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Recycling: The Latest Architecture and News

Winners Announced for a School Made from Recycled Plastic in Mexico

06:00 - 14 September, 2019
Winners Announced for a School Made from Recycled Plastic in Mexico, 1st PLACE. Image © Daniel Garcia, William Smith
1st PLACE. Image © Daniel Garcia, William Smith

Archstorming, an architectural platform that organizes international competitions, has released the results for the Tulum Plastic School contest. In fact, participants were challenged to design a school made of recycled plastic, tackling the current issue of pollution in Mexico.

21 Projects Where Kengo Kuma (Re)Uses Materials in Unusual Ways

04:00 - 30 May, 2019
21 Projects Where Kengo Kuma (Re)Uses Materials in Unusual Ways, Mont-Blanc Base Camp / Kengo Kuma & Associates. Image Courtesy of Kengo Kuma and Associates
Mont-Blanc Base Camp / Kengo Kuma & Associates. Image Courtesy of Kengo Kuma and Associates

Kengo Kuma uses materials to connect with the local context and the users of his projects. The textures and elementary forms of constructive systems, materials, and products, are exhibited and used in favor of the architectural concept, giving value to the functions that will be carried out in each building.

From showcases made with ceramic tiles to the sifted light created by expanded metal panels, passing through an ethereal polyester coating, Kuma understands the material as an essential component that can make a difference in architecture from the design stages. Next, we present 21 projects where Kengo Kuma masterfully uses construction materials.

V&A Dundee / Kengo Kuma and Associates. Image © Hufton+Crow Camper Paseo de Gracia / Kengo Kuma & Associates. Image © ImagenSubliminal GC Prostho Museum Research Center / Kengo Kuma & Associates. Image © Daici Ano Archives Antoni Clavé / Kengo Kuma & Associates. Image © 11h45 + 44

How To Recycle Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) To Turn it Into Paint

05:00 - 14 March, 2019
How To Recycle Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) To Turn it Into Paint, Cortesía de Idea-Tec
Cortesía de Idea-Tec

Expanded polystyrene (EPS) is a plastic material widely used for thermal insulation (and in some cases, acoustics) in building envelopes.

So is it possible to recycle it and apply it again in other construction processes? Yes, EPS can be crushed and compacted to be used in the manufacture of new plastic products. But it can also be recycled and live again in the construction of architectural and urban projects in the form of paints and coatings.

Cortesía de Idea-Tec Cortesía de Idea-Tec Cortesía de Idea-Tec Cortesía de Idea-Tec + 10

The Trends that Will Influence Architecture in 2019

08:30 - 4 February, 2019
The Trends that Will Influence Architecture in 2019, © Alberto Cosi. ImageBamboo Sports Hall for Panyaden International School / Chiangmai Life Construction
© Alberto Cosi. ImageBamboo Sports Hall for Panyaden International School / Chiangmai Life Construction

It is, once again, the time of year where we look towards the future to define the goals and approaches that we will take for our careers throughout the upcoming year. To help the millions of architects who visit ArchDaily every day from all over the world, we compiled a list of the most popular ideas of 2018, which will continue to be developed and consolidated throughout 2019.

Over 130 million users discovered new references, materials, and tools in 2018 alone, infusing their practice of architecture with the means to improve the quality of life for our cities and built spaces. As users demonstrated certain affinities and/or demonstrated greater interest in particular topics, these emerged as trends. 

How to Make a Facade with Recycled Materials: 16 Notable Examples

12:00 - 30 September, 2018
How to Make a Facade with Recycled Materials: 16 Notable Examples, © Lukas Pelech
© Lukas Pelech

Cortesía de MAP Cortesía de Project.DWG + LOOS.FM Cortesía de Wang Shu, Amateur Architecture Studio © Quang Tran + 33

With the aim of supporting architects to become active agents of sustainable design, this week we present a selection of facades that incorporate different recycled materials. Beyond the typical uses of plastic and glass, in this article, you will find innovative materials such as mattress springs, ice cream containers, plastic chairs, and recycled waste from agricultural and industrial products. A look at 16 remarkable projects using recycled materials to create an attractive facade.

