A Provocative Possible Future for Moscow’s Failing Business District

What can you do with a business district that has an office vacancy rate of 40%, is completely separated from its surroundings and is facing increasing competition from business centers emerging throughout the city? These are questions that are increasingly being asked about Moscow‘s International Business District, the symbol of capitalism that was planned in 1992 after the fall of the Soviet Union, yet is still under construction today.

Eduardo Cassina and Liva Dudareva, founders of METASITU and researchers at the Strelka Institute, have proposed a provocative idea in response to this dilemma: envisaging the business district’s future in 2041, they imagine a scenario where the district is linked by underground metro to Sheremetyevo And Domodedovo airports in the North and South – forming the world’s first mega-, and the first one where it is possible to live in the terminal building without ever leaving.

Read on after the break for more explanation of idea

Norman Foster Reasserts Belief in Thames Estuary Airport

Courtesy of

In response to the UK Airports Commission’s call for evidence, Foster + Partners has released a detailed feasibility study supporting their plans for a new airport on the Isle of Grain in the Thames Estuary. Their plan proposes a four-runway airport built on a 35 square kilometre platform constructed partially in the mouth of the Thames. The scheme is popularly called “Boris Island” thanks to its most prominent supporter, Mayor of London Boris Johnson.

Norman Foster said “Since the Airports Commission submission a year ago, the need for increased airport capacity has become even more urgent. It is time to get serious about the issue of airport capacity. Britain needs an effective long-term solution, not the usual short-term fix that is Heathrow’s proposed third runway. London today needs to follow in the footsteps of its nineteenth-century forebears and invest boldly in . Only long-term thinking will properly serve the demands of our future generations.”

Read on for a breakdown of the information contained in the report

Boris Johnson Enlists 3 Practices to Envisage the Future of Heathrow

Richard Rogers’ Terminal 5 at Heathrow. Image © Flickr CC User NewbieRunner

London Mayor Boris Johnson has enlisted the help of three architects, Hawkins\Brown, Rick Mather Architects and Maccreanor Lavington Architects to design a new town on the site of Heathrow Airport. The move is designed to encourage support for Johnson’s plan to build a new airport in the Thames Estuary, jokingly dubbed ‘Boris Island’ by some. If the Estuary Airport were to go ahead it could mean closing Heathrow, currently one of the world’s busiest airports, freeing the land up for the new development. You can read more on the story at the Architects’ Journal.

Montreal’s Mirabel Airport Terminal to be Demolished

© Wikimedia CC user Yvan Ieduc

The owners of the Montréal-Mirabel International Airport have confirmed that, after a decade lying vacant, it will finally demolish the airport’s sleek black terminal building. When it was completed in 1975, Mirabel was the world’s largest airport, but it quickly became unpopular with airlines as it was simply too far from Montréal, and was re-purposed as a testing site and cargo airport. Now, with the terminal building requiring $15 million in emergency repairs, owner Aéroports de Montréal have announced that it is “irreparably obsolete” and are seeking tenders for its demolition. You can read the full story at CBC News.

Mexico City Shortlists Seven Architects for Major Airport Expansion

Zagreb Competition Proposal / ZHA ©

Zaha Hadid, Norman Foster and Richard Rogers are among seven international practices listed to compete for a 5,000 hectare expansion that hopes to “alleviate severe congestion” at the Mexico City airport. With each team led by Mexican firms, the shortlisted architects, which also include SOM, Gensler, Pascall+Watson and Teodoro González de León with Taller de Arquitectura X, have been asked to envision a 70-gate, phased expansion capable of hosting 40-million passengers per year. A schematic masterplan has been provided by Arup. Completion of the first phases is tentatively planned for 2018. 

Grimshaw to Design World’s Largest Terminal in Istanbul

Istanbul. Image Courtesy of Grimshaw

Following a competitive interview process Grimshaw, in partnership with Nordic Office of Architecture, has been appointed by the Turkish consortium of Cengiz, Mapa, Limak, Kolin and Kalyon to design the terminal complex for Istanbul New Airport

Located on the Black Sea coast, some 35km outside of Istanbul, the ambitious six-runway development, masterplanned by Arup, will be delivered in four phases. The first phase will open in 2019 and aims to serve 90 million passengers per year. This will increase to 150 million passengers per annum once fully complete. The new will include the world’s largest terminal, with a gross floor area close to one million square meters.

