Please Touch the Art: Jeppe Heine’s “Labyrinth NY” Installed in Brooklyn

“Mirror Labyrinth NY”, Jeppe Hein (2015), High polished stainless steel, aluminum,106.5 x 346.5 x 338.5 inches

For the next year, visitors at New York’s Brooklyn Bridge Park will have the chance to interact with “Please Touch the Art”, an  of works by Danish artist Jeppe Hein. Playful, inventive, and immediately striking, Hein’s work engages audiences as “active participants,” inviting spontaneity and user interaction. Curated by Nicholas Baume, the exhibition contains three bodies of work by Hein: the soaring water jets of Appearing Rooms, the sixteen bright red benches of Modified Social Benches, and the reflective vertical planks of Mirror Labyrinth NY.

The exhibition is a project of New York City’s Public Art Fund, a non-profit organization responsible for numerous free exhibitions offering “powerful experiences with art and the urban environment”.

Learn more about the Mirror Labyrinth NY installation and view selected images after the break.

Assemble to Construct a Brutalist Playground at RIBA

© Assemble and Simon Terrill

Starting June 10, the RIBA will present The Brutalist Playground - an exhibition that is part sculpture, part architectural installation, which invites people of all ages to come and play, the Brutalist way. Occupying the entire Architecture Gallery, the immersive landscape is a new commission by Turner Prize nominated design and architecture collective Assemble and artist Simon Terrill. It explores the abstract concrete playgrounds that were designed as part of Brutalist housing estates in the mid-twentieth century, but which no longer exist. They became playgrounds unsuitable for play.

David Adjaye’s Temporary Museum Hosts “All the World’s Future’s” at Venice’s 56th International Art Exhibition

Courtesy of Adjaye Associates

A temporary pavilion designed by London-based firm Adjaye Associates is housing a selection of works for the 56th International Art Exhibition, ”All the World’s Futures,” in Venice. Curated by Okwui Enwezor, the exhibition explores the numerous ways in which art can be experienced in “an unfolding of typologies.” Adjaye Associate’s temporary seeks to parallel Enwezor’s curatorial vision, and is nestled within a 316-meter-long, 16th-century ship-building warehouse in the Arsenale district.

MoMA’s Barry Bergdoll On “The Politics And Poetics Of Developmentalism” In Latin American Architecture

Eladio Dieste. Church in Atlantida, Uruguay, 1958. Image © Leonardo Finotti

On display until July 19th, MoMA‘s exhibition “Latin America in Construction: Architecture 1955-1980” is an attempt to bring the architecture of this global region, and this time period, to a greater audience after decades of neglect by the architectural establishment. Curated by , the exhibition effectively follows on from MoMA’s last engagement with the topic of Latin American architecture, way back in 1955 with Henry-Russell Hitchcock‘s exhibition “Latin American Architecture Since 1945.” In an intriguing interview, Bergdoll sits down with Metropolis Magazine to talk about why he is revisiting the topic after so many years (or, indeed, why MoMA took so long to do so), and explains his ambitions to elevate the featured works and to frame Latin America itself as “not simply as a place where the pupils of Le Corbusier went to build, but a place of origins of ideas.” Read the full interview here.

Vitra Design Museum’s Manuel Herz On The “Heroic” Modern Architecture Of Africa

La Pyramide, Abidjan (Côte d’Ivoire), by Rinaldo Olivieri, 1973. Image © Iwan Baan

On display until May 31st, the Vitra Design ’s “Architecture of Independence – African Modernism” exhibition displays a cross-section of ’s experimental architecture from the post-colonial years of the 1960s. Covering more than 80 projects in Kenya, Zambia, Ghana, Côte d’Ivoire, and Senegal, the exhibition aims to shed light on this little-known period of architecture history, and challenge Western notions of African countries. In this interview, originally published by Metropolis Magazine as “Q&A: Curator Manuel Herz on Africa’s ‘Grandiose’ Modern Architecture,” Curator Manuel Herz reveals the origins of the exhibition and shares his thoughts light on some of the buildings which the exhibition highlights.

Clare Dowdy: What triggered your interest in the post-colonial architecture of Central and Sub-Saharan Africa?

Manuel Herz: I was in Nairobi a couple of times around 2007 and noticed the architecture of that period was of outstanding quality but virtually unknown outside Kenya. This triggered an interest to research the whole of Sub-Saharan Africa. I found that the political urgency that existed at the time of the independence process is embodied in the architecture.

