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Rory Stott

I've been ArchDaily's Managing Editor since July 2014, after starting as an ArchDaily intern and spending around 18 months climbing the ladder. I have a BA in Architecture from Newcastle University, and I am particularly interested in how overlooked elements of architectural culture - from the media, to competitions to procurement processes - can alter the designs we end up with.

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Spotlight: Le Corbusier

Born in the small Swiss city of La Chaux-de-Fonds, Charles-Édouard Jeanneret-Gris—better known by his pseudonym Le Corbusier (October 6, 1887 – August 27, 1965)—is widely regarded as the most important architect of the 20th century. As a gifted architect, provocative writer, divisive urban planner, talented painter, and unparalleled polemicist, Le Corbusier was able to influence some of the world’s most powerful figures, leaving an indelible mark on architecture that can be seen in almost any city worldwide.

Palace of the Assembly at Chandigarh. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/70608042@N00/1321525329'>Flickr user chiara_facchetti</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> Villa Savoye. Image © Flavio Bragaia Church at Firminy. Image © Richard Weil Swiss Pavilion. Image Courtesy of Samuel Ludwig + 25

Spotlight: Jean Nouvel

The winner of the Wolf Prize in 2005 and the Pritzker of 2008, French architect Jean Nouvel has attempted to design each of his projects without any preconceived notions. The result is a variety of projects that, while strikingly different, always demonstrate a delicate play with light and shadow as well as a harmonious balance with their surroundings. It was this diverse approach that led the Pritzker Prize Jury in their citation to characterize Nouvel as primarily "courageous" in his "pursuit of new ideas and his challenge of accepted norms in order to stretch the boundaries of the field."

Institut du Monde Arabe. Image © Georges Fessy One Central Park. Image © Murray Fredericks Doha Office Tower, Qatar. Image © Nelson Garrido Police Headquearters & Charleroi Danses / Ateliers Jean Nouvel + MDW Architecture. Image © Filip Dujardin + 15

Marble Quarrying Looks Even More Awesome Than You Imagined

In this video from NOWNESS, an excerpt from Yuri Ancarani's documentary "Il Capo" (The Chief), the filmmaker captures the mesmerizing business of Marble extraction in the hills of Northwest Italy. The prized delicacy of the Carrara stone's surface is juxtaposed against the dramatic size and weight of the blocks they are removing, which eventually fall with an earth-shattering thud. Similarly the rugged power of the excavators is in marked contrast to the precise, understated gestures of the chief himself, who directs his workers with a complex series of predetermined hand signals.

"Marble quarries are places so unbelievable and striking, they almost feel like they are big theaters or sets," explains Yuri Ancarani. "I was so taken by the chief, watching him work. How he can move gigantic marble blocks using enormous excavators, but his own movements are light, precise and determined."

This article was originally published on February 25, 2015.

Our Readers Show Off Their Most Impressive Architectural Models

In many ways, architectural models are strange objects. On one hand, like drawings, models are a representation of something else—a building—that might exist already but in most cases is so far only hypothetical. On the other hand, they are miniature constructions in themselves, which can be appreciated for their craftsmanship and intricacy. Perhaps this is why architects find models so fascinating; they can be simultaneously admired as an object in themselves and as a vision of something greater.

Earlier this year, we asked our readers to send us images of their most impressive models, and the response clearly showed this fascination. We received photographs of a wide variety of models, from sensible and meticulously constructed miniatures to jaw-dropping expressive outbursts. From over 300 entries, we've narrowed down our readers' submissions to just 21 of the most awe-inspiring examples, splitting them into 5 categories to reflect the incredible range of ways that people have made their models worth looking at.

Pinecote Pavilion by Fay Jones / Model by Garrett Wineinger + Laura Leticia + Angelika Sophi. Image courtesy of Garrett Wineinger Type Variant House by VJAA / Model by Sarah Hefner, Ross Davidson + Zach Dawkins. Image courtesy of Sarah Hefner, Ross Davidson, Zach Dawkins Theater on Rundle Mountain / Dalton Kaun. Image courtesy of Dalton Kaun New Orleans Aquatic Center / Charles Weimer. Image courtesy of Charles Weimer + 90

Spotlight: Richard Rogers

As one of the leading architects of the British High-Tech movement, Pritzker Prize-winner Richard Rogers stands out as one of the most innovative and distinctive architects of a generation. Rogers made his name in the 1970s and '80s, with buildings such as the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris and the Headquarters for Lloyd's Bank in London. To this day his work plays with similar motifs, utilizing bright colors and structural elements to create a style that is recognizable, yet also highly adaptable.