Twelve Architects to Design Airport in Russia for 2018 World Cup

Courtesy of Twelve Architects & Masterplanners

-based Twelve Architects & Masterplanners have won a competition to deliver a radical new for Rostov, Russia, just in time for the 2018 World Cup.

Pan-Am Terminal at JFK: Save or Scrap?

 

© Jon Proctor

Paul Goldberger weighs in on the shaky future of the architectural gems at JFK (which includes Eero Saarinen’s TWA Terminal), saying, “Like the Worldport, TWA is unworkable as a modern terminal. Both buildings are tiny by today’s standards, and there’s no place for security equipment except in the middle of the space, where it obliterates any sense of the architecture. But their small size also means that they don’t take up all that much real estate, and they ought to be usable as something other than as places where people get on and off airplanes—as restaurants and shops, say, or as a museum.” What do you think? Save or scrap?

LAX Completes First Phase of its $1.5 Billion Terminal

Courtesy of

Phase 1 of the new Tom Bradley International Terminal at LAX, the largest public works project in the history of , has been completed. The new airport, designed by Fentress Architects to be a LEED-certified landmark for the city, will feature a flowing, ocean-inspired roofline, a three-story,150,000-square-foot Great Hall, and one of the most advanced multimedia Integrated Environmental Media Systems (IEMS) in the world. The $1.5 billion project has been funded solely from LAX’s operating revenues, without public funds.

Seen From Above: Jeffrey Milstein Captures the Art of Airport Design

Newark Liberty International © Jeffrey Milstein

Inspired by a childhood spent filming planes at LAX with an 8-millimeter videocamera, New York photographer and former Berkeley architecture student Jeffrey Milstein has turned his fascination for aviation into a career. Typically known for photographing the underbellies of aircrafts, Milstein’s latest series captures the artistic composition and elaborate array of patterns formed by airports and only seen from above. He describes this series as revealing “the patterns, layering and complexity of cities, and the circulation patterns for travel, such as waterways, roads, and airports that grow organically over time much like a living organism.”

More of Milstein’s after the break…

Aerotropolis: The Key to a Prosperous, 21st Century City?

via Evolve Media & Dr.

“The rapid expansion of airport-linked commercial facilities is making today’s air gateways anchors of 21st century metropolitan development where distant travelers and locals alike can conduct business, exchange knowledge, shop, eat, sleep, and be entertained without going more than 15 minutes from the airport. This functional and spatial evolution is transforming many city airports into airport .” - Dr. John Kasarda

Major international airports have developed over time into key nodes in global production and enterprise systems through speed, agility and connectivity. These transportation hubs are able to dramatically stimulate local economies by attracting a wide range of aviation-related businesses to their peripheries and resulting in what John Kasarda, a US academic who studies and advises governments on city planning issues, has dubbed the “Aerotropolis.” The Aerotropolis, like any other traditional city, consists of a central core with rings of development permeating outwards; unlike a traditional city, however, the city’s core is an airport and all neighboring development supports and is supported in turn by the airport industry. Several airports around the globe have organically evolved into these airport-dependent communities, generating huge economic profits and creating thousands of jobs, but what Kasarda is arguing for is a more organized and purposeful approach to the development of these Aerotropolises – what he believes to be the future model of a successful city.

Read on for more on the Aerotropolis vision.

Zaha Hadid to Develop Plans for New London Airport

Zagreb Competition Proposal / ZHA ©

As pressure mounts to solve the UK’s aviation crisis, the Mayor of London has appointed Zaha Hadid Architects (ZHA) alongside a world-class team of aviation experts to develop plans for a new major airport in southeast England. The team is expected to resolve the debate on how and where the capital’s next multi-runway airport hub should be constructed, a decision that will play a critical role in the future of the British economy.

