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Exhibition

Palm Springs Art Museum Opens Exhibit on Lina Bo Bardi and Albert Frey

14:00 - 8 October, 2017
Palm Springs Art Museum Opens Exhibit on Lina Bo Bardi and Albert Frey, © Lance Gerber
© Lance Gerber

Mid-century modern visionaries, Albert Frey and Lina Bo Bardi are exhibited together at the Palm Springs Art Museum for an unprecedented show of models, drawings, design objects, and photographs, opened this fall and will remain on exhibit through January 7, 2018. 

The exhibit A Search for Living Architecture explores the shared belief of Albert Frey and Lina Bo Bardi, that architecture is a way to connect people, nature, building, and living. The mid-century show-stoppers are highlighted in the installation design by Bestor Architecture.

© Lance Gerber © Lance Gerber © Lance Gerber © Lance Gerber + 26

How Architects in Chicago Are Making New History

10:20 - 26 September, 2017

"We are at a moment of great cultural transition," Jorge Otero-Pailos argues. "The kinds of objects that we look to to provide some sort of continuity in that transformation is often times architecture, [...] one of the most stable objects in culture." This short film, in which an number of participants of the 2017 Chicago Architecture Biennial reflect on their work and those of others, tackles the theme conceived by artistic directors Sharon Johnston and Mark LeeMake New History.

Towards an Architecture of Light, Color, and Virtual Experiences

12:00 - 25 September, 2017

This essay by Space Popular references an installation currently on display at Sto Werkstatt, in London. You can experience it in virtual reality, here.

The Glass House has no purpose other than to be beautiful. It is intended purely as a structure for exhibition and should be a beautiful source of ideas for “lasting” architecture but is not intended as such. According to the poet Paul Scheerbart, to whom it is dedicated, the Glass House should inspire the disillusion of current architecture’s far-too-restricted understanding of space and should introduce the effects and possibilities of glass into the world of architecture.

Bruno Taut [above] described his Glashaus for the 1914 Werkbund Exhibition in Cologne, Germany, as a "little temple of beauty"; as "reflections of light whose colors began at the base with a dark blue and rose up through moss green and golden yellow to culminate at the top in a luminous pale yellow.”[1] The Glass Pavilion, designed based on its potential effects on those who perceived it, was supposed to create vivid experiences. The site was the human mind.

The Glass Chain / Space Popular (Sto Werkstatt, London). Image © Space Popular The Glass Chain / Space Popular (Sto Werkstatt, London). Image © Space Popular The Glass Chain / Space Popular (Sto Werkstatt, London). Image © Space Popular The Glass Chain / Space Popular (Sto Werkstatt, London). Image © Space Popular + 15

In "Horizontal City," 24 Architects Reconsider Architectural Interiors at 2017 Chicago Architecture Biennial

10:20 - 25 September, 2017

Horizontal City is one of two collective exhibitions (the other being Vertical City) at the 2017 Chicago Architecture Biennial. 24 architects were tasked by artistic directors Sharon Johnston and Mark Lee to "reconsider the status of the architectural interior" by referencing a photograph of a canonical interior from any time period.

Their challenge was in considering the forms and ways that their selection "might extrapolate out from the cropped photographic frame into a spatial and lifestyle construction across a larger, horizontal site" – in this case, a field of plinths, the size and positioning of which is a direct reference to the footprint of Mies van der Rohe's 1947 plan for the IIT Campus in Chicago.

5x5 Exhibition Features 25 Provocative Models by Young Architects

06:00 - 1 August, 2017
5x5 Exhibition Features 25 Provocative Models by Young Architects, © Robert Prochaska
© Robert Prochaska

Architecture Exhibition 5x5 Participatory Provocations opened its doors at the New York Center for Architecture on July 11, featuring 25 models by 25 young American architecture firms. The exhibition engages its participants to take clear stances on a series of provocative issues facing architecture today, with their models “producing a physical expression or provocation that is then made available to the public.” Curated by Kevin Erickson, Julia van den Hout, and Kyle May, the exhibition argues for “participatory criticism” covering growing income gaps, immigration, globalization, technology’s impact on our lives, surveillance, and power.

