Six Essential Materials & The Architects That Love Them

In case you missed it, we’re re-publishing this popular post for your material pleasure. Enjoy!

To celebrate the recent launch of our US product catalog, ArchDaily Materials, we’ve coupled six iconic architects with what we deem to be their favourite or most frequently used material. From Oscar Neimeyer’s sinuous use of to Kengo Kuma‘s innovative use of , which materials define some of the world’s best known architects?

Norman Foster Talks Meeting Niemeyer

and Lord Norman Foster in 2011. “He was in wonderful spirits—charming and, notwithstanding his 104 years, his youthful energy and creativity were inspirational.”. Image Courtesy of Foster + Partners

In this interview, originally published by Metropolis Magazine as “Q&A: Norman Foster on Niemeyer, Nature and Cities“, Paul Clemence talks with Lord Foster about his respect for Niemeyer, their meeting shortly before the great master’s death, and how Niemeyer’s work has influenced his own.

Last December, in the midst of a hectic schedule of events that have come to define Art Basel/Design Miami, I found myself attending a luncheon presentation of the plans for the Norton Museum of Art in Palm Beach, by Foster + Partners. While chatting with Lord Foster, I mentioned my Brazilian background and quickly the conversation turned to Oscar Niemeyer. Foster mentioned the talk he and Niemeyer had shortly before the Brazilian’s passing (coincidentally that same week in December marked the first anniversary of Niemeyer’s death). Curious to know more about the meeting and their chat, I asked Foster about that legendary encounter and some of the guiding ideas behind his design for the Norton.

Read on for the interview

Material Inspiration: 10 Projects Inspired by Concrete

To celebrate the launch of ArchDaily Materials, our new product catalog, we’ve rounded up 10 awesome projects from around the world that were inspired by one material: . Check out the projects after the break…

Remembering Neimeyer: The Works of a Master

© Flickr User el_floz

Many architects enter the profession with hopes of creating something that outlives them, something that is bigger than themselves, that can advocate for a better world. Oscar Niemeyer was such an architect, one who fought for designs that would serve everyone. The master of Brazilian architecture passed away one year ago after complications from a previous kidney condition. In honor of what would have been his birthday today, we’ve rounded up a few of his masterpieces, from his elegant and curvy Niterói Contemporary Art Museum, his collaboration on the United Nations Headquarters in New York, the traditional spectacle space of his Sambadrome, the spiraling Niemeyer Center in Aviles, and the powerful parabolic expression in his Cathedral of Brasilia. Enjoy!

A Year Without Oscar

Niemeyer observa maquete da escola projetada em Belo Horizonte (MG). Image Courtesy of ON

It’s been exactly one year since the world first mourned the passing of a great master of 20th century architecture: .

After 104 years of life, the renowned architect left a profound legacy. His works  - known for their impressive curves, embrace of  light, and profound relationship to their surroundings – made him an icon. Not just in , but the world.

Fate of Niemeyer Memorial Uncertain After Damaging Fire

© Ricardo Matsukawa / Terra

A recent fire at ’s Memorial of Latin America, designed by , has left the fate of the building uncertain.

According to the chairman of the Memorial, João Batista de Andrade, they are waiting for the Fire Department and the police to finish their investigations before determining what action will be taken: ”We need to know what is the impact of the fire on the building’s structure. If we need to demolish, regrettably it will have to be done. If safety requires, we will demolish.”

More details on the fire, after the break…

LEGO® Architecture Landmark Series: The United Nations Headquarters

Courtesy of LEGO®

LEGO® has officially announced the next addition to their architecture-inspired products: The United Nations Headquarters. Standing alongside ’s East River, the United Nations Headquarters is a beacon of modernism and international collaboration, designed by a team of multinational architects including Le Corbusier and Oscar Niemeyer. Scaling 5 inches high x 8 inches wide x 6 inches deep, this representation of the UN Headquarters costs  $49.99.

Check out more about the building and its history here.

Night Photographs of Oscar Niemeyer’s Brasilia Win at the 2013 International Photography Awards

© Andrew Prokos

Night photographs of the Brazilian capital created by architectural photographer Andrew Prokos are among this year’s winners at the International Photography Awards competition. Entitled “Niemeyer’s ” the series of photographs capture the surreal architecture of Oscar Niemeyer, who shaped the Brazilian capital for over 50 years.

More fantastic photographs and information on the awards after the break.

Koolhaas Revamps UN Building’s Modernist-Era Lounge

Courtesy of Frank Oudeman

Dutch designers, Rem Koolhaas and Hella Jongerius, have revamped the delegates’ lounge in the United Nations building just in time for the 68th General Assembly this week. The “workshop of peace” lounge space, originally designed in 1952 by Wallace K. Harrison in collaboration with renowned modernists Le Corbusier and Oscar Neimeyer, now sports a range of pastel-colored sofas and lounge chairs, opting for minimal intervention in attempts to maximize the social space. Read more about the UN North Delegates lobby on Gizmodo.

