we’ve seen in the past.” Read the full interview here.

Milan Expo 2015: Herzog & de Meuron Designs Slow Food Pavilion for Carlo Petrini

Courtesy of Herzog & de Meuron

Herzog & de Meuron have unveiled the design for their Slow Food Pavilion, due for completion by the 2015 Milan Expo in May. Showcasing the work of Carlo Petrini’s Slow Food organization, the pavilion promotes the global organization’s vision of universal access to “good, clean and fair food.”

Sited on a triangular piece of land in the Eastern end of the Expo’s central boulevard, the pavilion uses a a triangular configuration of tables to evoke what Herzog & de Meuron describe as “an atmosphere of refectory and market.”

The 14 Stories Behind the 2015 Building of the Year Award Winners

With our annual Building of the Year Awards, over 30,000 readers narrowed down over 3,000 projects, selecting just 14 as the best examples of architecture that has published in the past year. The results have been celebrated and widely shared, of course, usually in the form of images of each project. But what is often forgotten in this flurry of image sharing is that every one of these 14 projects has a backstory of significance which adds to our understanding of their architectural quality.

Some of these projects are intelligent responses to pressing social issues, others are twists on a well-established typology. Others still are simply supreme examples of architectural dexterity. In order that we don’t forget the tremendous amount of effort that goes into creating each of these architectural masterpieces, continue reading after the break for the 14 stories that defined this year’s of the Year Awards.

Winners of the 2015 Building of the Year Awards

After two weeks of nominations and voting, we are pleased to present the winners of the 2015 ArchDaily Building of the Year Awards. As a peer-based, crowdsourced architecture award, the results shown here represent the collective intelligence of 31,000 architects, filtering the best architecture from over 3,000 projects featured on ArchDaily during the past year.

The winning buildings represent a diverse group of architects, from Pritzker Prize winners such as Álvaro Siza, Herzog & de Meuron and Shigeru Ban, to up-and-coming practices such as EFFEKT and Building which have so far been less widely covered by the media. In many cases their designs may be the most visually striking, but each also approaches its context and program in a unique way to solve social, environmental or economic challenges in communities around the world. By publishing them on ArchDaily, these buildings have helped us to impart inspiration and knowledge to architects around the world, furthering our mission. So to everyone who participated by either nominating or voting for a shortlisted project, thank you for being a part of this amazing process, where the voices of architects from all over the world unite to form one strong, intelligent, forward-thinking message.

Foster + Partners Remain World’s “Most Admired Architect”

Foster + Partners and FR-EE – Fernando Romero EnterprisE’s winning scheme for the Mexico City Airport expansion (click to learn more). Image Courtesy of DBOX for Foster + Partners

A global survey conducted by BD has deemed Foster + Partners to be world’s “most admired architect” for the ninth consecutive year. The -based practice, led by Norman Foster, is the 16th largest practice in the world. Foster + Partners’ ranking was undeniable, as the survey revealed a significant seven percent lead over runner-up contender, Herzog & de Meuron.

“To be voted most admired practice by our peers is a great honor,” said Norman Foster. “It is a huge tribute to our talented and hard-working teams with their myriad skills and disciplines, both in our many studios around the world and our base in London, all working towards the common goal of bringing innovative design solutions to create a better built environment.”

See who else topped the list as the world’s “most admired,” after the break.

Herzog & de Meuron Considered for London’s Chelsea FC Stadium Expansion

Herzog & de Meuron’s “Bird Nest” in Beijing. Image © Flickr CC License / DPerstin

Herzog & de Meuron is said to be collaborating with Lifschutz Davidson Sandilands to explore options for expanding the Chelsea Club’s Stamford Bridge home stadium in west London. According to a report by the Architects’ Journal, news of the possible expansion first broke last June, after considerations of relocating the stadium were heavily criticized by the public.

The stadium, originally designed by Scottish architect Archibald Leitch and built in 1876, has already undergone several renovations. Chelsea FC hopes to increase its capacity from 41,837 to 60,000, as well as provide a new decking over the railway line on the east and north sides of the building.