“Lina Bo Bardi: Together” Opens at The Graham Foundation

Courtesy of The Graham Foundation

From April 25 through July 25, 2015, the Graham Foundation will host an exhibition at its Madlener House showcasing the vision of Italian-Brazilian architect Lina Bo Bardi. Known for her emphasis on social modernism and expressive use of materials, Lina Bo Bardi: Together explores her legacy through her collected works, as well as that of other artists paying homage to the architect and striving to generate new conversations about her designs. Curated by Noemi Blager, the exhibition features photographs, films, and artistic objects reflecting Bo Bardi’s diverse work and immersion in Brazilian culture.

Group Exhibition at the Frac Centre to Explore the History of the Relief

Peaks, « Terminal de ferry, Geiranger, Norvège / Premier prix, concours international 120H, en collaboration avec Hugo Enlart », 2013 © Peaks

From April 10, the Frac Centre will host “Relief(s)— Designing the Horizon”, a series of exhibitions, workshops, and meetings exploring the place of the relief in the timeline of modern art. Over five months the work of Yasuaki Onishi, Gérard Singer, and Aurélie Pétrel will be on display alongside a host of  supplementary cultural and educational programs. Hoping to “[shed] new light on the way in which contemporary art can renew our reading of the landscape and, more broadly the environment”, the will run until September 19. Learn more about the artists involved and view selected works after the break.

FAT And Crimson’s ‘A Clockwork Jerusalem’ To Be Exhibited In London

Electric Pastoral. Image © FAT Architecture /

A Clockwork Jerusalem, the exhibition showcased in the British Pavilion at last year’s Venice Biennale, will make it’s debut at London’s Architectural Association (AA) next month. Commissioned by the British Council and curated by Sam Jacob, co-founder of FAT, and , partner at Dutch practice Crimson Architectural Historians, the exhibition shines a light on the large scale projects of the 1950’s, 60’s and 70’s by exploring the “mature flowering of British Modernism at the moment it was at its most socially, politically and architecturally ambitious – but also the moment that witnessed its collapse.”

Look & Listen: A New Sound Responsive Exhibition In London

© G. G. Archard

Look & Listen, a new sound responsive at the recently opened  gallery in London, explores “the often unnoticed, yet vital role acoustics play in our experience of place.” Designed by The Klassnik Corporation, the exhibition offers a variety of “sonic experiences” which encourage the visitor to focus on the audible aspects of architecture. It creates a unique set of environments built using Sto’s range of acoustic systems, “utilising the perfect balance of design flexibility and technical leadership the acoustic materials offer.” The installation also demonstrates the materials‘ capabilities in reducing reverberation and promoting clearer sound.

“Superstructure”: 11 Projects That Defined Kiev’s Soviet Modernism

Pavilion “Transport”, from the Exhibition of Achievements of the National Economy of USSR. Image Courtesy of Valentyn Shtolko

Around the globe, the post-war years were a period of optimism and extreme experimentation. On both sides of the cold war’s ideological divide, this optimism found its greatest expression, architecturally speaking, in modernism - but of course, the particular circumstances of each city offered a unique spin on the modernist project. According to the curators of “Superstructure,” an exhibition presented at Kiev’s Visual Culture Research Center from January 28th to February 28th, the utopian architectural works of Kiev represented ”an attempt to transform the city into the environment for materialization of artistic thinking – in contrast to the strict unification of city space by typical construction and residential blocks.” Architects such as Edward Bilsky and Florian Yuriyev, often working in collaboration with artists such as Ada Rybachuk and Volodymyr Melnychenko attempted to create projects that were a complete synthesis of architecture and art – an approach to design that often didn’t sit well with the Ukrainian authorities of the time.

Featuring research by Alex Bykov, Oleksandr Burlaka and Oleksiy Radynski, “Superstructure” examined the projects which were typical of this particular cultural moment in Kiev. After the break, we present this research, and a selection of images from the exhibition.

The Hombroich Foundation Presents “Souto de Moura 1980 – 2015″

Casa das Historias – Museu Paula Rego / Eduardo Souto de Moura. Image © Luis Ferreira Alves

From April 18 until August 24, 2015, the will showcase the work of Pritzker Prize-winning architect Eduardo Souto de Moura. Spanning from his early career in 1980 to the present, the will explore de Moura’s influential style through models, plans, sketches and photographs. Celebrating such dynamic works as the reconstruction of the Franciscan convent of Santa Maria do Bouro in Amares and the the football stadium Estádio Municipal de Braga, highlighted projects will tell the lifelong story of de Moura’s designs.

See Inside Le Corbusier’s Mind with These 5 Paintings

Taureau (Bull), 1956; Sheet metal plaque, enameled (Unique work, painted with enamel on sheet metal by Le Corbusier and fired in the studio of Jean Martin in Luynes) (46 x 55 cm). Image © Galerie Eric Mouchet –

Marking the fiftieth anniversary of Le Corbusier’s death, Galerie Eric Mouchet is collaborating with Galerie Zlotowski to showcase Le Corbusier: Panorama of a Lifetime’s Work in Paris. The , opening April 23 and on view through July 25, will provide a comprehensive overview of paintings, drawings and engravings of the legendary Le Corbusier.

