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AD Classics: TWA Flight Center / Eero Saarinen

04:00 - 13 June, 2016
AD Classics: TWA Flight Center / Eero Saarinen, © Cameron Blaylock
© Cameron Blaylock

Built in the early days of airline travel, the TWA Terminal is a concrete symbol of the rapid technological transformations which were fueled by the outset of the Second World War. Eero Saarinen sought to capture the sensation of flight in all aspects of the building, from a fluid and open interior, to the wing-like concrete shell of the roof. At TWA’s behest, Saarinen designed more than a functional terminal; he designed a monument to the airline and to aviation itself.

This AD Classic features a series of exclusive images by Cameron Blaylock, photographed in May 2016. Blaylock used a Contax camera and Zeiss lenses with Rollei black and white film to reflect camera technology of the 1960s.

© Cameron Blaylock © Cameron Blaylock © Cameron Blaylock © Cameron Blaylock +26

The New York Times Laments Poor Airport Design for Passengers

12:00 - 16 April, 2016
The New York Times Laments Poor Airport Design for Passengers, Interior of Beijing Airport by Foster + Partners
Interior of Beijing Airport by Foster + Partners

new article by Chris Holbrook for The New York Times, "Airports, Designed for Everyone but the Passenger," points out a black sheep among architectural typology: the airport. Though built for one of the most delicate and stressful human situations, airports are notoriously hostile to the travelers that occupy them.

Geographies of Uncertainty: Space and Territory in the Operational Logic of UPS

04:00 - 13 April, 2016
Geographies of Uncertainty: Space and Territory in the Operational Logic of UPS, Space and Territory in the Operational Logic of UPS. Image © Ghazal Jafari
Space and Territory in the Operational Logic of UPS. Image © Ghazal Jafari

The following article was first published by Volume Magazine in their 47th issue, The System*. You can read the Editorial of this issue, How Much Does Your System Weigh?here.

For the United Parcel Service (UPS), space is valued insofar as it grounds the socio-technical assemblages that secure the company’s economy of speed. Holding one of the largest airline fleets in the United States, UPS’s services range from delivering cargo for the US Air Force and e-commerce packages to relocating endangered animal species and partaking in disaster relief. It operationalizes logistics in the space between military and civilian domains and from the scale of cargo for large corporations to small packages for individuals. UPS runs a global logistics network that crosses more than 200 countries and territories and delivers about 17 million packages every day through its planetary ring of Shanghai-Shenzhen-Anchorage-Louisville-Cologne-Dubai.[1] It participates in the making of trans-border infrastructural systems and influences national politics towards the lifting of legal barriers to transnational trade. Yet what makes UPS significant is not its volume of shipment, infrastructural capacity, or magnitude of operational precision, but rather its resiliency and acute performance within the tides of uncertainty.

UNStudio Proposes User-Centric Design for the Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport

08:00 - 4 November, 2015
UNStudio Proposes User-Centric Design for the Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport, Aerial Rendered View. Image Courtesy of UNStudio
Aerial Rendered View. Image Courtesy of UNStudio

Following the selection of Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partnersproposal for the Taiwan Taouyuan International Airport as the winning design, UNStudio has released their own proposal, which received 2nd place. Called the “most innovative design concept” and the design that the jury “wanted to experience the most” by Michael Sparks (jury member and Dean and Professor at Syracuse University), the proposal, with a design team headed by Ben Van Berkel, re-imagines the scale of the airport typology. Read more about their shortlisted entry after the break.

Interior Rendered View. Image Courtesy of UNStudio Exterior Rendered View. Image Courtesy of UNStudio Interior Rendered View. Image Courtesy of UNStudio Interior Rendered View. Image Courtesy of UNStudio +13

The New LaGuardia Airport is "Lackluster and Uninspired"

09:30 - 11 August, 2015
The New LaGuardia Airport is "Lackluster and Uninspired", © Governor Andrew Cuomo
© Governor Andrew Cuomo

Two weeks ago, New York Governer Andrew Cuomo and Vice President Joe Biden unveiled a plan to transform LaGuardia airport into "a globally-renowned, 21st century airport that is worthy of the city and state of New York." However the redesign is not universally popular. In this article originally titled "The New LaGuardia Airport: Not Functional, Not Inspiring, Not an Icon," - the first of his regular column over at 6sqft - architecture critic Carter B. Horsley explains why "Queens deserves better."