More from Chelsea FC regarding the expansion, after the break.

Paris’ City Council Rejects Herzog & de Meuron’s 180-Meter “Triangle Tower”

© Herzog & de Meuron

Widening the debate on whether or not should preserve its 19-century skyline or “embrace innovation,” Parisian city council members have rejected the controversial, 180-meter “Triangle Tower” designed by Herzog & de Meuron. Despite the 83-78 vote, the fight carries on; Mayor Anne Hidalgo has declared the veto to be invalid and hopes a new round of balloting will rule in favor of the tower. Though, in a city that fears of loosing its “existing urban fabric to skyscrapers,” it seems unlikely that the tower will be built. 

Images Released of New Herzog & de Meuron-Designed National Library of Israel

© Herzog & de Meuron

The Israeli National Library has released images of Herzog & de Meuron’s design for the library’s new home in . The six-story building, awarded to the Swiss practice over five others following an extensive interview process conducted last year, will be built by 2019 on a prominent site at the base of the Knesset building and adjacent to the Museum, Science Museum and Hebrew University.

More image and information about the new library, after the break.

Herzog & de Meuron Designs 205-Meter Tower and Research Center for Swiss Pharmaceutical Company

© Herzog & de Meuron

Herzog & de Meuron has unveiled plans for the modernization of the Roche pharmaceutical company’s headquarters. With the first tower already under construction, the overall vision is to consolidate and update all existing facilities, including a historic Otto R. Salvisberg-designed office , as well as construct a new, four-tower research center and 205-meter tall office tower by 2022.

“The planned consolidation of the existing industrial site will eliminate the need to build over green zones”, emphasizes Jürg Erismann, Head of the Basel/Kaiseraugst Site. “Instead, Roche will be making more efficient use of those parts of the site that have already been developed but cannot be expanded.”

Siza’s Iberê Camargo Foundation and Herzog & de Meuron’s 1111 Lincoln Road Win Inaugural MCHAP Award

The winners of the inaugural MCHAP Award, recognizing outstanding projects in the Americas: Álvaro Siza’s Iberê Camargo Foundation in Porto Alegre, Brazil and Herzog & de Meuron’s 1111 Lincoln Road. Photographs © Fernando Guerra | FG + SG – últimas reportagens and © Hufton + Crow

Álvaro Siza’s Iberê Camargo Foundation in Porto Alegre, Brazil and Herzog & de Meuron’s 1111 Lincoln Road in Miami, Florida have just been announced as the winners of the inaugural Mies Crown Hall Americas Prize (MCHAP).

MCHAP was established by the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) in Chicago to recognize the best built works in the Americas. As Kenneth Frampton noted when the finalists were announced in Santiago, Chile, the MCHAP are the first time that an architectural prize has been approached, not in a trans-atlantic, horizontal manner, but rather vertically across the Americas.

Although initially the jury intended to select one work to be honored for the 2000-2013 period, they felt that both projects represented “an uncommon expressive display of structure,” and divided the 13-year period into two parts. Siza’s Iberê Camargo Foundation was selected as the 2000-2008 winner, while Herzog & de Meuron’s mixed-use parking garage was selected for the 2009-2013 period. The two winning projects were selected from a total of seven finalists by jury members Jorge Francisco Liernur, Sarah Whiting, Wiel Arets, Dominique Perrault, and Kenneth Frampton.

Learn more about the winning projects after the break.

Herzog & de Meuron Designs 28-Story Luxury Tower for Manhattan

Courtesy of Ian Schrager Company

Herzog & de Meuron has teamed up with British designer John Pawson to design a 28-story tower for ’s Bowery district. The raw concrete tower, as developer Ian Schrager describes, will be designed as the “ultimate expression of Uptown meets Downtown.” Eleven luxury residences will top a 370-room hotel, all featuring open plans and mullionless floor-to-ceiling windows that frame unobstructed views of the city.