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Paul Andreu: "I Would Only Take On a Project if the Ideas Were Mine. Otherwise, I Am Not Interested."

09:30 - 7 March, 2017
Charles-de-Gaulle airport, Terminal 1, Paris, 1967-1974. Image © Paul Maurer
Charles-de-Gaulle airport, Terminal 1, Paris, 1967-1974. Image © Paul Maurer

For 40 years, Paul Andreu was among the world's foremost airport design experts. Reflecting on this before the turn of the millennium, he stated that architectural historians of the future might consider the 1990s as “the age of the air terminal.” But shortly after this, he left the arena of airport design to focus on other large projects, many of them in China. In this interview, the latest of Vladimir Belogolovsky's “City of Ideas” series, Andreu explains why he made the switch and shares his thoughts on how good architecture is made—saying it often depends more on what you don't tell your client than what you do.

Paul Andreu: Before we start, I must explain something. I am an architect and engineer. For a long time I was not an independent architect but worked at and then was the head of airport works at Aéroports de Paris Ingénierie or ADPi, a subsidiary of Aéroports de Paris (ADP). This public establishment is not only in charge of the planning, design, and operation of three Paris-region airports, but is also involved in airport works all around the world, as well as other large-scale architectural projects. First, we did airports in France, then in the Middle East and Africa, then in China and all over Asia, and then we developed projects in other parts of the world. Most of the time we developed our projects from concept all the way through construction; although once we did just the concept for Kansai airport on a specially built island in the Bay of Osaka. As you know, it was designed by Renzo Piano and I consulted for him on function and circulation aspects.

Charles-de-Gaulle airport, Terminal II, modules A & B, Paris, 1972-1982. Image © Labo ADP Charles-de-Gaulle airport, Terminal II, modules A & B, Paris, 1972-1982. Image © Labo ADP New airport of Jakarta, Sukarno-Hatta, Indonesia, 1977-1985. Image © Labo ADP National Centre for the Performing Arts (Opéra de Pékin), Beijing, China, 1999-2007. Image © Paul Maurer +69

Considering the Airport Terminal of Tomorrow

04:00 - 19 January, 2017
Considering the Airport Terminal of Tomorrow, Courtesy of Aerial Futures
Courtesy of Aerial Futures

Aerial Futures, Grounded Visions: Shaping the Airport Terminal of Tomorrow was a two-day symposium held in October 2016 as part of the European Cultural Center's collateral event at the 2016 Venice Biennale. It encouraged discussion about the future of air travel from the perspectives of architecture, design, technology, culture and user experience. The event featured presentations and discussions by the likes of airport architect Curtis FentressNelly Ben YahounDonald Albrecht, Director of the Museum of the City of New York; Anna Gasco, post-doctoral researcher at the ETH-Future Cities Laboratory in Singapore; Jonathan Ledgard, co-founder of the Droneport Project; and Ashok Raiji, Principal at Arup New York.

Courtesy of Aerial Futures Courtesy of Aerial Futures Courtesy of Aerial Futures Courtesy of Aerial Futures +4

New York Plans $10 Billion Renovation of JFK Airport

14:20 - 6 January, 2017
New York Plans $10 Billion Renovation of JFK Airport, Courtesy of State of New York
Courtesy of State of New York

New York City’s busiest airport is about to receive a major overhaul.

Proposed by New York governor Andrew Cuomo, the plan calls for a $10 billion renovation to New York City’s busiest airport, transforming the facility into a “a unified, interconnected, world-class’ complex.”

Courtesy of State of New York Courtesy of State of New York Courtesy of State of New York Courtesy of State of New York +5

Aedas Wins Two International Competitions to Design Airports in Shenzhen and Hong Kong

16:00 - 23 November, 2016
Aedas Wins Two International Competitions to Design Airports in Shenzhen and Hong Kong, Shenzhen Airport Satellite Concourse, China, by Aedas. Image Courtesy of Aedas
Shenzhen Airport Satellite Concourse, China, by Aedas. Image Courtesy of Aedas

Aedas have recently won two international competitions to design international airport buildings: the Shenzhen Airport Satellite Concourse and Hong Kong International Airport Third Runway Passenger Building.