The recent announcement by Governor Cuomo and Vice President Joe Biden of plans to “rebuild” La Guardia Airport at a cost of $4 billion was described in a Page One caption in The Post as “the end of an error,” a reference to the airport’s reputation that became tarnished over the years. Last October, Biden remarked that if someone had taken him to LaGuardia, he’d think he was in “some Third World country.”

Since its opening in 1939, when it accommodated “flying boats” at its Marine Air Terminal, the airport has not kept up with the growth of jumbo jets and air travel in general, but in the days of the Super Constellation passenger planes with their triple-tails and sloping noses, it was a very nice Art Deco place.

The published renderings that accompanied the announcement were not terribly reassuring, as they depicted a very long curved terminal with gangly tentacles raised over plane taxiways that hinted at torsos of praying mantises: an awkward rather than a graceful vault.

© Governor Andrew Cuomo © Governor Andrew Cuomo © Governor Andrew Cuomo © Governor Andrew Cuomo +15

New York's LaGuardia Airport to Get 21st Century Makeover

14:34 - 28 July, 2015
New York's LaGuardia Airport to Get 21st Century Makeover , © Governor Andrew Cuomo
© Governor Andrew Cuomo

Governor Andrew Cuomo has unveiled a $4 billion plan to redevelop New York's outdated LaGuardia Airport. Originally built in 1939, LaGuardia has been running inefficiently and overcapacity for decades.

The redesign, envisioned by HOK and Parsons Brinckerhoff, will unify the airport's fragmented terminals with a single roof, while providing expanded transportation access, elite passenger amenities and increased taxiway space. Terminal B will be replaced with a larger structure that will (eventually) connect to the renovated Terminals C and D. 

New Orlando International Airport Terminal Building – Call for Statements of Qualifications

10:00 - 21 May, 2015
New Orlando International Airport Terminal Building – Call for Statements of Qualifications

The Orlando International Airport ("OIA"), operated by the Greater Orlando Aviation Authority, seeks innovative, visionary architects and engineers for its planned, new airport terminal compound. OIA is a world-class airport that welcomes over 36 million business and leisure passengers per year.  In order to better accommodate its increasing number of passengers, especially in the international sector, OIA has under construction an Intermodal Terminal Facility for multiple modes of ground transportation, an Automated People Mover System connecting the main terminal, a 2,500 unit parking deck, and all associated horizontal infrastructure to support this program and the future expansion for a new terminal building. 

Zaha Hadid and ADPI Unveil Plans for World’s Largest Passenger Terminal in Beijing

00:00 - 5 February, 2015
Zaha Hadid and ADPI Unveil Plans for World’s Largest Passenger Terminal in Beijing , © ZHA / Methanoia
© ZHA / Methanoia

ADP Ingeniérie (ADPI) and Zaha Hadid Architects (ZHA) have unveiled designs for what will be the world’s largest airport passenger terminal - the Beijing New Airport Terminal Building. The Daxing scheme, based off the bid-winning planning concept by ADPI, hopes to alleviate traffic from Beijing’s existing Capital Airport, which is operating beyond its planned capacity.

“Initially accommodating 45 million passengers per year, the new terminal will be adaptable and sustainable, operating in many different configurations dependent on varying aircraft and passenger traffic throughout each day,” stated ZHA in a press release. “With an integrated multi-modal transport centre featuring direct links to local and national rail services including the Gaotie high speed rail, the new Daxing airport will be a key hub within Beijing’s growing transport network and a catalyst for the region’s economic development, including the city of Tianjin and Hebei Province.”

Safdie Architects Design Glass "Air Hub" for Singapore Changi Airport

00:00 - 5 December, 2014
Safdie Architects Design Glass "Air Hub" for Singapore Changi Airport, © Safdie Architects
© Safdie Architects

Today, Safdie Architects revealed plans for a glass, spherical “air hub” that will be built at the center of the Singapore’s Changi Airport, the world’s sixth busiest airport. The “jeweled” biodome was presented as a “new paradigm” for international airports that will boost Singapore’s stopover appeal and become a “lifestyle destination” for both travelers and local residents.

Learn more about the design and a word from Moshe Safdie, after the break. 

