1. ArchDaily
  2. Stone

Stone: The Latest Architecture and News

Landscape Architects Lead Bhutan’s Mindfulness City

“The Mindfulness City will be a sustainable city. To be mindful is to be aware — to perform best,” said Giulia Frittoli, partner and head of landscape at BIG. The Kingdom of Bhutan is a landlocked Buddhist country in the eastern Himalayas, nestled between China and India. It covers 14,000 square miles and has a population of nearly 800,000.

The Royal Office of Bhutan asked BIG, Arup, and Cistri to develop a plan for a new Mindfulness City in Gelephu in southern Bhutan, near the border with India. The city will span 386 square miles and include a new international airport, railway connections, hydroelectric dam, university, spiritual center, and public spaces.

Landscape Architects Lead Bhutan’s Mindfulness City - Image 1 of 4Landscape Architects Lead Bhutan’s Mindfulness City - Image 2 of 4Landscape Architects Lead Bhutan’s Mindfulness City - Image 3 of 4Landscape Architects Lead Bhutan’s Mindfulness City - Image 4 of 4Landscape Architects Lead Bhutan’s Mindfulness City - More Images+ 3

From Wood, Stone, Steel, and Uni Colors: A Decorative Collection for Fast-Moving Trends

 | Sponsored Content

Nowadays, the cycles of change around society and architecture have generated new urban models, emerging technologies, and design trends that underline the need for constant adaptability in all areas. In this context, aspects such as flexibility, reliability, and simplicity emerge as distinctive elements, both in architecture and in the components that constitute it, including materials. This is why lines such as the EGGER Decorative Collection 24+, crafted from wood-derived materials, seek to redefine concepts through a rolling series, updated at most every two years. This dynamic enables a more agile response to new trends, influences, and product innovations that arise in the built environment.

Does AI Correlate Materiality with Contemporary Architecture? An Experiment with Six Building Materials

As AI has become more accessible, we have witnessed examples illustrating its diverse applications. Prominent among these are generative AIs, which excel in their ability to “create” images through prompts, many distinguished by their composition and vividness. These AI systems are neural networks with billions of parameters, trained to create images from natural language, using a dataset of text–image pairs. Thus, although the initial question posed by Turing in the 1950s, “Can machines think?” still recurs today, the generation of images and text is grounded in existing information, limiting their capabilities.

What has surprised many is the increasingly apparent closeness to overcoming the Turing test and the growing similarity, in terms of visualizations, to what an architect with skills in this field can achieve. In this context, while the debate persists in the architectural community about whether AI can process architectural concepts, this article explores how it interprets materials to develop these visual representations. With that in mind, a single prompt was developed for this experiment (with materiality as its variable) to delve into the obtained results.

Julio Vargas Neumann on the Future of Materials: 'Today's Reinforced Concrete will Disappear'

With an air of simplicity and wisdom, engineer Julio Vargas Neumann welcomes us. His two dogs accompany us as we descend after the necessary ascent to enter, and we are also accompanied by the stone walls defining the lot. We sit down and begin - or continue - the interview and conversation regarding the value of 'shicras', local materials, and earth construction. We also discuss criticisms of cement, aluminum, and steel, as well as perspectives on the future of materials in Peru and the world. Likewise, we delve into the long-neglected and recurrent rural problem in South America, discussing the inexorable need to change paradigms and priorities.

Julio Vargas Neumann on the Future of Materials: 'Today's Reinforced Concrete will Disappear' - Image 1 of 4Julio Vargas Neumann on the Future of Materials: 'Today's Reinforced Concrete will Disappear' - Image 2 of 4Julio Vargas Neumann on the Future of Materials: 'Today's Reinforced Concrete will Disappear' - Image 3 of 4Julio Vargas Neumann on the Future of Materials: 'Today's Reinforced Concrete will Disappear' - Image 4 of 4Julio Vargas Neumann on the Future of Materials: 'Today's Reinforced Concrete will Disappear' - More Images+ 23

Clad in Translucent Marble Slabs, The Perelman Performing Arts Center Opens in New York’s Ground Zero

After over two decades in the making, the Perelman Performing Arts Center opened to the public on September 19, 2023. The luminous cube-shaped building was designed by the architecture firm REX, led by Joshua Ramus, to become one of New York City’s cultural keystones and the final piece in the 2023 Master Plan for the rebuilding of the 16-acre World Trade Center site. The inaugural season will feature commissions, world premieres, co-productions, and collaborative work across theater, dance, music, opera, film, and more. While only eight stories high, the venue stands out due to its monolithic façade composed of translucent veined Portuguese marble.

Clad in Translucent Marble Slabs, The Perelman Performing Arts Center Opens in New York’s Ground Zero - Image 1 of 4Clad in Translucent Marble Slabs, The Perelman Performing Arts Center Opens in New York’s Ground Zero - Image 2 of 4Clad in Translucent Marble Slabs, The Perelman Performing Arts Center Opens in New York’s Ground Zero - Image 3 of 4Clad in Translucent Marble Slabs, The Perelman Performing Arts Center Opens in New York’s Ground Zero - Image 4 of 4Clad in Translucent Marble Slabs, The Perelman Performing Arts Center Opens in New York’s Ground Zero - More Images+ 15

Reinventing History: 20 Remarkable Renovations of Stone Houses in Spain

What does architectural restoration, transformation, or renovation entail? What factors are involved in their processes? When delving into the interiors of Spanish homes, we set out to discover the various methodologies, tools, and technical and construction strategies that are often employed, with stone as the main protagonist.