In recent years, Aedas have emerged as a leader in airport design, as they are also currently working on the Hong Kong International Airport Terminal 2 Expansion, and have previously worked on Hong Kong International Airport Midfield Concourse and North Satellite Concourse. With the two newly-won projects, Aedas hopes to reinforce their strength and growing influence in airport design.

Aerial Futures: Grounded Visions for the Airport Terminal of Tomorrow

09:30 - 11 October, 2016
Aerial Futures: Grounded Visions for the Airport Terminal of Tomorrow, Courtesy of Unknown
Courtesy of Unknown

The Aerial Futures symposium explores the current state of airport design and the future of this rapidly evolving architectural typology. The symposium brings thinkers and practitioners to Venice for two days, and is open to the general public.

Bird-Shaped Ashgabat Airport Spreads its Wings in Turkmenistan

16:10 - 23 September, 2016

Designing airports based on flight-inspired, aerodynamic forms is nothing new – in fact, that has been the concept behind some of history’s most beautiful airport terminals, such as Eero Saarinen’s iconic TWA Terminal in New York. But until now, no airport building has been quite so literal with its symbolism as the recently unveiled Ashgabat International Airport.

The new terminal building in Turkmenistan's capital takes the form of a soaring falcon, echoing the mascot of the national airline carrier. And at a cost of $2.3 billion USD, the structure has already drummed up some controversy – critics claim the building is much larger than needed to handle the country’s relative low traffic rates.

See some images of the bird-shaped building below.

Shenyang Taoxian International Airport Terminal 3 / CNADRI

19:00 - 11 August, 2016
Shenyang Taoxian International Airport Terminal 3 / CNADRI, Courtesy of CNADRI
Courtesy of CNADRI

Courtesy of CNADRI Courtesy of CNADRI Courtesy of CNADRI Courtesy of CNADRI +14

AD Classics: TWA Flight Center / Eero Saarinen

03:00 - 13 June, 2016
AD Classics: TWA Flight Center / Eero Saarinen, © Cameron Blaylock
© Cameron Blaylock

Built in the early days of airline travel, the TWA Terminal is a concrete symbol of the rapid technological transformations which were fueled by the outset of the Second World War. Eero Saarinen sought to capture the sensation of flight in all aspects of the building, from a fluid and open interior, to the wing-like concrete shell of the roof. At TWA’s behest, Saarinen designed more than a functional terminal; he designed a monument to the airline and to aviation itself.

This AD Classic features a series of exclusive images by Cameron Blaylock, photographed in May 2016. Blaylock used a Contax camera and Zeiss lenses with Rollei black and white film to reflect camera technology of the 1960s.

© Cameron Blaylock © Cameron Blaylock © Cameron Blaylock © Cameron Blaylock +26

The New York Times Laments Poor Airport Design for Passengers

12:00 - 16 April, 2016
The New York Times Laments Poor Airport Design for Passengers, Interior of Beijing Airport by Foster + Partners
Interior of Beijing Airport by Foster + Partners

new article by Chris Holbrook for The New York Times, "Airports, Designed for Everyone but the Passenger," points out a black sheep among architectural typology: the airport. Though built for one of the most delicate and stressful human situations, airports are notoriously hostile to the travelers that occupy them.

Geographies of Uncertainty: Space and Territory in the Operational Logic of UPS

04:00 - 13 April, 2016
Geographies of Uncertainty: Space and Territory in the Operational Logic of UPS, Space and Territory in the Operational Logic of UPS. Image © Ghazal Jafari
Space and Territory in the Operational Logic of UPS. Image © Ghazal Jafari

The following article was first published by Volume Magazine in their 47th issue, The System*. You can read the Editorial of this issue, How Much Does Your System Weigh?here.