Courtesy of 5x5 © Robert Prochaska © Robert Prochaska © Robert Prochaska + 45

Pablo Bronstein to Exhibit an Exploration of "Pseudo-Georgian Architecture" at London's RIBA

04:00 - 27 July, 2017
Pablo Bronstein to Exhibit an Exploration of "Pseudo-Georgian Architecture" at London's RIBA, Detail: 132-135 Sewardstone Road, Victoria Park E2 9JQ. Ink on Paper, 21 x 14 cm. Copyright Pablo Bronstein, 2017. Courtesy Herald St, London and Galeria Franco Noero, Turin. Image Courtesy of RIBA
Detail: 132-135 Sewardstone Road, Victoria Park E2 9JQ. Ink on Paper, 21 x 14 cm. Copyright Pablo Bronstein, 2017. Courtesy Herald St, London and Galeria Franco Noero, Turin. Image Courtesy of RIBA

A new exhibition of commissioned work by artist Pablo Bronstein at London's Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) will explore "ubiquitous" neo-Georgian developments as exemplar of a British vernacular. The show—Pablo Bronstein: Conservatism, or The Long Reign of Pseudo-Georgian Architecture—will feature fifty new drawings of buildings constructed during the second half of the 20th Century in "an ostensibly neo-Georgian style." These will be presented alongside historical Georgian and neo-Georgian material chosen by Bronstein from the RIBA’s collections.

Leathermarket Court, Leathermarket Street, Southwark SE1 3HS. Ink on Paper, 21 x 14 cm. Copyright Pablo Bronstein, 2017. Courtesy Herald St, London and Galeria Franco Noero, Turin. Image Courtesy of RIBA 428 Hackney Road, corner of Temple Street, E2 7AP. Ink on Paper, 21 x 14 cm. Copyright Pablo Bronstein. Courtesy Herald St, London and Galeria Franco Noero, Turin. Image Courtesy of RIBA 1 Haverstock Street, Haverstock Place, Islington, N1 8BX. Ink on Paper, 21 x 14 cm. Copyright Pablo Bronstein, 2017. Courtesy Herald St, London and Galeria Franco Noero, Turin. Image Courtesy of RIBA 1-4 Cassland Road and Well Street, Hackney E9 7AN. Ink on Paper, 21 x 14 cm. Copyright Pablo Bronstein, 2017. Courtesy Herald St, London and Galeria Franco Noero, Turin. Image Courtesy of RIBA + 9

Fernando Guerra: A Photography Practice Under X-Ray

14:50 - 11 July, 2017
Fernando Guerra: A Photography Practice Under X-Ray, Image © Fernando Guerra
Image © Fernando Guerra

With the new millennium, architectural photography has gained exponential prominence in the relationship that architects have with society. The FG+SG studio has taken on the challenges presented by the greater media impact of architecture, which today constitutes a photographic practice rewarded with international prizes and recognition.

The Norman Foster Foundation's Wing-Shaped Pavilion Provides a Home for Le Corbusier's Car

07:00 - 21 June, 2017
The Norman Foster Foundation's Wing-Shaped Pavilion Provides a Home for Le Corbusier's Car, © Guillermo Rodríguez
© Guillermo Rodríguez

Earlier this month, the Norman Foster Foundation opened its doors in central Madrid. Inhabiting in an old residential palace, and having undergone extensive renovation works since, the Foundation have also constructed their own contemporary courtyard pavilion. Housing a treasure trove of artefacts from Lord Foster's personal collection, the structure—which is shaped like the wing of an aircraft—also exhibits a newly restored 1927 Avions Voisin C7 originally owned by Le Corbusier.

© Guillermo Rodríguez © Guillermo Rodríguez © Guillermo Rodríguez © Guillermo Rodríguez + 13

The Exhibition Hall of Crime Evidences in Harbin / Architectural Design & Research Institute of SCUT

20:00 - 15 June, 2017
The Exhibition Hall of Crime Evidences in Harbin / Architectural Design & Research Institute of SCUT, Building entrance. Image © Yao li
Building entrance. Image © Yao li

Sunken courtyard. Image © Yao li Birdview. Image © Yao li Meditation atrium. Image © Yao li View from railway. Image © Yao li + 31

  • Architects

    Architectural Design & Research Institute of SCUT
  • Location

    Harbin, Heilongjiang Province, China
  • Principal Architect

    He Jingtang
  • Project Year

    2015

OMA/AMO-Designed Exhibition lR100-Rinascente: Stories of Innovation Debuts in Milan

10:15 - 24 May, 2017
OMA/AMO-Designed Exhibition lR100-Rinascente: Stories of Innovation Debuts in Milan, lR100-Rinascente: Stories of Innovation. Image © Agostino Osio, Courtesy of OMA
lR100-Rinascente: Stories of Innovation. Image © Agostino Osio, Courtesy of OMA

A new exhibition by OMA/AMO,  lR100-Rinascente: Stories of Innovation, has officially opened in Milan’s Palazzo Reale. Marking the 100th anniversary of the classic Italian department store, la Rinascente, the exhibition commemorates the company’s long creative history and experimental spirit that has served as an influential part of Italian design, culture and commerce.

lR100-Rinascente: Stories of Innovation. Image © Agostino Osio, Courtesy of OMA lR100-Rinascente: Stories of Innovation. Image © Agostino Osio, Courtesy of OMA Courtesy of Rinascente Courtesy of Rinascente + 30

Are These "The World's Best Graduation Projects" of 2017?

