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Bahaa Ghoussainy

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The Profound Symbolism of the Jewish Museum, Through the Lens of Bahaa Ghoussainy

11:00 - 6 February, 2019
The Profound Symbolism of the Jewish Museum, Through the Lens of Bahaa Ghoussainy, © Bahaa Ghoussainy
© Bahaa Ghoussainy

In the heart of Berlin resides an architectural metaphor of invisibility, emptiness, and anarchy forged by the Second World War upon the Jewish citizens. The expansion of the original Jewish museum, which was first organized as an anonymous competition by the Berlin government, was proposed as a means of bringing back Jewish presence, retracing their culture and religion into the German city. Renowned architect Daniel Libeskind, who was chosen to develop the project, used architecture as a form of expression, and created a museum that narrates the Jewish civilization before, during, and after the Holocaust.

© Bahaa Ghoussainy © Bahaa Ghoussainy © Bahaa Ghoussainy © Bahaa Ghoussainy + 20

Out-to-Out House / L.E.FT Architects

00:00 - 16 August, 2018
Out-to-Out House / L.E.FT Architects, © Bahaa Ghoussainy
© Bahaa Ghoussainy

© Bahaa Ghoussainy © Bahaa Ghoussainy © Bahaa Ghoussainy © Bahaa Ghoussainy + 43

  • Architects

  • Location

    Faqra, Lebanon
  • Category

  • L E FT Architects

    Makram el Kadi, Ziad Jamaleddine
  • Team

    Daniel Colvard, Ana Conchan, Valeria Fervorari, Mahdi Sabbagh, Karine Yassine
  • Area

    250.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

The Amir Shakib Arslan Mosque Photographed by Bahaa Ghoussainy

09:30 - 17 June, 2018
The Amir Shakib Arslan Mosque Photographed by Bahaa Ghoussainy, © Bahaa Ghoussainy
© Bahaa Ghoussainy

In the town of Moukhtara, Mount Lebanon, L.E.FT Architects have transformed a 100-square-meter structure into a symbolic, picturesque mosque. The Amir Shakib Arslan mosque is a rendition of old versus new with a white steel structure overlaid onto an existing building of cross-vaulted masonry. The angular geometry of the steel plates is a result of the structure’s alignment in relation to Mecca.

Lebanese architectural photographer Bahaa Ghoussainy has released a new series of images which accentuate the contrast that lies between the architectural design of the mosque and the traditional representation of Islamic mosques and prayers. The juxtaposition of an Islamic holy place built in a non-Islamic town is translated into the architecture’s design, merging two dissonant styles into one complementary structure.

© Bahaa Ghoussainy © Bahaa Ghoussainy © Bahaa Ghoussainy © Bahaa Ghoussainy + 18

Zaha Hadid's Issam Fares Institute Stands Out in New Photography by Bahaa Ghoussainy

09:30 - 20 May, 2018
© Bahaa Ghoussainy
© Bahaa Ghoussainy

With its monumental form, swept diagonal lines and elevated concrete walkways, the Issam Fares Institute building at the American University of Beirut by Zaha Hadid Architects emphasizes movement, evoking the speed of contemporary life as it presides over a connecting system of pedestrian walkways. Begun in 2006 and completed in 2014, Hadid’s award-winning concrete and glass building makes a bold statement with its prominent 21-meter, two-story-tall cantilever, which creates a covered courtyard and reduces the footprint of the building to avoid blocking circulation routes. The elevated walkways carry pedestrians through the branches of huge Cypress and Ficus trees, many of which significantly predate the building at 120 to 180 years old.

© Bahaa Ghoussainy © Bahaa Ghoussainy © Bahaa Ghoussainy © Bahaa Ghoussainy + 23

Rafael Moneo's Beirut Souks Explored in Photographs by Bahaa Ghoussainy

08:00 - 14 May, 2018
Rafael Moneo's Beirut Souks Explored in Photographs by Bahaa Ghoussainy, © Bahaa Ghoussainy
© Bahaa Ghoussainy

When Spanish architect Rafael Moneo won the Pritzker Prize in 1996, the jury identified his ability to see buildings as lasting built entities—their lives extending beyond architectural drawings—as integral to his success. The South Souks, Moneo’s 2009 project in Beirut, Lebanon, indeed responds to a long history and anticipates a lasting future. After the city’s historic souq (outdoor marketplace) was destroyed during the Lebanese Civil War, developer Solidere began rebuilding the commercial area in 1991. As part of the project, Moneo designed an arcaded shopping district that follows the ancient Hellenistic grid and retains original street names.

© Bahaa Ghoussainy © Bahaa Ghoussainy © Bahaa Ghoussainy © Bahaa Ghoussainy + 26

Photos Capture the Luxurious Life Inside Herzog & de Meuron's Beirut Terraces

09:30 - 7 January, 2018
© Bahaa Ghoussainy
© Bahaa Ghoussainy

In the rapidly burgeoning city of Beirut, the post-war building boom is far from over. Much like its middle-eastern neighbors, it boasts of a plump share of designer architecture—as critic Oliver Wainwright refers to it, “a diverse shopping list”. It is here that the Beirut Terraces, a residential complex designed by Herzog & De Meuron, rises up to 119 meters, occupying a prominent place in the city’s skyline. In this collection of photographs by Bahaa Ghoussainy, one sees the Beirut Terraces from within, getting a glimpse of both the interior, as well as the multiple, unique views offered from inside the building.

© Bahaa Ghoussainy © Bahaa Ghoussainy © Bahaa Ghoussainy © Bahaa Ghoussainy + 29

Plot # 1282 / Bernard Khoury / DW5

02:00 - 30 October, 2017
© Bahaa Ghoussainy
© Bahaa Ghoussainy

© Bahaa Ghoussainy © Ieva Saudargaite © Bahaa Ghoussainy © Ieva Saudargaite + 43