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recycled materials: The Latest Architecture and News

CNAD National Art, Crafts and Design Center / Ramos Castellano Arquitectos

CNAD National Art, Crafts and Design Center / Ramos Castellano Arquitectos - Exterior Photography, Public Architecture, Facade, DoorCNAD National Art, Crafts and Design Center / Ramos Castellano Arquitectos - Public ArchitectureCNAD National Art, Crafts and Design Center / Ramos Castellano Arquitectos - Interior Photography, Public Architecture, Table, ChairCNAD National Art, Crafts and Design Center / Ramos Castellano Arquitectos - Interior Photography, Public Architecture, Handrail, ChairCNAD National Art, Crafts and Design Center / Ramos Castellano Arquitectos - More Images+ 49

Brazilian Houses: 10 Residences Using Recycled Materials

According to a survey by the Brazilian Association for Recycling of Construction and Demolition Waste (ABRECON), there has been an increase in the recycling of construction and demolition waste (C&D) in Brazil in recent years. According to the 2015 report, 21% of the total C&D was recycled in the country that year, while in 2013 the rate was 19%.

The outlook is promising but not yet ideal, and the growth of recycled C&D materials is still considered small. In Brazil, construction waste can represent between 50% and 70% of the total municipal solid waste. This means, we still need to advocate for a more common practice of material recycling and reuse in architecture, especially in Brazil.

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Environmentally Friendly Materials: 8 New Products To Reduce Carbon Emission

The construction industry's future will undoubtedly include "carbon reduction" as a mandatory task. Aside from locally sourced, virgin materials, an increasing number of new materials are becoming available. New materials can be developed in several ways, including low-carbon substitution, recycling, performance enhancement, and 3D printing. New materials will not only be more environmentally friendly and enable new construction methods, but they will also influence the starting point and direction of design concepts, resulting in new buildings with new perceptions and spaces.

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Architekturwoche Basel Reveals the Design of Inaugural Basel Pavilion Made of Recycled Building Components

The new biennial event Architekturwoche Basel (AWB) will debut this May as a platform for discussing architecture and urban development through the lens of sustainable construction and the circular economy. The inaugural edition also marks the launch of the first Basel Pavilion, a temporary structure meant to showcase new possibilities for environmentally-friendly building practices. The winning design, “Loggia Basileana”, created by architecture practice isla, is made of reused building components and features a series of modules that form a continuous pedestrian passageway along the train tracks on the Dreispitz site.

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Concrete Recycling Is Already a Reality

Concrete Recycling Is Already a Reality - Featured Image
Cortesia de Sika

Much has been said about circularity in the construction industry. Inspired by nature, the circular economy works in a continuous process of production, resorption and recycling, self-managing and naturally regulating itself, where waste can turn into supplies for the production of new products. It is a very interesting concept, but it faces some practical difficulties in everyday life, whether in the demolition / disassembly process, or in the correct disposal of materials and waste; but mostly due to the lack of technologies available to recycle or give new use to construction materials. About 40% of all waste generated on Planet Earth comes from civil construction, and a good part of it could be recycled. Concrete is an especially important material because of its large carbon footprint in production, its ubiquity and massive use, and also because of the difficulty of recycling or reusing it.

The Architectural Association's EmTech and Hassel Design Pavilion Using Reclaimed Timber

The Architectural Association's EmTech and Hassel Design Pavilion Using Reclaimed Timber - Featured Image
© Studio NAARO

In collaboration with architecture practice Hassell, Architectural Association's Association's Emergent Technologies and Design (EmTech) programme created a reclaimed wood pavilion, exploring the convergence of computational design, new construction technologies, and material reuse. Titled Re-Emerge, the project addresses the issue of limited material resources, exploring the architectural potential of material recycling in the context of generative design.