Natural or Artificially Pigmented Materials? Exploring Color Variations and their Effects

Materiality is a determining factor in shaping the character and experience of a building. Playing with the aesthetic and tactile qualities of materials, the design process encompasses their analysis, selection, and arrangement to create purposeful and sensory-rich spaces. Alongside textures and patterns, exploring materiality also involves the study of color possibilities. The versatile role of color in architectural materials extends beyond mere aesthetics, as it can broaden design opportunities and influence emotional responses, functionality, cultural relevance, and environmental performance. 

Even though each material has its distinctive inherent color, the addition of artificial or natural pigments can modify them in favor of the project’s identity. Delving into the debate on maintaining raw aesthetics or changing a material’s natural hues, we showcase various projects to study the differences between using natural versus artificial pigmentation of glass, concrete, brick, stone and wood.

Natural or Artificially Pigmented Materials? Exploring Color Variations and their Effects - Image 1 of 4Natural or Artificially Pigmented Materials? Exploring Color Variations and their Effects - Image 2 of 4Natural or Artificially Pigmented Materials? Exploring Color Variations and their Effects - Image 3 of 4Natural or Artificially Pigmented Materials? Exploring Color Variations and their Effects - Image 4 of 4Natural or Artificially Pigmented Materials? Exploring Color Variations and their Effects - More Images+ 66

Color in Hospitality Design: 20 Restaurant Interiors that Set the Right Tone

In the competitive world of restaurants – particularly at a time when influencers are gaining more and more control over the sphere of fine dining –, creating a memorable meal experience is crucial for attracting and retaining customers. While factors like food quality and service certainly play pivotal roles in making diners return to their eatery of choice, the impact that restaurant interiors can have on an establishment's longevity should not be overlooked. Among the various elements contributing to a memorable ambiance, color takes center stage. We delve into the significance of striking the right tone in restaurant design through 20 projects from our ArchDaily database.

Color in Hospitality Design: 20 Restaurant Interiors that Set the Right Tone - Image 5 of 4Color in Hospitality Design: 20 Restaurant Interiors that Set the Right Tone - Image 1 of 4Color in Hospitality Design: 20 Restaurant Interiors that Set the Right Tone - Image 2 of 4Color in Hospitality Design: 20 Restaurant Interiors that Set the Right Tone - Image 3 of 4Color in Hospitality Design: 20 Restaurant Interiors that Set the Right Tone - More Images+ 21

Exploring Haus Balma by Kengo Kuma Architects in Vals, Switzerland Through the Lens of Paul Clemence

In his latest photo series, Paul Clemence captures Haus Balma, a residential and commercial building designed by Kengo Kuma Architects. Situated in Vals, at the foothills of the Graubünden Mountains, the building was designed for Truffer AG, a family business founded in 1983, specializing in processed Valser quarzite stone slabs. Typically used as a flooring and roofing material, many architects have used quartzite stones in this region, including Peter Zumthor in his Therme Vals, Norman Foster, and Philippe Stark.

Exploring Haus Balma by Kengo Kuma Architects in Vals, Switzerland Through the Lens of Paul Clemence  - Image 1 of 4Exploring Haus Balma by Kengo Kuma Architects in Vals, Switzerland Through the Lens of Paul Clemence  - Image 2 of 4Exploring Haus Balma by Kengo Kuma Architects in Vals, Switzerland Through the Lens of Paul Clemence  - Image 3 of 4Exploring Haus Balma by Kengo Kuma Architects in Vals, Switzerland Through the Lens of Paul Clemence  - Image 4 of 4Exploring Haus Balma by Kengo Kuma Architects in Vals, Switzerland Through the Lens of Paul Clemence  - More Images+ 22

WXCA Designs Polish History Museum and Polish Army Museum in Warsaw, Poland

In the capital city of Poland, WXCA won a competition to design one of the largest museums completed in Europe today. The museum is now under construction at the Warsaw Citadel. The development is a combination of the Polish History Museum and the Polish Army Museum. Located on the site of a former fortification, the complex will become a culture hub rooted in remembrance.

WXCA Designs Polish History Museum and Polish Army Museum in Warsaw, Poland - Image 1 of 4WXCA Designs Polish History Museum and Polish Army Museum in Warsaw, Poland - Image 2 of 4WXCA Designs Polish History Museum and Polish Army Museum in Warsaw, Poland - Image 3 of 4WXCA Designs Polish History Museum and Polish Army Museum in Warsaw, Poland - Image 4 of 4WXCA Designs Polish History Museum and Polish Army Museum in Warsaw, Poland - More Images+ 11

Take Off Your Shoes: 5 Floors to Experience Barefoot

The skin absorbs matter, and the world is contemplated, touched, heard, and measured through our bodily existence. Juhani Pallasmaa, a Finnish architect known for propagating sensory architecture, defends the notion that, unlike vision, touch is the sense of proximity, becoming a main axis by covering the entire body. It is a fact that, when speaking of touch, the first image that comes to mind is usually contact with hands. However, there are other ways to feel architecture that can be developed in projects, such as the touch of bare feet on a particular surface.

Take Off Your Shoes: 5 Floors to Experience Barefoot - Image 1 of 4Take Off Your Shoes: 5 Floors to Experience Barefoot - Image 2 of 4Take Off Your Shoes: 5 Floors to Experience Barefoot - Image 3 of 4Take Off Your Shoes: 5 Floors to Experience Barefoot - Image 4 of 4Take Off Your Shoes: 5 Floors to Experience Barefoot - More Images+ 13