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recycled materials: The Latest Architecture and News

Repurposing Discarded Waste Materials Into a 100%* Recycled Washbasin

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Producing sustainable materials and products demands constant analysis of how we conserve resources and manage waste effectively. This unfolds within a scenario where the environmental impacts of global warming and the climate crisis are becoming increasingly evident. In that context, sustaining the dialogue on waste disposal is fundamental to positively impacting our environment and maximizing circular economy opportunities.

Embracing this perspective and demonstrating a commitment to sustainability through waste reduction and resource conservation, VitrA has created an entire washbasin with 100%* recycled waste materials, including discarded ceramics from its production process. This innovative product has been designed to have a minimal environmental impact and reduce the global warming potential of its production by 30% per product, transforming materials once considered waste into valuable resources.

Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s L’Arc de Triomphe Wrapped to Be Recycled by Parley for the Oceans

Two years ago, on September 18, 2021, Christo and Jeanne-Claude's L'Arc de Triomphe, Wrapped, 1961–2021, was inaugurated. The monumental public artwork wrapped the Parisian monument in over 25,000 square meters of silvery fabric tied in place with 7,000 meters of red rope. The materials, all made out of woven polypropylene, a type of thermoplastic, are now being reused, upcycled, and recycled, following the artists’ vision. Most of the materials will be transformed to serve practical uses for future public events in Paris. The Christo and Jeanne-Claude Foundation is also collaborating with Gagosian to bring Christo’s early works to London’s East End for an exhibition open from October 6-22, 2023.

Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s L’Arc de Triomphe Wrapped to Be Recycled by Parley for the Oceans - Image 1 of 4Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s L’Arc de Triomphe Wrapped to Be Recycled by Parley for the Oceans - Image 2 of 4Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s L’Arc de Triomphe Wrapped to Be Recycled by Parley for the Oceans - Image 3 of 4Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s L’Arc de Triomphe Wrapped to Be Recycled by Parley for the Oceans - Image 4 of 4Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s L’Arc de Triomphe Wrapped to Be Recycled by Parley for the Oceans - More Images+ 5

How to Use Alternative Products and Materials to Reduce a Project’s Carbon Footprint

Working within the restrictions of a limited carbon footprint can be one of the hardest – but also most rewarding – parts of a modern architect’s role. Whether to suit a large multinational corporation’s sustainability report, to achieve LEED status or similar for a commercial developer, or to build an eco-home for a climate-conscious private client – or even one who just wants to spend less on energy, it’s imperative to keep up-to-date with the latest carbon-neutral and low-carbon building practices and materials.

Whether looking at a project’s structural beginnings, its high-grade finishes, or thinking more holistically about its entire lifetime, there are huge gains to be made with sustainable substitutes and alternatives to traditional materials and techniques.

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Re-Purposing Materials: From Post-Industrial Recyclate to Accessible Furniture

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The role and relationship of furniture in architecture and space design are of great relevance. Designers such as Eileen Gray, Alvar Aalto, Mies Van der Rohe, and Verner Panton conceived furniture —primarily stools and chairs— that endure over time as powerful and timeless elements, with a determining impact on the interior atmosphere. Thus, the relationship between furniture and space becomes a constant dialogue in which design, aesthetics, and materials contribute their dimension.

Today, furniture should not be limited solely to fulfilling an aesthetic and functional role, but should also have a purpose in the context of contemporary design and sustainable development. It is essential to reflect on and question the processes and choice of materials in the manufacturing of these elements, in addition to the value they bring to interior spaces. In this context, HEWI has taken a step forward by creating the Re-seat family, consisting of stools and chairs made from post-industrial recycled materials (PIR), sourced in part from the processes of the company itself and a regional supplier, both based in Bad Arolsen, Germany. It also features integrated solutions with universal design in mind, making a statement in favor of innovation and eco-design.

Sunlight Shadows for Slow but Colorful Façade Movements with Pierre Brault

When transparent facade elements deliberately evolve from the course of the sun, we can explore a fascinating slow movement in stark contrast to the hectic urban street life on the ground. Especially the French designer Pierre Brault has responded to the accelerated rhythm of our society with facade installations that combine the principle of the sundial with colorful pop design. His three-dimensional works made of recycled colored plexiglass mesmerize through simple but dramatic movements of colored shadows. In the interview, Brault explains his inspiration, the experimental approach and his interest in working responsibly with material.

CNAD National Art, Crafts and Design Center / Ramos Castellano Arquitectos

CNAD National Art, Crafts and Design Center / Ramos Castellano Arquitectos - Exterior Photography, Public Architecture, Facade, DoorCNAD National Art, Crafts and Design Center / Ramos Castellano Arquitectos - Public ArchitectureCNAD National Art, Crafts and Design Center / Ramos Castellano Arquitectos - Interior Photography, Public Architecture, Table, ChairCNAD National Art, Crafts and Design Center / Ramos Castellano Arquitectos - Interior Photography, Public Architecture, Handrail, ChairCNAD National Art, Crafts and Design Center / Ramos Castellano Arquitectos - More Images+ 49