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Recycled Materials

The Luxury Pavilion Built From Recycled Bedsprings

06:00 - 29 November, 2017
The Luxury Pavilion Built From Recycled Bedsprings, Courtesy of Fahed + Architects
Courtesy of Fahed + Architects

Boutique firm, Fahed + Architects have developed a temporary pavilion for Abwab 2017, the highlight of Dubai Design Week that exhibits designers’ talent from across the Middle East, North Africa and South Asia.

A commitment to the environment is at the core of Fahed + Architects philosophy, so it was necessary to create a structure out of 100% recyclable material from the local waste management company, Bee’ah. The outer skin of the pavilion is a mesh of entwined bedsprings that naturally lends itself to an organic form, floating amongst the surrounding buildings.

Arkitema Architects Designs 30 Shipping Container Apartments in Roskilde, Denmark

08:00 - 24 October, 2017
Arkitema Architects Designs 30 Shipping Container Apartments in Roskilde, Denmark, Courtesy of Arkitema Architets
Courtesy of Arkitema Architets

Beat Box: 30 apartments in 48 containers to transform the Danish neighborhood of Musicon, adjacent to the famous Roskilde Festival area. Designed by Arkitema Architects and constructed by Container Living, Beat Box is an integral part of Roskilde’s goal to revamp Musicon over the next 15 years by adding 1,000 jobs and 1,000 homes.

Meet the Mobile Dwelling Space Named B.O.B.

08:00 - 24 September, 2017
Meet the Mobile Dwelling Space Named B.O.B., © Adam Shilling
© Adam Shilling

Three M. Arch. candidates at Montana State University, Jonathan Chavez, Kimball Kaiser and Adam Shilling, won an Undergraduate Scholars Program research grant which they used to fund their design-build project: B.O.B., the Backyard Office Box. B.O.B. is a kit of parts which, when put together, create a 150-square-foot dwelling space. The design team, also known as Tr3s, wanted their project to be adaptable to a variety of sites and users. B.O.B. can function as an additional space to already existing projects or standalone as a temporary shelter.

© Adam Shilling © Kimball Kaiser © Kimball Kaiser © Kimball Kaiser + 19

This House was Built in 5 Days Using Recycled Plastic Bricks

06:00 - 1 May, 2017
Construction of house made of recycled plastic bricks.. Image Courtesy of Conceptos Plásticos
Construction of house made of recycled plastic bricks.. Image Courtesy of Conceptos Plásticos

Ten years ago when Colombian Fernando Llanos tried to build his own house in Cundinamarca, he realized that moving the materials from Bogota was going to be very difficult. After mulling it over, he decided to build his house out of plastic, and after a series of trials and errors, he ended up meeting architect Óscar Méndez, who developed his thesis on the same subject, and together they founded the company Conceptos Plásticos (Plastic Concepts) in 2011. 

The innovative local company managed to patent its system of bricks and pillars made of recycled plastic, which is then put together like Lego pieces in a construction system that lets you build houses up to two stories high in five days.

Temporary shelter in Guapi (Colombia) for 42 families displaced by armed conflict.. Image Courtesy of Conceptos Plásticos Temporary shelter in Guapi (Colombia) for 42 families displaced by armed conflict.. Image Courtesy of Conceptos Plásticos Temporary shelter in Guapi (Colombia) for 42 families displaced by armed conflict.. Image Courtesy of Conceptos Plásticos Temporary shelter in Guapi (Colombia) for 42 families displaced by armed conflict.. Image Courtesy of Conceptos Plásticos + 16

Pavilion Made from Aluminum Cans and Cracked Clay Wins 2017 City of Dreams Competition

08:00 - 23 March, 2017
Pavilion Made from Aluminum Cans and Cracked Clay Wins 2017 City of Dreams Competition, Courtesy of Team Aesop (Josh Draper, Lisa Ramsburg, Powell Draper, Edward M. Segal, and Max Dowd)
Courtesy of Team Aesop (Josh Draper, Lisa Ramsburg, Powell Draper, Edward M. Segal, and Max Dowd)

Cast & Place has been announced as the winner of the 2017 City of Dreams competition to create a pavilion for New York City’s Governors Island. Held by not-for-profit arts organization FIGMENT, the AIANY Emerging New York Architects Committee, and the Structural Engineers Association of New York, the competition called for a design to be the hub of FIGMENT’s free community arts festival during Summer 2017, based on questions of the future of New York, how design can confront environmental challenges, and how architecture can be built from recycled or borrowed material.

With these questions in mind, Cast & Place was conceptualized as a pavilion made entirely from waste. 300,000 recycled aluminum cans, cast into the cracks of dried clay, will form structural panels that assemble into shaded spaces for performance and play.