07:30 - 7 April, 2017
Are These "The World's Best Graduation Projects" of 2017?, Award-winning ‘Badabing Badaboom’ by Jason Tan (Singapore) presents a Gold House in Dunkwa, Ghana, to house the Gold Exchange and the Miners Union. This ‘gift’ from the Chinese is a metaphor for China’s neo-colonial presence in Ghana and Africa. Image Courtesy of Archiprix International
Award-winning ‘Badabing Badaboom’ by Jason Tan (Singapore) presents a Gold House in Dunkwa, Ghana, to house the Gold Exchange and the Miners Union. This ‘gift’ from the Chinese is a metaphor for China’s neo-colonial presence in Ghana and Africa. Image Courtesy of Archiprix International

Once every two years architecture schools around the world are invited to submit their single, finest graduation project to the Archiprix International competition and exhibition. This year, the event selected Ahmedabad, in India, to exhibit the results. Here Arjen Oosterman, Editor-in-Chief of Volume, reviews the event and the work on display. You can read an interview with the Director of Archiprix, Henk van der Veen, here.

From its inception at the dawn of the millennium (2001), Archiprix International has proved to be an adventure with enormous ambition. To collect, once every two years, the very best graduation projects from architecture, landscape architecture, and urban design schools around the world is no small feat. To comprehensively exhibit this material is also a challenge, and to create a meaningful and productive event around the award session—giving center stage to the selected graduates and their projects—is a task akin to walking a tightrope. And yet, this is what they are achieving.

Award-winning ‘Housing for Construction Workers in Ahmedabad’, designed by Hannah Broatch (Auckland, New Zealand), confronts the poor living conditions of migrant workers. Image Courtesy of Archiprix International Both Nominee and Participants’ favorite (24 votes), ‘Walk Around Music’ by Hannah LaSota (University Park, USA) locates a Sensorium in underground Detroit ‘to evoke motion and elicit emotion’. Image Courtesy of Archiprix International Both Nominee and Participants’ favorite (24 votes), ‘Walk Around Music’ by Hannah LaSota (University Park, USA) locates a Sensorium in underground Detroit ‘to evoke motion and elicit emotion’. Image Courtesy of Archiprix International ‘A Different Kind of Museum’ by Andrei Puică (Timisoara, Romania) recycles abandoned rural homes. The plan addresses conservation, modernity, urbanization and cultural identity in one gesture. The project was selected as participants’ favorite (19 votes). Image Courtesy of Archiprix International + 7

AD Classics: 1988 Deconstructivist Exhibition at New York's Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)

07:00 - 29 March, 2017
AD Classics: 1988 Deconstructivist Exhibition at New York's Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), View into the exhibition (1988). Photographer unknown. Image via MoMA
View into the exhibition (1988). Photographer unknown. Image via MoMA

When Philip Johnson curated the Museum of Modern Arts’ (MoMA) 1932 “International Exhibition of Modern Architecture,” he did so with the explicit intention of defining the International Style. As a guest curator at the same institution in 1988 alongside Mark Wigley (now Dean Emeritus of the Columbia GSAPP), Johnson took the opposite approach: rather than present architecture derived from a rigidly uniform set of design principles, he gathered a collection of work by architects whose similar (but not identical) approaches had yielded similar results. The designers he selected—Peter Eisenman, Frank Gehry, Zaha Hadid, Rem Koolhaas, Daniel Libeskind, Bernard Tschumi, and the firm Coop Himmelblau (led by Wolf Prix)—would prove to be some of the most influential architects of the late 20th Century to the present day.[1,2]

Inside the exhibition (1988). Photographer unknown. Image via MoMA Inside the exhibition (1988). Photographer unknown. Image via MoMA Inside the exhibition (1988). Photographer unknown. Image via MoMA 1988 Catalogue Cover. Image via MoMA + 6

MAAT Opens with "Utopia/Dystopia – A Paradigm Shift" Exhibition

07:30 - 23 March, 2017
MAAT Opens with "Utopia/Dystopia – A Paradigm Shift" Exhibition, Utopia/Dystopia – A Paradigm Shift. Image Courtesy of MAAT
Utopia/Dystopia – A Paradigm Shift. Image Courtesy of MAAT

Following its official opening on October 5, 2016, the new MAAT building reopened to the public on March 22, 2017, with two major exhibitions that take up the whole building: Utopia/Dystopia – A Paradigm Shift, curated by Pedro Gadanho, João Laia and Susana Ventura – and Order and Progress by Mexican artist Héctor Zamora, curated by Inês Grosso.

80 at 80 Exhibition to Celebrate the Architectural Career of Sir Peter Cook

12:00 - 17 February, 2017
Courtesy of Bartlett School of Architecture
Courtesy of Bartlett School of Architecture

The Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL, is celebrating the opening of its new building at 22 Gordon Street with an exhibition of work by visionary architect Sir Peter Cook. Running from 23 February to 10 March 2017, the exhibition marks Sir Peter’s 80th year with a celebration of 80 of his inspired and pioneering projects.