6 Tips for Designing and Building a Tiny House

08:30 - 2 April, 2018
6 Tips for Designing and Building a Tiny House, <a href='https://www.archdaily.com/420623/portable-house-aph80-abaton-arquitectura'>Portable House ÁPH80 / Ábaton Arquitectura</a>. Image © Juan Baraja
Portable House ÁPH80 / Ábaton Arquitectura. Image © Juan Baraja

Tiny houses have become popular in recent years as housing prices continue to soar. Whether as an off-the-grid retreat or a way to live more simply and economically, tiny homes offer a more flexible way to live. They are even being used by charity organizations such as the Tiny Homes Foundation in Australia as a way to tackle the issue of homelessness in cities and the need for social housing. As the popularity and need for tiny homes become ever more prevalent, knowing the necessary skills to design a tiny house for yourself or a client is a useful skill to have.

Below are 6 tips to keep in mind when designing and building a tiny house:

<a href='https://www.archdaily.com/790996/koda-kodasema'>KODA / Kodasema</a>. Image © Paul Kuimet <a href='https://www.archdaily.com/476916/minimod-mapa'>Minimod / MAPA</a>. Image © Leonardo Finotti <a href='https://www.archdaily.com/379927/micro-house-studio-liu-lubin'>Micro-house / Studio Liu Lubin</a>. Image Courtesy of Studio Liu Lubin <a href='https://www.archdaily.com/420623/portable-house-aph80-abaton-arquitectura'>Portable House ÁPH80 / Ábaton Arquitectura</a>. Image © Juan Baraja + 10

Latin America's First Earthship is a Sustainable School Built from Found Materials

16:00 - 18 March, 2018
Latin America's First Earthship is a Sustainable School Built from Found Materials, via Earthship Biotecture / Tagma
via Earthship Biotecture / Tagma

Seeking to combine traditional education with the responsible use of resources and the development of sustainable human relations, the first sustainable public school in Latin America was created. Designed under a constructive method developed by the North American architect Michael Reynolds, who has now built such schools around the world.

The 270 square meters building is on the coastal portion of Jaureguiberry, Canelones and was raised in only seven weeks. Its construction is made up of approximately 60% recycled materials (covered with plastic and glass bottles, cans, cardboard) and 40% of traditional materials.

via Earthship Biotecture / Tagma via Earthship Biotecture / Tagma via Earthship Biotecture / Tagma via Earthship Biotecture / Tagma + 19

Michael Reynolds to Build Sustainable Public School in Argentina

16:00 - 17 February, 2018
Michael Reynolds to Build Sustainable Public School in Argentina, The sustainable school built by Michael Reynolds in Uruguay. Image via Earthship Biotecture / Tagma
The sustainable school built by Michael Reynolds in Uruguay. Image via Earthship Biotecture / Tagma

After a successful project in Uruguay—the first in Latin America—it's now Argentina's turn to build its first sustainable public school. The design will use the recycled materials of "garbage warrior" Michael Reynolds, the founder of Earthship Biotecture, and will be constructed as part of the program "A Sustainable School" in the unique biosphere of Mar Chiquita, in the Province of Buenos Aires, from March 1 to 28.

Read on for more information about the new project.

A "Hairy" Facade Conceals a Beautiful, Calm and Serene Workspace Dedicated to Focus

16:00 - 7 January, 2018
A "Hairy" Facade Conceals a Beautiful, Calm and Serene Workspace Dedicated to Focus, © Thibaut Devulder
© Thibaut Devulder

“Hairy” isn’t typically a term used to describe architecture. However, a “hairy” exterior is perhaps the defining characteristic of this micro-office by 2hD Architecture Workshop in the UK—the outer facades are entirely clad in natural coco-fiber broom heads.

The details and junctions of the broom heads are largely concealed as to let the broom bristles interlock, providing a continuous and visually diffuse surface. This hides any clue as to what is occurring on the interior—the structure existing merely as an object of intrigue.

© Tom Hughes © Thibaut Devulder © Thibaut Devulder Plan + 23

Housing Construction in Argentina Uses Recycled PET Bricks

14:00 - 17 December, 2017
Housing Construction in Argentina Uses Recycled PET Bricks, Cortesía de Fundación Ecoinclusión
Cortesía de Fundación Ecoinclusión

The Fundación EcoInclusión - winner of the first prize in the regional competition Google.org Challenge - is an Argentine non-profit organization that was born in 2015, from the hands of a group of young people that promote the construction of a fairer, equitable and sustainable society.