For the United Parcel Service (UPS), space is valued insofar as it grounds the socio-technical assemblages that secure the company’s economy of speed. Holding one of the largest airline fleets in the United States, UPS’s services range from delivering cargo for the US Air Force and e-commerce packages to relocating endangered animal species and partaking in disaster relief. It operationalizes logistics in the space between military and civilian domains and from the scale of cargo for large corporations to small packages for individuals. UPS runs a global logistics network that crosses more than 200 countries and territories and delivers about 17 million packages every day through its planetary ring of Shanghai-Shenzhen-Anchorage-Louisville-Cologne-Dubai.[1] It participates in the making of trans-border infrastructural systems and influences national politics towards the lifting of legal barriers to transnational trade. Yet what makes UPS significant is not its volume of shipment, infrastructural capacity, or magnitude of operational precision, but rather its resiliency and acute performance within the tides of uncertainty.

UNStudio Proposes User-Centric Design for the Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport

08:00 - 4 November, 2015
UNStudio Proposes User-Centric Design for the Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport, Aerial Rendered View. Image Courtesy of UNStudio
Aerial Rendered View. Image Courtesy of UNStudio

Following the selection of Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partnersproposal for the Taiwan Taouyuan International Airport as the winning design, UNStudio has released their own proposal, which received 2nd place. Called the “most innovative design concept” and the design that the jury “wanted to experience the most” by Michael Sparks (jury member and Dean and Professor at Syracuse University), the proposal, with a design team headed by Ben Van Berkel, re-imagines the scale of the airport typology. Read more about their shortlisted entry after the break.

Interior Rendered View. Image Courtesy of UNStudio Exterior Rendered View. Image Courtesy of UNStudio Interior Rendered View. Image Courtesy of UNStudio Interior Rendered View. Image Courtesy of UNStudio +13

The New LaGuardia Airport is "Lackluster and Uninspired"

09:30 - 11 August, 2015
The New LaGuardia Airport is "Lackluster and Uninspired", © Governor Andrew Cuomo
© Governor Andrew Cuomo

Two weeks ago, New York Governer Andrew Cuomo and Vice President Joe Biden unveiled a plan to transform LaGuardia airport into "a globally-renowned, 21st century airport that is worthy of the city and state of New York." However the redesign is not universally popular. In this article originally titled "The New LaGuardia Airport: Not Functional, Not Inspiring, Not an Icon," - the first of his regular column over at 6sqft - architecture critic Carter B. Horsley explains why "Queens deserves better."

The recent announcement by Governor Cuomo and Vice President Joe Biden of plans to “rebuild” La Guardia Airport at a cost of $4 billion was described in a Page One caption in The Post as “the end of an error,” a reference to the airport’s reputation that became tarnished over the years. Last October, Biden remarked that if someone had taken him to LaGuardia, he’d think he was in “some Third World country.”

Since its opening in 1939, when it accommodated “flying boats” at its Marine Air Terminal, the airport has not kept up with the growth of jumbo jets and air travel in general, but in the days of the Super Constellation passenger planes with their triple-tails and sloping noses, it was a very nice Art Deco place.

The published renderings that accompanied the announcement were not terribly reassuring, as they depicted a very long curved terminal with gangly tentacles raised over plane taxiways that hinted at torsos of praying mantises: an awkward rather than a graceful vault.

© Governor Andrew Cuomo © Governor Andrew Cuomo © Governor Andrew Cuomo © Governor Andrew Cuomo +15

New York's LaGuardia Airport to Get 21st Century Makeover

14:34 - 28 July, 2015
New York's LaGuardia Airport to Get 21st Century Makeover , © Governor Andrew Cuomo
© Governor Andrew Cuomo

Governor Andrew Cuomo has unveiled a $4 billion plan to redevelop New York's outdated LaGuardia Airport. Originally built in 1939, LaGuardia has been running inefficiently and overcapacity for decades.