Courtesy of Team Aesop (Josh Draper, Lisa Ramsburg, Powell Draper, Edward M. Segal, and Max Dowd) Courtesy of Team Aesop (Josh Draper, Lisa Ramsburg, Powell Draper, Edward M. Segal, and Max Dowd) Courtesy of Team Aesop (Josh Draper, Lisa Ramsburg, Powell Draper, Edward M. Segal, and Max Dowd) Courtesy of Team Aesop (Josh Draper, Lisa Ramsburg, Powell Draper, Edward M. Segal, and Max Dowd) + 9

RMIT Researchers Develop a Lighter, Better Brick Made With Cigarette Butts

16:00 - 10 June, 2016
RMIT Researchers Develop a Lighter, Better Brick Made With Cigarette Butts, © Flickr cc user letsbook. Licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
© Flickr cc user letsbook. Licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

One man’s trash is another man’s building material. Researchers from the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (commonly known as RMIT University) have developed a technique for making bricks out of one of the world’s most stubborn forms of pollution: discarded cigarette butts. Led by Dr. Abbas Mohajerani, the team discovered that manufacturing fired-clay bricks with as little as 1 percent cigarette butt content could completely offset annual worldwide cigarette production, while also producing a lighter, more efficient brick.

Vincent Callebaut Imagines "Oceanscrapers" 3D Printed from Recycled Trash

12:00 - 25 December, 2015
Vincent Callebaut Imagines "Oceanscrapers" 3D Printed from Recycled Trash, © Vincent Callebaut
© Vincent Callebaut

Vincent Callebaut Architectures has envisioned a radical underwater colony for "climate change refugees" 3D printed from recycled materials taken from the ocean's floating garbage patches. This particular proposal of "oceanscrapers" is sited off the shore of Rio de Janeiro. It's aim is to provide a sustainable habitat with 10,000 housing units, office and work space, sea farms, gardens, community orchards and much more, while fostering marine life.

© Vincent Callebaut © Vincent Callebaut © Vincent Callebaut © Vincent Callebaut + 30

Timelapse: How to Build an Emergency Shelter with Scaffolding and Local Materials

12:00 - 1 August, 2015

Designed and developed by Pilosio Building Peace, RE:BUILD is a construction system for building refugee camps and facilities for emergency assistance. The temporary modular structures can be used as houses, schools, clinics, dining areas or any other space that is urgently needed.

The system, which is easy and fast to assemble, combines scaffolding with natural materials that are easy to find, such as gravel, sand or earth, providing thermal insulation. Containers to channel and reuse rainwater are also incorporated. Watch the timelapse video above to see RE:BUILD in action and learn more about how it was used to build schools for refugee children in Jordan here.

Shigeru Ban's Nepalese Emergency Shelters to be Built from Rubble

16:10 - 29 July, 2015
© VAN, courtesy of Shigeru Ban Architects
© VAN, courtesy of Shigeru Ban Architects

Shigeru Ban Architects has released images of their first emergency shelter prototype designed for Nepal. Planned to be built by the end of August, the simple shelter is designed to be easily assembled by almost anyone. Using connecting modular wooden frames (3ft x 7ft or 90cm x 210cm), salvaged rubble bricks are used to infill the wall's cavities while paper tube trussing supports the roof. This, as Shigeru Ban says, will allow for "quick erection and nearly immediate inhabitation."

Shelter Global Announces 2015 Dencity Competition Winners

14:00 - 18 July, 2015
Shelter Global Announces 2015 Dencity Competition Winners, Courtesy of Shelter Global
Courtesy of Shelter Global

International architecture non-profit Shelter Global has announced the winners of its 2015 Dencity Competition. Out of 300 entries from 50 different countries, three winners and six special mentions were selected.

The competition’s goal was “to foster new ideas on how to handle the growing density of unplanned cities and to spread awareness of the massive problem,” and jury members sought out project designs that empower communities and allow for self-sufficiency. Read about the three winners, after the break.

Izaskun Chinchilla Architects’ Organic Growth Pavilion Opens on Governors Island

08:00 - 23 June, 2015
Izaskun Chinchilla Architects’ Organic Growth Pavilion Opens on Governors Island, Organic Growth Pavilion. Image © Sergio Reyes
Organic Growth Pavilion. Image © Sergio Reyes

Izaskun Chinchilla Architects have made their recycled, upcycled, and bicycled “Organic Growth Pavilion” a reality on New York’s Governors Island. One of two winners of the “City of Dreams” pavilion competition (hosted by AIANY Emerging New York Architects Committee and the Structural Engineers Association of New York), Izaskun Chinchilla Architects carried out a kickstarter campaign to fund the pavilion’s construction.

Organic Growth Pavilion. Image © Sergio Reyes Collaborative Construction of Organic Growth Pavilion. Image © Sergio Reyes Organic Growth Pavilion. Image © Sergio Reyes Organic Growth Pavilion. Image © Sergio Reyes + 10

This Plastic Bottle House Turns Trash into Affordable Housing in Nigeria

18:00 - 6 March, 2015

In the United States alone, more than 125 million plastic bottles are discarded each day, 80 percent of which end up in a landfill. This waste could potentially be diverted and used to construct nearly 10,000, 1200-square-foot homes (taking in consideration it takes an average of 14,000 plastic bottles to build a home that size). Many believe this process could be a viable option for affordable housing and even help solve homelessness.