AD Classics: Niterói Contemporary Art Museum / Oscar Niemeyer

Courtesy of wikiarquitectura.com

The Contemporary Art Museum, also know as the MAC, was designed by the famed Brazilian architect and completed in 1996. This iconic saucer-shaped structure, situated on a cliffside above Guanabara bay in the city of , brilliantly frames the panoramic views of the city of Rio De Janeiro and encapsulates the simple, yet brilliant signature aesthetic of Niemeyer.

Graffiti Artist’s Mural Honors Oscar Niemeyer

© Nacho Doce (Reuters)

A true legacy in the field of architecture and beyond, Oscar Niemeyer, who died just this past December at the age of 104, has traveled into the heart of many, one of which is graffiti artist . In honor of the Brazilian architect, Kobra created a 61-yard art piece on the side of a building in Sao Paulo’s financial district. The immense, colorful mural cannot be missed as people pass by and admire the work. Expressing Niemeyer’s love for concrete, curves and Le Corbusier, the mural truly encompasses the architect’s aim to, “…produce an architecture that serves everyone and not just a group of privileged people.” More images can be viewed after the break.

In Niemeyer and Costa Masks, Architects Protest the City of Brasilia

© Danilo Verpa/Folhapress

Wearing masks with the faces of and Lúcio Costa, architects and urban planners swarmed the 50th Annual IAB (Institute of Architects of Brazil) Awards in Rio de Janeiro this week. The architects were protesting a contract the city government of Brasilia struck with a Singaporean firm to create an urban masterplan outlining the next 50 years of ’s future.

Happy Birthday Oscar

Oscar Niemeyer in front of the Palazzo Mondadori. Photo via Mondadori.com

Today would have been Oscar Niemeyer’s 105th birthday. The Pritzker-Prize winning, Brazilian master died last Thursday, December 6th, due to complications from a previous kidney condition.

Take a moment to look back on all our Niemeyer coverage, and remember the man who truly saw architecture as a higher calling. As Neimeyer once said: ”The architect’s role is to fight for a better world, where he can produce an architecture that serves everyone and not just a group of privileged people.”

Films & Architecture: “Oscar Niemeyer – Life is a Breath of Air”

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By now, there’s no architect in the world unaware of ’s passing, or the legacy he left over his 104 years.

In honor of the greatest Brazilian architect of our time, we invite you to enjoy this interesting documentary, which shows how Neimeyer’s work, which changed the paradigm of architecture and went beyond any stereotype, was just as unique as his noble perspective on life.

Oscar Niemeyer, Brazil’s Modernist Icon, Dies

in front of the Palazzo Mondadori. Photo via Mondadori.com

After complications from a previous kidney condition   Brazilian architect Oscar Niemeyer has passed away at Rio de Janeiro’s Samaritano Hospital.

For 104 years, Oscar Ribeiro de Almeida Niemeyer Soares (December 15, 1907 – December 5, 2012) lived a life of “intensity.” Born in Rio de Janeiro, he is best known for helping to design the United Nations Headquarters in New York in 1947 and for designing much of the city of Brasilia. As he described his style:  “I consciously ignored the highly praised right angle and the rational architecture of T-squares and triangles in order to wholeheartedly enter the world of curves…” He received the Pritzker Prize in 1988.

Niemeyer was one of those few architects who is recognized and admired by people from all walks of life, especially by those in his native Brazil, where he is considered an icon. Indeed, always motivated to design for his fellow man, Niemeyer was a Brazilian first, and an architect second.

In Niemeyer’s words: “It is important that the architect think not only of architecture but of how architecture can solve the problems of the world. The architect’s role is to fight for a better world, where he can produce an architecture that serves everyone and not just a group of privileged people.”

More about the legacy of the Master of Brazilian Architecture:

The Construction of Brasilia, Photos by Marcel Gautherot

© Marcel Gautherot

   

The construction of Brasilia, the federal capital of and an icon of Brazilian , began in 1956. Initially planned by the urbanist Lúcio Costa for 500,000 inhabitants (today it holds 2.5 million), Brasilia gained fame for its remarkable buildings, designed by Oscar Niemeyer. Today, Brasilia is the only 20th century city in the world to have been awarded the status of Historical and Cultural Heritage of Humanity by UNESCO.

In honor of the late Oscar Niemeyer, we’ve gathered some stunning black and white photos taken by Franco-Brazilian photographer Marcel Gautherot during the construction of Niemeyer’s emblematic buildings – including the Palácio do Planalto, Palácio de Alvorada (official residence of the President of Brazil), the Cathedral of Brasilia and the National Congress of Brazil. See them all, after the break…

The work of Oscar Niemeyer, by Patricia Parinejad

©

Our friend and architectural photographer Patricia Parinejad , shared with us photos of her extensive Niemeyer archives  showing the works of the Brazilian master with a particular and personal focus, capturing textures, materials, context, and the people in his architecture.

More after the break.

Tribute to Oscar Niemeyer by Norman Foster

Courtesy of Foster + Partners

Yesterday, Brazilian architect Oscar Niemeyer passed away at 104 . We share with you a tribute to the master written by Lord Norman Foster:

I was deeply saddened to learn of the death of . He was an inspiration to me – and to a generation of architects. Few people get to meet their heroes and I am grateful to have had the chance to spend time with him in Rio last year.