Rogers Stirk Harbour’s Geneva Airport Design Receives Planning Permission

00:00 - 27 November, 2014
Rogers Stirk Harbour’s Geneva Airport Design Receives Planning Permission , External view of Geneva Airport East Wing at dusk. Image Courtesy of RBI-T consortium
External view of Geneva Airport East Wing at dusk. Image Courtesy of RBI-T consortium

Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners’ (RSHP) design for the Geneva airport’s East Wing has received planning permission from the Federal Authorities in Switzerland. The 520 meter-long facility will connect to the airport’s existing terminal and includes additional Departures and Arrivals halls, contact stands and gate lounge seating as well as first class airlines lounges and technical basements, according to a press release.

Grimshaw Selected to Expand Peru's International Airport

00:00 - 21 October, 2014
Grimshaw Selected to Expand Peru's International Airport, Aeropuerto Internacional Jorge Chávez. Image Courtesy of LAP
Aeropuerto Internacional Jorge Chávez. Image Courtesy of LAP

Grimshaw has landed a $950 million expansion project for the Jorge Chávez International Airport in Lima, Peru. As reported by the Architect’s Journal, Grimshaw will work with ARCADIS, CH2MHill and Ramboll to design a seven million square meter scheme that will include a new air traffic control tower and second terminal for the international airport. Designs are set to be revealed in 2015.

ADPI Beats Foster + Partners to Land Beijing's Daxing Airport Competition

00:00 - 1 October, 2014
ADPI Beats Foster + Partners to Land Beijing's Daxing Airport Competition, Foster + Partners completed Terminal 3 at Beijing Capital International Airport in 2008. Image © Nigel Young / Foster + Partners
Foster + Partners completed Terminal 3 at Beijing Capital International Airport in 2008. Image © Nigel Young / Foster + Partners

ADP Ingénierie (ADPI), part of the French airport authority Aéroports de Paris (ADP), has won the competition to design Terminal 1 at Beijing's new Daxing Airport, beating both Foster + Partners, and a team composed of the China Civil Aviation Construction Group Corporation (CACC) and the Beijing Institute of Architectural Design. The design competition for the 700,000 square meter airport was announced in July 2011, with Beijing New Airport Construction Headquarters (BNAH) putting the submissions through "a long and rigorous selection process," according to ADP.

Foster lost out on the competition despite having designed Terminal 3 at Beijing's main airport, which at the time of completion in 2008 was the largest airport terminal in the world. However owing to the rapid rise in use of air transport in China that airport is already running at full capacity, necessitating the creation of another airport at Daxing, 60 kilometres south of Beijing.

JAHN, LOGUER + ADG Presents Proposal for New Mexico City Airport

01:00 - 21 September, 2014
JAHN, LOGUER + ADG Presents Proposal for New Mexico City Airport, Courtesy of JAHN
Courtesy of JAHN

Francisco Gonzalez-Pulido, chief designer and president of JAHN, has shared with us his net-zero design proposal for the new Mexico City International Airport competition. Similar to the Norman Foster and Fernando Romero's winning design, JAHN's proposal is a symbiotic blend of sensitive cultural meaning and powerful energy efficiency. As per competition requirements to pair an international firm with a Mexican firm, the project was the result of a collaboration with local architects Francisco Lopez-Guerra of LOGUER and Alonso de Garay of ADG

Courtesy of JAHN Courtesy of JAHN Courtesy of JAHN Courtesy of JAHN +8

New Details Released of Norman Foster and Fernando Romero's Designs for Mexico City's New Airport

00:00 - 4 September, 2014

Yesterday, a consortium led by Foster + Partners and Fernando Romero of FR-EE were announced as the winners of the competition for the design of Mexico City's new international airport. Designed in conjunction with a masterplan developed by Arup, the airport will initially include three runways, but is designed to expand to up to six runways by 2062, all served by the single terminal building.

One of the world's largest airport terminals at 555,000 square meters, the building is enclosed by a single, continuous lightweight gridshell, the largest of this type of structure ever built with spans reaching up to 170 meters.

By utilizing a single airport terminal, passengers will not need to travel on internal train services or underground tunnels, and the design of the building ensures shorter walking distances and few changes of level, all making for a more relaxing experience for users.

The building is designed to be the world's most sustainable airport, with the single lightweight shell using far less material than a cluster of buildings, and cooling and ventilation strategies that require little to no mechanical assistance for most of the year.

