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Rasmus Hjortshõj

BROWSE ALL FROM THIS PHOTOGRAPHER HERE

World Photo Day 2017: Our Readers’ 100 Most-Bookmarked Architectural Photographs

08:00 - 19 August, 2017

This August 19th is World Photo Day, which celebrates photography on the anniversary of the day on which France bought the patent for the daguerreotype, one of the earliest photographic processes, and released it to the world for free in 1839. At ArchDaily, we understand the importance of photography in architecture—not only as a tool for recording designs, but also as a discipline that many of us enjoy. To celebrate the occasion, we decided to reveal the most popular images ever published on ArchDaily, as selected by you, our readers. Using data gathered from My ArchDaily, we have ranked the 100 most-saved images from our database; read on to see them.

Cubic Houses / ADEPT

03:00 - 15 August, 2017
Cubic Houses / ADEPT, © Rasmus Hjortshøj
© Rasmus Hjortshøj

© Rasmus Hjortshøj © Rasmus Hjortshøj © Rasmus Hjortshøj © Rasmus Hjortshøj +19

  • Architects

  • Location

    Copenhagen, Denmark
  • Area

    125000.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2017
  • Photographs

Peter Zumthor's Kolumba Museum Through the Lens of Rasmus Hjortshøj

09:30 - 10 August, 2017
© Rasmus Hjortshøj
© Rasmus Hjortshøj

In this series of images, photographer Rasmus Hjortshøj has captured the Kolumba Museum by renowned architect Peter Zumthor in Cologne, Germany. The museum, constructed atop the ruins of a Gothic church destroyed during World War II, was a response to a competition that aimed to protect the remains of the Gothic work and create a space to house the art collection of the archbishopric of Cologne. In his winning design, Zumthor fused the existing ruins with modern architecture ideal for religious art in an elegant and minimalist way.

With his photographs, Rasmus Hjortshøj offers a tour of Zumthor's design, portraying the building within its urban context, while examining the architect's dedication to detail.

© Rasmus Hjortshøj © Rasmus Hjortshøj © Rasmus Hjortshøj © Rasmus Hjortshøj +29

The Krane / Arcgency

05:00 - 2 August, 2017
The Krane / Arcgency, © Rasmus Hjortshøj
© Rasmus Hjortshøj

© Rasmus Hjortshøj © Rasmus Hjortshøj © Rasmus Hjortshøj © Rasmus Hjortshøj +60

  • Architects

  • Location

    Skudehavnsvej 1, 2150 Nordhavn,Copenhagen, Denmark
  • Area

    285.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2017
  • Photographs

TIRPITZ / BIG

03:00 - 18 July, 2017
TIRPITZ / BIG, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

© Rasmus Hjortshøj © Rasmus Hjortshøj © Mike Bink © Frederik Lyng +35

Our Favorite Nordic Photographers: The Best Photos of The Week

08:00 - 2 July, 2017

Often informed by its harsh climate and stunning landscapes, Nordic design, specifically architecture, has a unique relationship with nature. Photographers of Nordic architecture have benefitted from studying this close connection in their photos that experiment with capturing light, innovative materials, and landscape to create a compelling composition. Below is a selection of images of both public and private architecture by prominent photographers such as Pasi Aalto, Bert Leandersson, Mika Huisman and Åke E: Lindman.

© Åke E:son Lindman © Pasi Aalto © Åke E:son Lindman © Rasmus Hjortshøj +8

The Silo / COBE

11:00 - 29 June, 2017
The Silo / COBE, © Rasmus Hjortshøj
© Rasmus Hjortshøj

© Rasmus Hjortshøj © Rasmus Hjortshøj © Rasmus Hjortshøj © Rasmus Hjortshøj +35

  • Architects

  • Location

    Copenhagen, Denmark
  • Area

    10000.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2017
  • Photographs

18 Cool Examples of Architecture for Kids

06:00 - 19 April, 2017

Designing for kids is certainly not child’s play. Whilst the design process is undertaken by adults, the end users are often children, such is the case in kindergarten, schools, and parks. Architects have a responsibility, therefore, to ensure that the built environment offers children the chance to play, explore, and learn in physical space, even in a digital age. With that in mind, here are 18 cool spaces designed especially for children – environments which may perhaps inspire the Fosters, Hadids, and Le Corbusiers of tomorrow.

