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Reuse: The Latest Architecture and News

Sustainable Office Furniture: Promoting Circular Design in the Workplace

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Interior architects and designers have often claimed that a well-designed office space will translate into greater productivity, creativity and worker satisfaction –yet the impact is greater than most tend to imagine. Recent studies suggest that good design positively impacts company culture, fosters a sense of community and creates a healthy, happy and motivating environment. In fact, it directly influences the recruitment and retention of talent: “workplace design significantly increases the attractiveness of employers to potential candidates.” Proper lighting, a flexible layout and biophilic features are all important factors to consider during the planning stage. But to fully address user comfort and well-being, these must be combined with excellent furniture design. After all, integrating high-quality ergonomic pieces is a simple way to boost mood and enhance functionality and aesthetics when creating or redecorating the workspace.

Renovations: Where to Start?

With the scarcity of open spaces, the high concentration of empty buildings in areas already consolidated in cities, and an awareness of the impact of new constructions on the environment, refurbishments are increasingly part of both the architect's work routine and the client's choice. At the same time, they are often synonymous with unexpected surprises and problems, causing delays and discomfort. This text presents four pre-work strategies that can help you better prepare for this moment.

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The Future of American Design Is Reinvention, Reuse, and Renewal

Reinvention is one of the founding myths of the United States of America. For those lucky enough to come here on the decks of ships rather than chained in the hold, this country offered a chance to be someone else, somewhere else. For them and generations of immigrants who followed, America seemed to put a safe distance between their pasts and a boundless future.

But the illusion was eventually flipped on its head. Around the turn of the millennium, reinvention was a prevailing theme for movie characters intent on getting out of small-town America; in architecture, that sentiment took the form of building dream cities anywhere but here. In Dubai and Shanghai our brightest design minds conjured up hermetically sealed towers, malls, and museums largely disconnected from history, community, and climate.

HA-HA Designs Modular-Timber System to Create Affordable Housing in Rotterdam

HA-HA, in partnership with BIK Bouw and Wooncompas Housing, will develop four social housing blocks for the community of Ridderkerk, near Rotterdam, Netherlands. The project uses materials from the existing social housing estate, built in the 1950s, and employs an innovative modular-timber system to create sustainable human-centered housing. The old buildings are planned to be disassembled and their components reused and integrated into the new development, which will increase the number of affordable units by 13%.

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Renovation of a Milan Laboratory to a Family Loft / Tomoarchitects

Renovation of a Milan Laboratory to a Family Loft / Tomoarchitects - Interior Photography, Apartment Interiors, Bedroom, Beam, Arch, BedRenovation of a Milan Laboratory to a Family Loft / Tomoarchitects - Interior Photography, Apartment Interiors, Beam, Arch, Chair, Lighting, Table, BenchRenovation of a Milan Laboratory to a Family Loft / Tomoarchitects - Interior Photography, Apartment Interiors, Beam, Door, Arch, Lighting, Table, Chair, BenchRenovation of a Milan Laboratory to a Family Loft / Tomoarchitects - Exterior Photography, Apartment InteriorsRenovation of a Milan Laboratory to a Family Loft / Tomoarchitects - More Images+ 22

  • Architects: Tomoarchitects
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area :  300
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2016
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers :  Caleido Ceasar, DGA Mirium, Devon & Devon, Enrico Cassina
  • Professionals : Molteni Carlo & C snc

5 Regenerative Strategies to Activate the Dead Edges in our Cities Post-Pandemic

As the city continues to evolve and transform, dead edges in the cityscape begin to emerge, subsequently reducing the level of activity in our built environment. These 'dead edges' refer to the areas that lack active engagement, they remain empty and deprived of people, since they no longer present themselves as useful or appealing. As the Covid-19 pandemic draws to an ultimate close, the first issue we may face post-pandemic is to revive our urban environment. A kiss of life into a tired and outdated cityscape...

The focal element in creating an active and healthy urban environment is by increasing vitality through placemaking. Creating diverse and interesting places to reside, thrive, and work. Here are five regenerative strategies that animate the cityscape and ultimately produce resilient, attractive, and flexible environments.

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The Undecided Place / T4 design

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  • Architects: T4 design
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area :  90
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2022
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers :  Mulia

1300 Recycling Pavilion / Hyunje Joo

1300 Recycling Pavilion / Hyunje Joo - Exterior Photography, Temporary Installations, Facade1300 Recycling Pavilion / Hyunje Joo - Interior Photography, Temporary Installations1300 Recycling Pavilion / Hyunje Joo - Drawings, Temporary Installations1300 Recycling Pavilion / Hyunje Joo - Exterior Photography, Temporary Installations, Facade1300 Recycling Pavilion / Hyunje Joo - More Images+ 9

  • Architects: Hyunje Joo
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area :  60
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2021

Spacelab's Experimental Shelter is Energy Self-Sufficient and Designed for Disassembly

Spacelab's Experimental Shelter is Energy Self-Sufficient and Designed for Disassembly - Featured Image
Courtesy of Spacelab

Italian architecture practice Spacelab designed an energy self-sufficient shelter for temporary use, a parametric project that can be built without foundations on any site, leaving no trace and no damage to the site at the end of its life cycle. Named Zero in reference to the lack of waste during construction or removal and its zero-emissions operation, the structure can be demounted and reassembled multiple times, tapping into issues of circular economy, impermanence and reuse.

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Why “Use Is the Best Form of Preservation”

This article was originally published on Common Edge.

"For more than a generation, federally funded historic tax credits (HTCs) have been instrumental in incentivizing developers to revive and reuse historic buildings and keep them economically viable, rather than replace them with shiny new objects. These credits create jobs, promote responsible development, and leverage billions in private investment to enable income-generating buildings". Read the interview between Justin R. Wolf and Meghan Elliott, founding principal of New History, a firm specializing in adaptive reuse.

The Japanese Pavilion at the 2021 Venice Biennale Addresses Mass Consumption and Reusability

For this year's edition of the Venice Biennale, the Japan Pavilion invites visitors to reflect on the movement of goods fuelling mass consumption and rethink sustainability and reuse in architecture. Titled Co-ownership of Action: Trajectories of Elements, the project curated by Kadowaki Kozo involves dismantling an old wooden Japanese house and transporting it to Venice to be reconstructed in a new configuration with the addition of modern materials. The exhibition exemplifies how old materials could be given an entirely new existence by putting the current movement of goods in the service of reuse rather than consumption.

Reduce, Reuse and Recycle: the Three R's Rule Applied to Architecture

As levels of pollutant emissions have increased over the years, awareness has also grown regarding actions that can be taken to minimize the damage caused to the planet. As a way to promote waste reduction or prevention, the 3 R's rule is created: reduce, reuse and recycle. These actions, together with sustainable consumption standards, have been promoted as a means to protect natural resources and minimize waste.

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Low-Cost Design: Urban Installations and Pavilions Built with Recycled Pallets

Commonly used as storage support for products in supermarket stocks and fairs, pallets are versatile. After their primary function has been discarded, the reuse of pallets for other purposes is increasingly common, collaborating to the reduction of the amount of waste discarded, especially as raw material for the creation of furniture and decks. However, going beyond the commonly highlighted  DIY furniture tutorials on youtube, these structures are gaining ground as the main element in the construction of ephemeral architecture, such as small pavilions and urban installations. In fact, these small pieces can be stacked and united together in different ways and patterns.