Exhibition Examining Cesare Leonardi To Open in Genoa

08:30 - 16 February, 2017
Exhibition Examining Cesare Leonardi To Open in Genoa, Cesare Leonardi, Franca Stagi, "11.3.1 Carpinus Betulus," 1978–1982
Cesare Leonardi, Franca Stagi, "11.3.1 Carpinus Betulus," 1978–1982

The Villa Croce Museum of Contemporary Art presents the first monographic exhibition on the work of Cesare Leonardi (Italian, b. 1935). In the course of a career spanning more than four decades Leonardi, an architect and photographer, has continuously challenged the boundary between design and artistic practice. In spite of the recognition gained by his early furniture design, most of Leonardi’s oeuvre has remained little known, even within Italy. Cesare Leonardi: Strutture, organised in close cooperation with Leonardi’s archive, sheds light on an intimate yet multifaceted body of work.

A Look at Pierre Chareau, the Mysterious Man Behind the Maison de Verre

09:30 - 11 February, 2017
A Look at Pierre Chareau, the Mysterious Man Behind the Maison de Verre, Pierre Chareau (French, 1883-1950) and Bernard Bijvoet (Dutch, 1889-1979), Maison de Verre, 1928-1932. Image © Mark Lyon
Pierre Chareau (French, 1883-1950) and Bernard Bijvoet (Dutch, 1889-1979), Maison de Verre, 1928-1932. Image © Mark Lyon

This article was originally published on Metropolis Magazine as "New Retrospective Glimpses the Man Behind the Maison de Verre."

Pierre Chareau was an architect whose buildings have almost all been demolished; an interior designer whose designs have all been remodeled; and a film set designer whose films you cannot see. These are not the most auspicious circumstances on which to mount a retrospective, but an ongoing exhibition at the Jewish Museum, imaginatively designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro (DS+R), attempts it nonetheless.

Chareau, who is best known for his one surviving building, the Maison de Verre in Paris, defies neat classification. Without any sort of architectural training, he worked briefly as a furniture designer for a British firm then struck out on his own, creating an idiosyncratic corpus of furniture, interior designs for life and cinema, and even several homes.

The second-floor balcony of the house that Pierre Chareau designed for Robert Motherwell in East Hampton, New York, 1947. Image Courtesy of Miguel Saco Furniture and Restoration, Inc., New York Table and bookcase (MB960), c. 1930, designed by Pierre Chareau, walnut and black patinated wrought iron. Image © Ken Collins, image provided by Gallery Vallois America, LLC An installation view of the exhibition Pierre Chareau: Modern Architecture and Design. The exhibition design was executed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro. Image Courtesy of Will Ragozzino/SocialShutterbug.com Pierre Chareau, Office, 1924, pochoir print; 8 13/16 x 10 x 7/16 in. Private Collection. Image © John Blazejewski, Marquand Library, Princeton University + 11

Humanity and Art Entwined - How NADAAA's Exhibit Became Blankets for Syrian Refugees

08:00 - 10 February, 2017
Humanity and Art Entwined - How NADAAA's Exhibit Became Blankets for Syrian Refugees, The exhibit was hung from the roof of the Electric Hanger exhibition hall. Image © Roland Halbe
The exhibit was hung from the roof of the Electric Hanger exhibition hall. Image © Roland Halbe

Jordanian artist Raya Kassisieh, with the support of American firm NADAAA, has repurposed her exhibit from the Amman Design Week in Jordan to create blankets for Syrian refugees and Jordanian families. The Entrelac exhibit, created by Kassisieh and NADAAA, consists of 300kg of hand-knit, un-dyed wool which was later cut and stitched to create blankets for those fleeing the Syrian Civil War, now approaching its sixth year.

The exhibit was displayed at the Amman Design Festival in September 2016. Image © Roland Halbe The exhibit was stitched into blankets to aid Syrian refugees. Image Courtesy of Amman Design Week The exhibit was stitched into blankets to aid Syrian refugees. Image Courtesy of Amman Design Week The exhibit is made of hand-knit, un-dyed wool. Image Courtesy of Amman Design Week + 11

India Arch Dialogue 2017

10:12 - 7 February, 2017
India Arch Dialogue 2017

An exhibition that comprises of sketches of 20 internationally renowned architectural minds will be on display at Gallery 1AQ, a gallery in the foreshadow of the iconic Qutab Minar, an ancient Mughal monument from 3 - 21 February, 2017. Along with the exhibit, there will be interactive events over 3 weeks where design powerhouses from around the globe and across different platforms will be presenting. The same has been curated by the Verendra Wakhloo and Rachit Srivastava.