“Le Corbusier, who was never without a sketchbook in his pocket, devoted half of every day over a 45 year period to writing, painting and drawing – what he called his ‘Atelier de la recherché patiente,’” says the galleries. “His visual arts output was both highly original and prolific, stretching from 1917 to 1965. Up to the Second World War, this work was largely for his own personal research. Later, however, it helped drive the design and promotion of the Modulor, a ‘harmonious’ scale of proportions he devised in 1946.”

Take a look inside Le Corbusier’s mind and preview five of the prolific paintings that will be exhibited, after the break. 

Latin America in Construction: Architecture 1955-1980

Affonso Eduardo Reidy. of Modern Art of Rio de Janeiro (MAM), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 1934-1947. ©Núcleo de Documentação e Pesquisa – Faculdade de Arquitetura e Urbanismo da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro

In 1955 the Museum of Modern Art staged Latin American Architecture since 1945, a landmark survey of modern architecture in Latin America. On the 60th anniversary of that important show, the Museum returns to the region to offer a complex overview of the positions, debates, and architectural creativity from Mexico and Cuba to the Southern Cone between 1955 and the early 1980s.

More about Latin America in Construction: Architecture 1955-1980, opening at MoMA on March 29th, after the break. 

London’s Architectural Association Exhibits Futuristic Work of Jan Kaplický

© Jan Kaplický

Now on view at ’s Architectural Association, Jan Kaplický Drawings presents work by the Czech architect Jan Kaplický (1937-2009) – a visionary designer with a passion for drawing as a means of discovering, describing and constructing. Through drawing he presented beguiling architectural imagery of the highest order.

The earliest projects date from the early 1970s when, for Kaplický, drawing was essentially a speculative pursuit. Whilst his days were spent working for other architects, during evenings and weekends he designed and drew at home. His architecture at this time was the plan and the finely detailed cross-section. Never satisfied, he constantly developed and honed his graphic language, perfecting the technique of the cutaway isometric which became his trademark.

A preview of Kaplický’s drawings, after the break. 

Photographic Exhibition Highlights The Relationship Between Brick And The Dutch

Courtesy of Het Nieuwe Instituut

Builds in Brick is one of the latest exhibitions at Het Nieuwe Instituut (formerly the NAi) in Rotterdam. It seeks to modify the “assumed triumph of ” in the interwar period, drawing upon two photographic collections from the Institute’s extensive archives. The exhibition has been curated to highlight that brick remained the favoured construction material throughout the advocacy of the Modernist movement, even for experimental construction.

Explore Alexander Brodsky’s Architectural Fantasy at Berlin’s Tchoban Foundation

“Place of Overall Prosperity”, (1998). Image Courtesy of Tchoban Foundation. Museum for Architectural Drawing

From March 13, Berlin’s Tchoban Foundation Museum for Architectural Drawing will showcase the work of acclaimed Russian artist and architect Alexander Brodsky in the eponymous “Alexander Brodsky. Works.”

Curated by Daria Paramonova, architect and co-curator of the Russian Pavilion at the 2014 Venice Biennale, the exhibition will feature a collection of Brodsky’s new and old work and run until June 5.

Learn more about the exhibition and view selected works on display after the break.

Frank Lloyd Wright and Fay Jones on the Web: The Value of Online Exhibitions

Alexander Residence (Raheen) Swimming Pool. Image © Fay Jones Collection, Special Collections, University of Arkansas Libraries

Yesterday afternoon, I was able to visit the University of Arkansas “Fay Jones and : Organic Architecture Comes to Arkansas” – without purchasing a ticket or leaving my apartment. This extensive exhibition on the life and development of these two notable architects was made possible through a collaboration between University of Arkansas Libraries’ Special Collections and Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art Library and Archives. Exhibitions such as this are part of a broader movement in recent years towards making archived content more easily accessible to the public through web platforms. The concept of the online exhibition, however, is still in its infancy and there remains significant room for innovation.

URBAN TALES to Explore the Future of Cities

‘New St James’ Park’. Image Courtesy of Ned Scott

URBAN TALES will showcase three distinct architectural artwork series exploring visions of narrative based city redevelopments. Featuring Presidents Medal-winning work, these original and engaging threads of imagery from UCL architecture graduates Ned Scott, Nick Elias and Anja Kempa objectify fiction and challenge political reality. The exhibitors question the role of architecture in a changing world and use fictional narratives to design fantastical, but possible, cities. URBAN TALES will kick off with an opening party on Friday, March 6 and remain on view through April 10, 2015 at Carousel London. Read on to learn more.