"Wasteland" Provides a Tactile Insight into the World of Upcycling in Architecture

09:30 - 6 April, 2017
© Rasmus Hjortshøj
© Rasmus Hjortshøj

A thorough architectural response towards the growing problems of population, climate, and urban migration is currently on display at the Danish Architecture Centre in Copenhagen, in the form of the upcycled Wasteland exhibition. Curated by Danish architecture firm Lendager Group, the exhibits shown in Wasteland are filled with raw materials, processes, experiments and methods, backed up with a long list of shocking facts about our effects on planet Earth: over 2 million tons of CO2 have been emitted globally this year; over 3.3 billion tons of resources have been extracted from the earth globally this year; over 127 million tons of waste have been dumped globally this year—all totalling a cost of over $14 trillion USD resulting from our failure to act on climate change. These are the live statistics (as shown at the time of ArchDaily’s visit last Friday) which confront visitors in the first room of the exhibition space. They provide context for what is to follow.

© Rasmus Hjortshøj © Rasmus Hjortshøj © Rasmus Hjortshøj © Rasmus Hjortshøj +39

The 16 Stories Behind the 2017 Building of the Year Award Winners

09:30 - 16 February, 2017
The 16 Stories Behind the 2017 Building of the Year Award Winners

After two weeks of nominations and voting, last week we announced the 16 winners of the 2017 Building of the Year Awards. In addition to providing inspiration, information, and tools for architecture lovers from around the world, ArchDaily seeks to offer a platform for the many diverse and global voices in the architecture community. In this year's Building of the Year Awards that range of voices was once again on display, with 75,000 voters from around the world offering their selections to ultimately select 16 winners from over 3,000 published projects.

Behind each of those projects are years of research, design, and labor. In the spirit of the world's most democratic architecture award, we share the stories behind the 16 buildings that won over our global readership with their urban interventions, humanitarianism, playfulness, and grandeur.

1200 Intrepid / Bjarke Ingels Group

09:00 - 10 November, 2016
© Rasmus Hjortshoj
© Rasmus Hjortshoj

© Rasmus Hjortshoj Courtesy of Bjarke Ingels Group © Rasmus Hjortshoj Courtesy of Bjarke Ingels Group +16

  • Architects

  • Location

    4747 S Broad St, Philadelphia, PA 19112, United States
  • Partners In Charge

    Bjarke Ingels, Thomas Christoffersen, Beat Schenk
  • Project Leaders

    ören Grünert (Concept), David Brown (Schematic & DD), Brandon Cook (CD), Michelle Stromsta (CA)
  • Team

    Annette Miller, Aran Coakley, Armen Menendian, Douglass Alligood, Natalie Kwee, Peter Lee, Taylor Hewett, Terry Lallak, Thomas Fagan, Thea Sofie Gassenholm
  • Area

    9250.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2015

BIG's First Office Building Design Opens at the Philadelphia Navy Yard

14:00 - 2 November, 2016
BIG's First Office Building Design Opens at the Philadelphia Navy Yard, © Rasmus Hjortshoj
© Rasmus Hjortshoj

BIG has completed their second building on U.S. soil, a 92,000-square-foot office building at 1200 Intrepid Avenue in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania that also marks the firm’s first realized office building design. Located within the revitalized Philadelphia Navy Yard master plan (designed by Robert Stern), the four-story building features a bowing, double-curved facade and a supersized “periscope” inspired by the historic battleships docked a few blocks away.

© Rasmus Hjortshoj © Rasmus Hjortshoj © Rasmus Hjortshoj © Rasmus Hjortshoj +11

Spotlight: Bjarke Ingels

08:00 - 2 October, 2016
Spotlight: Bjarke Ingels, © Iwan Baan
© Iwan Baan

Danish architect Bjarke Ingels (born 2 October 1974) is often cited as one of the most inspirational architects of our time. At an age when many architects are just beginning to establish themselves in professional practice, Ingels has already won numerous competitions and achieved a level of critical acclaim (and fame) that is rare for new names in the industry. His work embodies a rare optimism that is simultaneously playful, practical, and immediately accessible.