Renzo Piano and G124 to Transform Italian Suburbs with Shipping Containers

00:00 - 6 February, 2015
Renzo Piano and G124 to Transform Italian Suburbs with Shipping Containers, Courtesy of Renzo Piano and G124
Courtesy of Renzo Piano and G124

A group of six young architects under the leadership of Renzo Piano have been hard at work transforming unused spaces within Italy's suburban framework. The team, known as G124, focuses its efforts on injecting life back into overlooked and forgotten areas of its built environment and stimulating the local economy through design. This most recently entailed transforming a long abandoned area under a viaduct in northeast Rome into a bustling cultural hot-spot.

In Focus: The Architectural Applications of Zinc

00:00 - 6 August, 2014
In Focus: The Architectural Applications of Zinc, The Roof Of Stonehenge - Custom Zinc Panels Fabricated By VMZINC. Image © Peter Cook
The Roof Of Stonehenge - Custom Zinc Panels Fabricated By VMZINC. Image © Peter Cook

Many times, the most innovative minds in architecture aren't the architects themselves. They can come in the form of students, researchers and in this case - providers. We recently asked VMZINC, a company that provides material solutions for architects, a few questions about the use of zinc in architecture, the Stonehenge Visitors Center and more.

AD: How do you create intricate shapes with zinc, as seen in the roof at the Stonehenge Visitors Center?

Seaweed, Salt, Potatoes, & More: Seven Unusual Materials with Architectural Applications

01:00 - 7 May, 2014
Seaweed, Salt, Potatoes, & More: Seven Unusual Materials with Architectural Applications, The “Saltygloo” project is an igloo made of printed translucent modular salt panels. Image © Matthew Millman
The “Saltygloo” project is an igloo made of printed translucent modular salt panels. Image © Matthew Millman

The following article is presented by ArchDaily Materials. In this article, originally published by Metropolis Magazine, Lara Kristin Herndon and Derrick Mead explore seven innovative architectural materials and the designers behind them. Some materials are byproducts, some will help buildings breathe and one is making the leap from 3D printing to 4D printing.

When Arthur C. Clarke said that any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic, he was speaking from the spectator’s point of view, not the magician’s. As our list of smart materials shows, technology solves difficult problems, but getting there requires more than just a wave of the magic wand. Each of the following projects looks past easy answers. Whether it’s a new way of looking at old problems, a new material that maximizes the efficiency of an old technique, or a new method to tap the potential of an abundant or underutilized resource, here are seven innovators who take technology out of the realm of science fiction.

The Sustainable Initiatives Deconstructing Detroit

00:00 - 25 August, 2013
The Sustainable Initiatives Deconstructing Detroit, Image via Flickr. Used under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>Creative Commons</a>
Image via Flickr. Used under Creative Commons

As architects we generally see ourselves as providers of new buildings; we also often see architecture as a way to remedy social ills. For many architects, when presented with a social problem, we try to think of a design for a building which addresses it. But what happens when the problem itself is a surplus of buildings?

This is exactly the situation that Detroit finds itself in today. Thanks to the rapid decline in population since its heyday in the mid 20th Century, the City of Detroit is home to some 78,000 vacant structures. While politicians worldwide win public support by promising new construction and growth, Detroit Mayor Dave Bing proudly announced his plans to demolish 10,000 empty homes before the end of his term.

The process will be inherently wasteful. Fortunately, some are making the best of the situation, with sustainable initiatives that create jobs and economic benefits for residents. Read on after the break to find out how.

The "Open House": From House to Theater in 90 Minutes

01:00 - 21 August, 2013

"Open House" is artist Matthew Mazzotta's latest invention: a compact, faded pink house that unfolds into a ten-piece outdoor theater that seats nearly 100 people. Facing a raised earthen stage, it's a public space made from the remnants of a privately owned blighted property. Reversing the loss of public space that the city of York, Alabama has experienced, Open House has transformed a wasted ruin of a house into an outdoor theatre open to various community events.

STUDIOKCA's 'Head in the Clouds' Pavilion Opens in NYC

00:00 - 14 August, 2013
STUDIOKCA's 'Head in the Clouds' Pavilion Opens in NYC, © Lesley Chang
© Lesley Chang

Back in February of this year, the non-profit arts organization FIGMENT asked “What would an art pavilion made out of recycled materials and based around the idea of 'The City of Dreams' look like to you?.” Brooklyn-based STUDIOKCA beat out over 200 other submissions in the competition with their Head in the Clouds pavilion, now open to the public on Governors Island in NYC.