NEO Bankside. Image © Edmund Sumner The Leadenhall Building. Image © Richard Bryant – Courtesy of British Land/Oxford Properties Lloyd's of London Building. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/martinrp/332669479'>Flickr user dalbera</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-ND 2.0</a> Millennium Dome. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/jamesjin/58712717/'>Flickr user jamesjin</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> + 18

Spotlight: Álvaro Siza

One of the most highly regarded architects of his generation, Portugese architect Álvaro Siza (born 25 June 1933) is known for his sculptural works that have been described as "poetic modernism." When he was awarded the Pritzker Prize in 1992, Siza was credited as being a successor of early modernists: the jury citation describes how "his shapes, molded by light, have a deceptive simplicity about them; they are honest."

The Building on the Water. Image © Fernando Guerra |  FG+SG Expo'98 Portuguese National Pavilion. Image © Flickr user Pedro Moura Pinheiro Fundação Iberê Camargo. Image © Grazielle Bruscato Leça Swimming Pools. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Swimming_Pool_Piscinas_de_Mar%C3%A9s_Le%C3%A7a_da_Palmeira_by_%C3%81lvaro_Siza_foto_Christian_G%C3%A4nshirt.jpg'>Wikimedia user Christian Gänshirt</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 4.0</a> + 15

Spotlight: Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown

Through their pioneering theory and provocative built work, husband and wife duo Robert Venturi (born June 25, 1925) and Denise Scott Brown (born October 3, 1931) were at the forefront of the postmodern movement, leading the charge in one of the most significant shifts in architecture of the 20th century by publishing seminal books such as Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture (authored by Robert Venturi alone) and Learning from Las Vegas (co-authored by Venturi, Scott Brown and Steven Izenour).

Spotlight: Antoni Gaudí

When Catalan architect Antoni Gaudí (25 June 1852 – 10 June 1926) graduated from the Barcelona Architecture School in 1878, the director of the school Elies Rogent reportedly declared: "Gentlemen, we are here today either in the presence of a genius or a madman!" [1] Well over a century later, this tension is still evident in Gaudí's work; though he is widely regarded as a genius architect, his distinctive style stands as a singularity in architectural history—simultaneously awe-inspiring and bizarre, never fitting into any stylistic movement, and never adapted or emulated, except by those still working to complete his magnum opus, Barcelona's famous Sagrada Família.

Casa Milà. Image Courtesy of Samuel Ludwig Parc Güell. Image Courtesy of Samuel Ludwig Colònia Güell. Image Courtesy of Samuel Ludwig Casa Batlló. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/srboisvert/306517767'>Flickr user srboisvert</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> + 10

Spotlight: Benedetta Tagliabue

Benedetta Tagliabue (born 24 June 1963) is an Italian architect known for designs which are sensitive to their context and yet still experimental in their approach to forms and materials. Her diverse and complex works have marked her Barcelona-based firm EMBT as one of the most respected Spanish practices of the 21st century.

Santa Caterina Market. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/ligthelm/8271776325'>Flickr user ligthelm</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> Copagri Pavilion ‘Love IT’. Image © Marcela Grassi Scottish Parliament Building. Image © Dave Morris The Spanish Pavilion at the 2010 Shanghai Expo. + 9

Spotlight: Frank Lloyd Wright

In 1991, the American Institute of Architects called him, quite simply, “the greatest American architect of all time.” Over his lifetime, Frank Lloyd Wright (June 8, 1867 – April 9, 1959) completed more than 500 architectural works; many of them are considered masterpieces. Thanks to the wide dissemination of his designs and his many years spent teaching at the school he founded, few architects in history can claim to have inspired more young people into joining the architecture profession.

S.C. Johnson and Son Administration Building. Image © Jeff Dean Unity Temple. Image © Sean Marshall Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/57537089@N00/198494302/'>Flickr user gomattolson</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> Taliesin West. Image © <a href='https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:TaliesinWest2010.JPG'>Wikimedia user AndrewHorne</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY 3.0</a> + 25

Spotlight: Carlo Scarpa

One of the most enigmatic and underappreciated architects of the 20th century, Carlo Scarpa (June 2, 1906 – November 28, 1978) is best known for his instinctive approach to materials, combining time-honored crafts with modern manufacturing processes. In a 1996 documentary directed by Murray Grigor, Egle Trincanato, the President of the Fondazione Querini Stampalia for whom Scarpa renovated a Venetian palace in 1963, described how "above all, he was exceptionally skillful in knowing how to combine a base material with a precious one."

Brion Tomb and Sanctuary. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/batintherain/8192243875'>Flickr user batintherain</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> Garden at the Querini Stampalia. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/dalbera/8142985275'>Flickr user dalbera</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> Olivetti Showroom. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/dalbera/8068024216'>Flickr user dalbera</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> Central Pavilion in the Giardini at the Venice Biennale. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/dalbera/10160349164/'>Flickr user dalbera</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> + 10

Spotlight: Norman Foster

Arguably the leading name of a generation of internationally high-profile British architects, Norman Foster (born 1 June 1935)—or to give him his full title Norman Robert Foster, Baron Foster of Thames Bank of Reddish, OM, HonFREng—gained recognition as early as the 1970s as a key architect in the high-tech movement, which continues to have a profound impact on architecture as we know it today.