Museum of Rock / MVRDV + COBE

02:00 - 29 April, 2016
Museum of Rock / MVRDV + COBE, © Ossip van Duivenbode
© Ossip van Duivenbode

© Ossip van Duivenbode © Ossip van Duivenbode © Rasmus Hjortshõj © Rasmus Hjortshõj +44

Frederiksvej Kindergarten / COBE

03:00 - 9 February, 2016
Frederiksvej Kindergarten / COBE, © Rasmus Hjortshøj
© Rasmus Hjortshøj

© Rasmus Hjortshøj © Rasmus Hjortshøj © Adam Mørk © Adam Mørk +21

ArchDaily Readers Tell Us Who Should Win the 2016 Pritzker Prize

09:30 - 8 January, 2016
ArchDaily Readers Tell Us Who Should Win the 2016 Pritzker Prize

For over 30 years, the Pritzker Prize has awarded some of the most inspirational and accomplished architects on the planet, and it has long helped to shape public discussion about current trends and ideas in architecture. Recent years have been no exception; in 2014, for example, the jury's citation of Shigeru Ban's humanitarian work sparked a heated discussion about the social duties of architects.

However, just as the selection by the Pritzker jury can shape public debate, it is also influenced by public opinion. So with the announcement of the 2016 Pritzker Prize winner due on Wednesday, last month we asked our readers to give us an insight into which architects they feel should be in the running. Through a poll and the comments on the post, they let us know who they think is deserving of architecture's biggest prize.

The Business of Design Success: How did BIG Get So... Big?

09:30 - 11 November, 2015
The Business of Design Success: How did BIG Get So... Big?, Danish Pavilion at the 2010 Shanghai Expo. Image © Iwan Baan
Danish Pavilion at the 2010 Shanghai Expo. Image © Iwan Baan

In recent years, the ever-increasing profile of Bjarke Ingels and his firm BIG have been hard to miss. For an office that is barely 10 years old, the number and scope of their projects is astonishing; to cope with demand, the firm has grown to employ almost 300 people. This growth, though, did not happen by accident. In this article, originally published on DesignIntelligence as "The Secret to BIG Success," Bob Fisher speaks to the firm's CEO and Partner Sheela Maini Søgaard in order to uncover the business plan behind the BIG phenomenon.

BIG may be the most appropriately named firm on the planet.

The Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) seems to have an outsized impact in all it does. The Copenhagen-based design firm turns conventions and assumptions upside down and combines contrasting possibilities in outrageously bold, imaginative and playful ways. Projects like Via at West 57th Street in New York City and the Amager Bakke Waste-to-Energy Plant in Copenhagen are prime examples: the first a pyramid-shaped apartment building that defies the forest of rectangular towers around it, and the second a power plant that doubles as a smoke ring-blowing ski slope.

The world has taken note. Whether in praise or criticism, the architectural, cultural and business media tend to strike a heroic tone when describing the firm’s work: radical, ambitious, bold, confident. In short…BIG.

Danish National Maritime Museum, Helsingør. Image © Rasmus Hjortshøj Gammel Hellerup Gymnasium, Hellerup. Image © Jens Lindhe 8 House, Copenhagen. Image © Dragor Luftfoto Two World Trade Center in New York. Image © DBOX, Courtesy of BIG +9

DDS Søndermarken / Sophus Søbye Architects

02:00 - 11 September, 2015
DDS Søndermarken / Sophus Søbye Architects, © Jens Larsen
© Jens Larsen

© Rasmus Hjortshøj © Rasmus Hjortshøj © Jens Larsen © Jens Larsen +31

  • Architects

  • Location

    Bag Søndermarken, 2500 København, Denmark
  • Project Team

    Sophus Søbye, David Vega y Rojo, Martin Freeman, Maria del Mar Freire Morales
  • Project Year

    2015
  • Photographs