Located in the Alta Gracia city, province of Córdoba, Ecoinclusión works in the reduction of PET bottles waste with the production of bricks made of plastic residues destined to the construction in vulnerable sectors, with the aim of generating environmental and social impact and cultural participation in the communities.

This House was Built in 5 Days Using Recycled Plastic Bricks

06:00 - 1 May, 2017
Construction of house made of recycled plastic bricks.. Image Courtesy of Conceptos Plásticos
Construction of house made of recycled plastic bricks.. Image Courtesy of Conceptos Plásticos

Ten years ago when Colombian Fernando Llanos tried to build his own house in Cundinamarca, he realized that moving the materials from Bogota was going to be very difficult. After mulling it over, he decided to build his house out of plastic, and after a series of trials and errors, he ended up meeting architect Óscar Méndez, who developed his thesis on the same subject, and together they founded the company Conceptos Plásticos (Plastic Concepts) in 2011. 

The innovative local company managed to patent its system of bricks and pillars made of recycled plastic, which is then put together like Lego pieces in a construction system that lets you build houses up to two stories high in five days.

Temporary shelter in Guapi (Colombia) for 42 families displaced by armed conflict.. Image Courtesy of Conceptos Plásticos Temporary shelter in Guapi (Colombia) for 42 families displaced by armed conflict.. Image Courtesy of Conceptos Plásticos Temporary shelter in Guapi (Colombia) for 42 families displaced by armed conflict.. Image Courtesy of Conceptos Plásticos Temporary shelter in Guapi (Colombia) for 42 families displaced by armed conflict.. Image Courtesy of Conceptos Plásticos + 16

Pavilion Made from Aluminum Cans and Cracked Clay Wins 2017 City of Dreams Competition

08:00 - 23 March, 2017
Pavilion Made from Aluminum Cans and Cracked Clay Wins 2017 City of Dreams Competition, Courtesy of Team Aesop (Josh Draper, Lisa Ramsburg, Powell Draper, Edward M. Segal, and Max Dowd)
Courtesy of Team Aesop (Josh Draper, Lisa Ramsburg, Powell Draper, Edward M. Segal, and Max Dowd)

Cast & Place has been announced as the winner of the 2017 City of Dreams competition to create a pavilion for New York City’s Governors Island. Held by not-for-profit arts organization FIGMENT, the AIANY Emerging New York Architects Committee, and the Structural Engineers Association of New York, the competition called for a design to be the hub of FIGMENT’s free community arts festival during Summer 2017, based on questions of the future of New York, how design can confront environmental challenges, and how architecture can be built from recycled or borrowed material.

With these questions in mind, Cast & Place was conceptualized as a pavilion made entirely from waste. 300,000 recycled aluminum cans, cast into the cracks of dried clay, will form structural panels that assemble into shaded spaces for performance and play.

Courtesy of Team Aesop (Josh Draper, Lisa Ramsburg, Powell Draper, Edward M. Segal, and Max Dowd) Courtesy of Team Aesop (Josh Draper, Lisa Ramsburg, Powell Draper, Edward M. Segal, and Max Dowd) Courtesy of Team Aesop (Josh Draper, Lisa Ramsburg, Powell Draper, Edward M. Segal, and Max Dowd) Courtesy of Team Aesop (Josh Draper, Lisa Ramsburg, Powell Draper, Edward M. Segal, and Max Dowd) + 9

Humanity and Art Entwined - How NADAAA's Exhibit Became Blankets for Syrian Refugees

08:00 - 10 February, 2017
Humanity and Art Entwined - How NADAAA's Exhibit Became Blankets for Syrian Refugees, The exhibit was hung from the roof of the Electric Hanger exhibition hall. Image © Roland Halbe
The exhibit was hung from the roof of the Electric Hanger exhibition hall. Image © Roland Halbe

Jordanian artist Raya Kassisieh, with the support of American firm NADAAA, has repurposed her exhibit from the Amman Design Week in Jordan to create blankets for Syrian refugees and Jordanian families. The Entrelac exhibit, created by Kassisieh and NADAAA, consists of 300kg of hand-knit, un-dyed wool which was later cut and stitched to create blankets for those fleeing the Syrian Civil War, now approaching its sixth year.