Queen Alia International Airport. Image © Nigel Young / Foster + Partners The Gherkin . Image © Nigel Young Hearst Tower. Image © Chuck Choi Beijing Airport. Image © Foster + Partners + 46

Spotlight: Toyo Ito

As one of the leading architects of Japan's increasingly highly-regarded architecture culture, 2013 Pritzker Laureate Toyo Ito (born June 1, 1941) has defined his career by combining elements of minimalism with an embrace of technology, in a way that merges both traditional and contemporary elements of Japanese culture.

Tower of Winds. Image © Tomio Ohashi Tama Art University Library. Image © Iwan Baan Sendai Mediatheque. Image © Nacasa & Partners Inc. Taichung Metropolitan Opera House. Image © Lucas K. Doolan + 16

Spotlight: Rafael Moneo

As the first ever Spanish architect to receive the Pritzker Prize, Rafael Moneo (born 9 May 1937) is known for his highly contextual buildings which nonetheless remain committed to modernist stylings. His designs are regularly credited as achieving the elusive quality of "timelessness"; as critic Robert Campbell wrote in his essay about Moneo for the Pritzker Prize, "a Moneo building creates an awareness of time by remembering its antecedents. It then layers this memory against its mission in the contemporary world."

National Museum of Roman Art. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/pictfactory/2840558654'>Flickr user pictfactory</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> Columbia University Northwest Corner Building / Rafael Moneo, Davis Brody Bond, and Moneo Brock Studio. Image © Michael Moran Studio Puig Tower / Rafael Moneo + Antonio Puig, Josep Riu GCA Architects + Lucho Marcial. Image © Rafael Vargas Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels, Los Angeles. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/cwsteeds/5324514176/'>Flickr user cwsteeds</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> + 11

Spotlight: Herzog & de Meuron

Led by Jacques Herzog (born 19 April 1950) and Pierre de Meuron (born 8 May 1950), most descriptions of Herzog & de Meuron projects are almost paradoxical: in one paragraph they will be praised for their dedication to tradition and vernacular forms, in the next for their thoroughly modern innovation. However, in the hands of Herzog & de Meuron this is no paradox, as the internationally renowned architectural duo combine tradition and innovation in such a way that the two elements actually enhance each other.

VitraHaus. Photography by Iwan Baan © Vitra 1111 Lincoln Road. Image © Nelson Garrido, Reprinted with permission from MBeach1, LLLP. Parrish Art Museum. Image © Matthu Placek Messe Basel New Hall. Image © Messe Basel + 29

Spotlight: I.M. Pei

Chinese-American architect Ieoh Ming Pei (born April 26, 1917), is arguably the greatest living member of the modernist generation of architects. When he received his Pritzker Prize in 1983, the jury citation stated that he "has given this century some of its most beautiful interior spaces and exterior forms."

Spotlight: Peter Behrens

If asked to name buildings by German architect and designer Peter Behrens (14 April 1868 – 27 February 1940), few people would be able to answer with anything other than his AEG Turbine Factory in Berlin. His style was not one that lends itself easily to canonization; indeed, even the Turbine Factory itself is difficult to appreciate without an understanding of its historical context. Despite this, Behrens' achievements are not to be underestimated, and his importance to the development of architecture might best be understood by looking at three young architects who worked in his studio around 1910: Le Corbusier, Mies van der Rohe, and Walter Gropius.

Spotlight: Kisho Kurokawa

Nakagin Capsule Tower, Tokyo. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Nakagin.jpg'>Wikimedia user Jordy Meow</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>
Nakagin Capsule Tower, Tokyo. Image © Wikimedia user Jordy Meow licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

Kisho Kurokawa (April 8th 1934 – October 12th 2007) was one of Japan's leading architects of the 20th century, perhaps most well-known as one of the founders of the Metabolist movement of the 1960s. Throughout the course of his career, Kurokawa advocated a philosophical approach to understanding architecture that was manifest in his completed projects throughout his life.

Nagoya City Art Museum. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:KurokawaNagoyaCityArtMuseum.jpg'>Wikimedia user Chris 73</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> Toshiba-IHI Pavilion at the 1970 Osaka Expo. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/m-louis/1209773173'>Flickr user m-louis</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> Van Gogh Museum Exposition Wing, Amsterdam. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/14174853@N04/4192474953/'>Flickr user kmaschke</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> Nakagin Capsule Tower, Tokyo. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Nakagin.jpg'>Wikimedia user Jordy Meow</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> + 8