New Details Released of Norman Foster and Fernando Romero's Designs for Mexico City's New Airport

00:00 - 4 September, 2014
New Details Released of Norman Foster and Fernando Romero's Designs for Mexico City's New Airport, Image Captured from video via Foster + Partners
Image Captured from video via Foster + Partners

Yesterday, a consortium led by Foster + Partners and Fernando Romero of FR-EE were announced as the winners of the competition for the design of Mexico City's new international airport. Designed in conjunction with a masterplan developed by Arup, the airport will initially include three runways, but is designed to expand to up to six runways by 2062, all served by the single terminal building.

One of the world's largest airport terminals at 555,000 square meters, the building is enclosed by a single, continuous lightweight gridshell, the largest of this type of structure ever built with spans reaching up to 170 meters. By utilizing a single airport terminal, passengers will not need to travel on internal train services or underground tunnels, and the design of the building ensures shorter walking distances and few changes of level, all making for a more relaxing experience for users.

The building is designed to be the world's most sustainable airport, with the single lightweight shell using far less material than a cluster of buildings, and cooling and ventilation strategies that require little to no mechanical assistance for most of the year.

More details of the design after the break

UK Airports Commission Rules Out Thames Estuary Airport Plans

00:00 - 2 September, 2014
© Foster + Partners
© Foster + Partners

The Airports Commission, the independent group charged with planning the future of the London's airport infrastructure, has finally ruled out an ambitious plan for a major airport in the Thames Estuary designed by Foster + Partners and supported by London Mayor Boris Johnson. Chairman of the Airports Commission Sir Howard Davies said the proposal had been ruled out because "the economic disruption would be huge and there are environmental hurdles which it may prove impossible, or very time-consuming to surmount."

Instead, the Airports Commission will select between three options to expand one of London's existing airports at either Heathrow or Gatwick. Read on after the break for the reactions to the decision.

A Provocative Possible Future for Moscow's Failing Business District

00:00 - 5 July, 2014

What can you do with a business district that has an office vacancy rate of 40%, is completely separated from its surroundings and is facing increasing competition from business centers emerging throughout the city? These are questions that are increasingly being asked about Moscow's International Business District, the symbol of capitalism that was planned in 1992 after the fall of the Soviet Union, yet is still under construction today.

Eduardo Cassina and Liva Dudareva, founders of METASITU and researchers at the Strelka Institute, have proposed a provocative idea in response to this dilemma: envisaging the business district's future in 2041, they imagine a scenario where the district is linked by underground metro to Sheremetyevo And Domodedovo airports in the North and South - forming the world's first mega-airport, and the first one where it is possible to live in the terminal building without ever leaving.

Read on after the break for more explanation of idea

Diagram showing the locations of Stop Over City and the two existing airports. Image Courtesy of Eduardo Cassina and Liva Dudareva In many ways, Stop Over City is more closely related to the global airports it is connected to than to the city outside its doors. Image Courtesy of Eduardo Cassina and Liva Dudareva An underground tunnel connecting buildings in Stop Over City. Image Courtesy of Eduardo Cassina and Liva Dudareva The entrance hall in Stop Over City. Image Courtesy of Eduardo Cassina and Liva Dudareva +7

Norman Foster Reasserts Belief in Thames Estuary Airport

00:00 - 28 May, 2014
Norman Foster Reasserts Belief in Thames Estuary Airport, © Foster + Partners
© Foster + Partners

In response to the UK Airports Commission's call for evidence, Foster + Partners has released a detailed feasibility study supporting their plans for a new airport on the Isle of Grain in the Thames Estuary. Their plan proposes a four-runway airport built on a 35 square kilometre platform constructed partially in the mouth of the Thames. The scheme is popularly called "Boris Island" thanks to its most prominent supporter, Mayor of London Boris Johnson.

Norman Foster said "Since the Airports Commission submission a year ago, the need for increased airport capacity has become even more urgent. It is time to get serious about the issue of airport capacity. Britain needs an effective long-term solution, not the usual short-term fix that is Heathrow’s proposed third runway. London today needs to follow in the footsteps of its nineteenth-century forebears and invest boldly in infrastructure. Only long-term thinking will properly serve the demands of our future generations."

Read on for a breakdown of the information contained in the report