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Contemplation House / Virginia Kerridge Architect

Contemplation House / Virginia Kerridge Architect - Exterior Photography, Residential Interiors, Garden, Facade, DoorContemplation House / Virginia Kerridge Architect - Interior Photography, Residential Interiors, Deck, Facade, Beam, Door, TableContemplation House / Virginia Kerridge Architect - Interior Photography, Residential Interiors, Kitchen, Beam, Table, Countertop, ChairContemplation House / Virginia Kerridge Architect - Interior Photography, Residential Interiors, Bathroom, Door, Facade, Balcony, Bathtub, Table, ToiletContemplation House / Virginia Kerridge Architect - More Images+ 19

Escarpment House / Virginia Kerridge Architect

Escarpment House / Virginia Kerridge Architect - Exterior Photography, Houses, Garden, FacadeEscarpment House / Virginia Kerridge Architect - Interior Photography, Houses, Beam, Facade, Table, Lighting, ChairEscarpment House / Virginia Kerridge Architect - Interior Photography, Houses, Beam, Fence, Facade, Balcony, Table, ChairEscarpment House / Virginia Kerridge Architect - Exterior Photography, Houses, Deck, Facade, ChairEscarpment House / Virginia Kerridge Architect - More Images+ 17

Brogers Creek, Australia

The Japanese Pavilion at the 2021 Venice Biennale Addresses Mass Consumption and Reusability

For this year's edition of the Venice Biennale, the Japan Pavilion invites visitors to reflect on the movement of goods fuelling mass consumption and rethink sustainability and reuse in architecture. Titled Co-ownership of Action: Trajectories of Elements, the project curated by Kadowaki Kozo involves dismantling an old wooden Japanese house and transporting it to Venice to be reconstructed in a new configuration with the addition of modern materials. The exhibition exemplifies how old materials could be given an entirely new existence by putting the current movement of goods in the service of reuse rather than consumption.

Hong Kong Architects Convert Plastic Waste into Public Benches to Combat Pollution

The Shing Mun River in Sha Tin, a residential town in Hong Kong, has struggled with plastic waste pollution for years. Household waste that is not properly recycled will either end up in landfills or floating in the river. In 2018 almost 17 million plastic items, or 40,000 items daily, were found to be drained into the ocean via the Shing Mun River, mostly being food packaging, cutleries, and household plastic bottles. This quantity of plastic pollution in the river and surrounding environment could eventually jeopardize the natural ecosystem irreversibly.

Foster + Partners Transforms Historic Industrial Building into Offices for Acciona in Madrid, Spain

Foster + Partners is leading massive refurbishment works on a historic building in Madrid. The renovation project that will put in place an office building for Acciona, seeks to revitalize an abandoned old industrial building built in 1905, generating over 10,000 square-meters of new spaces.

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Reduce, Reuse and Recycle: the Three R's Rule Applied to Architecture

As levels of pollutant emissions have increased over the years, awareness has also grown regarding actions that can be taken to minimize the damage caused to the planet. As a way to promote waste reduction or prevention, the 3 R's rule is created: reduce, reuse and recycle. These actions, together with sustainable consumption standards, have been promoted as a means to protect natural resources and minimize waste.

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Tiny House Made from Recycled Materials Begins Construction in Bali

Bali-based Stilt Studios has begun construction on a new prefabricated tiny house made out of recycled Tetra Pak cartons. The team has also launched a Kickstarter campaign to create awareness for the use of recycled materials. Designed to promote local, circular economies, the first prototype is now being built and sales of the tiny house will commence in October this year.

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How to Make a Facade with Recycled Materials: 21 Notable Examples

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With the aim of supporting architects to become active agents of sustainable design, this week we present a selection of facades that incorporate different recycled materials. Beyond the typical uses of plastic and glass, in this article, you will find innovative materials such as mattress springs, ice cream containers, plastic chairs, and recycled waste from agricultural and industrial products. A look at 21 remarkable projects using recycled materials to create an attractive facade.

The Contemporary Remodelling of Traditional Materials in Chinese Vernacular Architecture

Constrained by a lack of transportation and resources, vernacular architecture has started adapting the distinct strategy of utilizing local materials. By analyzing projects which have successfully incorporated these features into their design, this article gives an overview of how traditional materials, such as tiles, metal, rocks, bamboo, wooden sticks, timber, rammed earth and bricks are being transformed through vernacular architecture in China.

Towards a Common Practice of Material Recycling

Making material recycling commonplace within the architectural field would require a top-down approach in adapting the industry’s processes and standards to create a suitable framework for the task. However, individual endeavours are bringing about change within the profession, pushing for a reconsideration of architecture’s relationship to waste. This article looks at some of the initiatives that are spearheading the transition towards a common practice of material recycling.

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