Zaha Hadid said: “This work is essential to deliver the most integrated transport solutions for London and the UK. It will enable London to maintain its position as one of the world’s most important economic, commercial and cultural centers; outlining the city’s future growth and development which has always been founded on global connectivity.”

See who made the list after the break…

Grimshaw Reveals Aviation Vision for London

Courtesy of Grimshaw Architects

Grimshaw Architects are the latest practice to add their voice to the debate surrounding the capacity problem of ’s airports. Their innovative proposal, entitled ‘London: Hub City’, bucks the trend of recent ‘superhub’ proposals, which are frequently suggested as a solution to the problem.

Instead of creating a large ‘ hub’ on a single site separated from the city, Grimshaw’s design prioritizes construction of new express lines by creating a ‘City Hub’ that allows passengers to transfer between London’s existing airports via the city center. The benefit being that expansion could be spread amongst its four existing airports incrementally, as needed, instead of being concentrated on the construction of one ‘super-hub’.

More on Grimshaw’s aviation proposal for London after the break.

Turkey Summons Bids for World’s Largest Airport

Istiklal Caddesi in , Turkey © Karissa Rosenfield

In an effort to maximize Istanbul’s potential of becoming a bustling regional hub, Transport Minister Binali Yildirim has released a request for proposals to construct and operate what could potentially be one of the world’s largest airports. With the Ataturk – Turkey’s largest which handled nearly 45 million passengers last year – steadily reaching capacity and limited by land restrictions, the new $9 billion dollar, six-runway promises to expand the country’s aviation capacity with the potential of handling 150 million yearly passengers.

“The new airport project will be bigger than any other in Turkey and will be part of our plan to build a new city on the Black Sea coast,” Yildirim said, according to Bloomberg.

More after the break.

Calatrava Withdraws from Denver Airport Expansion

Courtesy of , LLC

It was with much enthusiasm that Denver International Airport officials announced Santiago Calatrava as the architect for the new $650 million expansion that included a hotel, public plaza, and commuter-rail station. However, Calatrava is now withdrawing himself from the project only a year later. Numerous concerns have been cited as the reason for his departure including “financial constraints, unnecessary time delays, and deep divisions” between his design team, DIA, and Parsons International Group as quoted by his wife and business manager Robertina in a letter to DIA manager Kim Day.

Denver International Airport South Terminal / Santiago Calatrava

Courtesy of , LLC

Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava has unveiled his preliminary designs for the Denver International ’s (DIA) south terminal redevelopment program. The concept for the redevelopment will not only enhance the airport’s connectivity and functionality, but is also expected to create more than 6,600 jobs.

Cannes-Mandelieu Airport / Comte Vollenweider Architects

Comte Vollenweider Architects shared their winning design for the extension of Cannes airport with us.  The airport’s elegant construction focused on the functional side of improving the services offers concerning business aircraft, for both welcoming the crews and performances concerning plane’s maintenance.  The structure is an open volume, allowing the space to be maximized, which offers complete freedom to the planes and their to maneuver.

More about the project after the break.

Air Traffic Control Centre / SADAR + VUGA Architects

atcc-01Sadar Vuga Architects have shared with us their design for the air traffic control centre for the Brnik Airport in . The centre is conceived so as to provide security and enable high operativeness, 24-hour work comfort as well as comfort for the employees and visitors to the Centre. Furthermore, the Centre is designed according to all strict requirements of safety, operation and efficient functioning, but it is also envisaged as a special, memorable and symbolic building of the arrival in .

The Centre is designed as a compact shell that uncloses where natural lighting is needed in the interior. The compact building with a pentagonal ‘head’ of the Centre, which is tied to two administration ‘wings’ by the vertical hall in the central area of the Centre, is situated, for safety reasons, in the centre of a plot along the central boulevard of the future Airport City. The Centre is separated from the edge of the plot in the north by a parking platform and in the south by the tall greenery of the Centre’s garden. The Centre’s interior is organized into zones of various safety degrees. The more we move from the perimeter with administration offices and resting areas towards the free centre of the building, the higher the safety level.

More images after the break.