The exhibit was displayed at the Amman Design Festival in September 2016. Image © Roland Halbe The exhibit was stitched into blankets to aid Syrian refugees. Image Courtesy of Amman Design Week The exhibit was stitched into blankets to aid Syrian refugees. Image Courtesy of Amman Design Week The exhibit is made of hand-knit, un-dyed wool. Image Courtesy of Amman Design Week + 11

The Avant-Garde of Adaptive Reuse: How Design For Deconstruction is Reinventing Recycling

10:30 - 16 January, 2016
The Avant-Garde of Adaptive Reuse: How Design For Deconstruction is Reinventing Recycling, The NASA Sustainability Base, designed by William McDonough + Partners with AECOM was constructed based on Design for Deconstruction principles. Image © William McDonough + Partners
The NASA Sustainability Base, designed by William McDonough + Partners with AECOM was constructed based on Design for Deconstruction principles. Image © William McDonough + Partners

As an idea that was developed fairly early on in the movement for sustainability, and picked up significant traction a few years into the new millennium, "Design for Deconstruction" has been around for some years. Yet still, considered on the scale of building lifespans, the idea is still in its infancy, with few opportunities to test its principles. In this post originally published on Autodesk's Redshift publication as "Recycled Buildings or Bridges? Designing for Deconstruction Beyond Adaptive Reuse," Timothy A Schuler looks at the advances that have been made, and the challenges that still face, the design for deconstruction movement.

This summer, the Oakland Museum of California announced a new public arts grant program. Except instead of money, selected artists would receive steel. Tons of it.

The Bay Bridge Steel Program emerged out of a desire to salvage and repurpose the metal that once made up the eastern span of San Francisco’s Bay Bridge, originally constructed in 1933 (it was replaced in 2013). The steel in question, sourced from “spans referred to as ‘504s’ and ‘288s’ (in reference to their length in feet),” according to the application material, would be available for civic and public art projects within the state of California.

The program represents a unique opportunity to adaptively reuse infrastructure, upcycling what might have been waste. And yet any instance of adaptive reuse is inherently reactive because the design process is dictated by an existing condition.

San Francisco’s Bay Bridge being dismantled for use in the Bay Bridge Steel Program. Image © Sam Burbank San Francisco’s Bay Bridge being dismantled for use in the Bay Bridge Steel Program. Image © Sam Burbank San Francisco’s Bay Bridge being dismantled for use in the Bay Bridge Steel Program. Image © Sam Burbank San Francisco’s Bay Bridge being dismantled for use in the Bay Bridge Steel Program. Image © Sam Burbank + 9

Recycling In Practice: Perkins + Will Finds New Life for Cardboard Tubes

00:00 - 24 December, 2014
Recycling In Practice: Perkins + Will Finds New Life for Cardboard Tubes,  Phase one view of the 'tube wall'. Image Courtesy of Perkins + Will
Phase one view of the 'tube wall'. Image Courtesy of Perkins + Will

In architectural offices, the cardboard tubes used in large-format rolls of paper seem to multiply at an alarming rate, populating every nook and cranny until they fill the rafters. The team at Perkins + Will Boston have invented a cheeky solution to stem cardboard tube proliferation in the form of a privacy screen that behaves simultaneously as a sound and visual barrier, and as a storage space. Composed of dozens of reclaimed cardboard tubes fitted into a CAD-mapped and cut plywood frame, the 'wall' provides ample opportunities for drawing storage, sunlight mitigation, and playful interaction without disrupting workflow.

Find out more about Perkins + Will's solution to cardboard tube waste after the break

Courtesy of Perkins + Will  Implementation plan . Image Courtesy of Perkins + Will Courtesy of Perkins + Will  Phase one installed. Image Courtesy of Perkins + Will + 13

Infographic: Which Cities Are Embracing the Green Revolution

00:00 - 26 May, 2013
Infographic: Which Cities Are Embracing the Green Revolution , via House Trip
via House Trip

Which cities are embracing the green revolution? This infographic compares the efforts of six leading cities - New York, Vancouver, Copenhagen, London, Amsterdam and Stockholm - in the race to drastically reduce global C02 emissions. Based predominantly on 2009 statistics, Stockholm seems to be leading the way in carbon reduction. Continue reading after the break to see who claims the blue ribbon for renewable energy, efficient water consumption and rigorous recycling.