The redesign, envisioned by HOK and Parsons Brinckerhoff, will unify the airport's fragmented terminals with a single roof, while providing expanded transportation access, elite passenger amenities and increased taxiway space. Terminal B will be replaced with a larger structure that will (eventually) connect to the renovated Terminals C and D. 

New Orlando International Airport Terminal Building – Call for Statements of Qualifications

10:00 - 21 May, 2015
New Orlando International Airport Terminal Building – Call for Statements of Qualifications

The Orlando International Airport ("OIA"), operated by the Greater Orlando Aviation Authority, seeks innovative, visionary architects and engineers for its planned, new airport terminal compound. OIA is a world-class airport that welcomes over 36 million business and leisure passengers per year.  In order to better accommodate its increasing number of passengers, especially in the international sector, OIA has under construction an Intermodal Terminal Facility for multiple modes of ground transportation, an Automated People Mover System connecting the main terminal, a 2,500 unit parking deck, and all associated horizontal infrastructure to support this program and the future expansion for a new terminal building. 

Zaha Hadid and ADPI Unveil Plans for World’s Largest Passenger Terminal in Beijing

00:00 - 5 February, 2015
Zaha Hadid and ADPI Unveil Plans for World’s Largest Passenger Terminal in Beijing , © ZHA / Methanoia
© ZHA / Methanoia

ADP Ingeniérie (ADPI) and Zaha Hadid Architects (ZHA) have unveiled designs for what will be the world’s largest airport passenger terminal - the Beijing New Airport Terminal Building. The Daxing scheme, based off the bid-winning planning concept by ADPI, hopes to alleviate traffic from Beijing’s existing Capital Airport, which is operating beyond its planned capacity.

“Initially accommodating 45 million passengers per year, the new terminal will be adaptable and sustainable, operating in many different configurations dependent on varying aircraft and passenger traffic throughout each day,” stated ZHA in a press release. “With an integrated multi-modal transport centre featuring direct links to local and national rail services including the Gaotie high speed rail, the new Daxing airport will be a key hub within Beijing’s growing transport network and a catalyst for the region’s economic development, including the city of Tianjin and Hebei Province.”

Safdie Architects Design Glass "Air Hub" for Singapore Changi Airport

00:00 - 5 December, 2014
Safdie Architects Design Glass "Air Hub" for Singapore Changi Airport, © Safdie Architects
© Safdie Architects

Today, Safdie Architects revealed plans for a glass, spherical “air hub” that will be built at the center of the Singapore’s Changi Airport, the world’s sixth busiest airport. The “jeweled” biodome was presented as a “new paradigm” for international airports that will boost Singapore’s stopover appeal and become a “lifestyle destination” for both travelers and local residents.

Learn more about the design and a word from Moshe Safdie, after the break. 

Rogers Stirk Harbour’s Geneva Airport Design Receives Planning Permission

00:00 - 27 November, 2014
Rogers Stirk Harbour’s Geneva Airport Design Receives Planning Permission , External view of Geneva Airport East Wing at dusk. Image Courtesy of RBI-T consortium
External view of Geneva Airport East Wing at dusk. Image Courtesy of RBI-T consortium

Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners’ (RSHP) design for the Geneva airport’s East Wing has received planning permission from the Federal Authorities in Switzerland. The 520 meter-long facility will connect to the airport’s existing terminal and includes additional Departures and Arrivals halls, contact stands and gate lounge seating as well as first class airlines lounges and technical basements, according to a press release.

Grimshaw Selected to Expand Peru's International Airport

00:00 - 21 October, 2014
Grimshaw Selected to Expand Peru's International Airport, Aeropuerto Internacional Jorge Chávez. Image Courtesy of LAP
Aeropuerto Internacional Jorge Chávez. Image Courtesy of LAP

Grimshaw has landed a $950 million expansion project for the Jorge Chávez International Airport in Lima, Peru. As reported by the Architect’s Journal, Grimshaw will work with ARCADIS, CH2MHill and Ramboll to design a seven million square meter scheme that will include a new air traffic control tower and second terminal for the international airport. Designs are set to be revealed in 2015.