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Rory Stott

I've been ArchDaily's Managing Editor since July 2014, after starting as an ArchDaily intern and spending around 18 months climbing the ladder. I have a BA in Architecture from Newcastle University, and I am particularly interested in how overlooked elements of architectural culture - from the media, to competitions to procurement processes - can alter the designs we end up with.

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Degrowth: the Radical (Re)Action Needed to Avoid Total Economic and Environmental Collapse

09:30 - 19 November, 2018
Degrowth: the Radical (Re)Action Needed to Avoid Total Economic and Environmental Collapse, Courtesy of Otherothers. ImageOtherothers' installation at the 2015 Chicago Biennial looked at the impact of the standard suburban Australian home. Their installation proposed a shrinkage of the typology's spatial impact
Courtesy of Otherothers. ImageOtherothers' installation at the 2015 Chicago Biennial looked at the impact of the standard suburban Australian home. Their installation proposed a shrinkage of the typology's spatial impact

The world faces some significant challenges. The UN climate change report released last month, which explained that we may have just 12 years and need “unprecedented changes” to avoid devastating effects from climate change, was released into a world that seemed to be plenty busy processing other things, such as rising economic inequality, increasingly partisan politics, escalating conflicts, and refugee crises, to name a few.

According to the curators of the 2019 Oslo Architecture Triennale, our economic and climate-related challenges (and perhaps more challenges besides) are underpinned by a single unifying cause: the expectation for continuous economic growth. With their theme for next year’s Triennale, they highlight the concept of “degrowth,” a growing movement to overturn our economic assumptions and establish a managed contraction of our economies and resource consumption, with the eventual goal that society will become calmer, less focused on productivity, and more focused on quality of life. And, as they see it, the architects of this retooled society could be—well, architects.

Spotlight: Paulo Mendes da Rocha

13:30 - 25 October, 2018
Spotlight: Paulo Mendes da Rocha, Museu Brasileiro de Escultura (MuBE). Image © Paul Clemence
Museu Brasileiro de Escultura (MuBE). Image © Paul Clemence

All space must be attached to a value, to a public dimension. There is no private space. The only private space that you can imagine is the human mind.
Paulo Mendes da Rocha, May 26, 2004

Paulo Mendes da Rocha is one of Brazil's greatest architects and urbanists. Born in Vitória, Espírito Santo in 1928, Mendes da Rocha won the 2006 Pritzker Prize, and is one of the most representative architects of the Brazilian Paulista School, also known as "Paulista Brutalism" that utilizes more geometric lines, rougher finishes and bulkier massing than other Brazilian Modernists such as Oscar Niemeyer.

Museu Brasileiro de Escultura (MuBE). Image © Paul Clemence New Leme Gallery. Image © Leonardo Finotti Cais das Artes. Image Courtesy of Paulo Mendes da Rocha Museu dos Coches. Image © Fernando Guerra |  FG+SG + 13

AD Classics: Prentice Women's Hospital / Bertrand Goldberg

22:00 - 6 October, 2018
AD Classics: Prentice Women's Hospital / Bertrand Goldberg, Courtesy of Landmark Illinois
Courtesy of Landmark Illinois

This article was originally published on September 28, 2013. To read the stories behind other celebrated architecture projects, visit our AD Classics section.

Hospital buildings, with their high standards of hygiene and efficiency, are a restrictive brief for architects, who all too often end up designing uninspiring corridors of patient rooms constructed from a limited palette of materials. However, this was not the case in Bertrand Goldberg's 1975 Prentice Women's Hospital. The hospital is the best example of a series of Goldberg-designed medical facilities, which all adhere to a similar form: a tower containing rooms for patient care, placed atop a rectilinear plinth containing the hospital's other functions.

© C. William Brubaker via Flickr user UIC Digital Collections Courtesy of Landmark Illinois Courtesy of Landmark Illinois © Flickr user seanbirm + 7

Read on for more about this masterwork of humanist brutalism...

Spotlight: Le Corbusier

05:30 - 6 October, 2018
Spotlight: Le Corbusier, Notre Dame du Haut at Ronchamp. Image © <a href='www.flickr.com/photos/9160678@N06/2089042156'>Flickr user scarletgreen</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
Notre Dame du Haut at Ronchamp. Image © Flickr user scarletgreen licensed under CC BY 2.0

Born in the small Swiss city of La Chaux-de-Fonds, Charles-Édouard Jeanneret-Gris—better known by his pseudonym Le Corbusier (October 6, 1887 – August 27, 1965)—is widely regarded as the most important architect of the 20th century. As a gifted architect, provocative writer, divisive urban planner, talented painter, and unparalleled polemicist, Le Corbusier was able to influence some of the world’s most powerful figures, leaving an indelible mark on architecture that can be seen in almost any city worldwide.

Palace of the Assembly at Chandigarh. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/70608042@N00/1321525329'>Flickr user chiara_facchetti</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> Villa Savoye. Image © Flavio Bragaia Church at Firminy. Image © Richard Weil Swiss Pavilion. Image © Samuel Ludwig + 25

Spotlight: Renzo Piano

16:00 - 14 September, 2018
Spotlight: Renzo Piano, The Whitney Museum. Image © Nic Lehoux
The Whitney Museum. Image © Nic Lehoux

Architecture is art, but art vastly contaminated by many other things. Contaminated in the best sense of the word—fed, fertilized by many things.
– Renzo Piano

Italian architect Renzo Piano (born 14 September 1937) is known for his delicate and refined approach to building, deployed in museums and other buildings around the world. Awarded the Pritzker Prize in 1998, the Pritzker Jury compared him to Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, and Brunelleschi, highlighting "his intellectual curiosity and problem-solving techniques as broad and far ranging as those earlier masters of his native land."

Pathé Foundation. Image © Michel Denancé Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum. Image © Nic Lehoux Harvard Art Museums Renovation and Expansion. Image © Nic Lehoux Menil Collection. Image © D Jules Gianakos + 24

Spotlight: Louis Sullivan

16:00 - 3 September, 2018
 © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/chicagoarchitecturetoday/8400309871/'>Flickr user chicagoarchitecturetoday</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>. Image © Flickr user chicagoarchitecturetoday licensed under CC BY 2.0
© Flickr user chicagoarchitecturetoday licensed under CC BY 2.0. Image © Flickr user chicagoarchitecturetoday licensed under CC BY 2.0

Known as Chicago's "Father of Skyscrapers," Louis Sullivan (September 3, 1856 – April 14, 1924) foreshadowed modernism with his famous phrase "form follows function." Sullivan was an architectural prodigy even as a young man, graduating high school and beginning his studies at MIT when he was just 16. After just a year of study he dropped out of MIT, and by the time he was just 24 he had joined forces with Dankmar Adler as a full partner of Adler and Sullivan.

The Guaranty Building in Buffalo, New York. Image © Jack E. Boucher (public domain) The Carson Pirie Scott Building in Chicago, Illinois. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/cjsmithphotography/8656829487'>Flickr user cjsmithphotography</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-NC-SA 2.0</a> The Wainwright Building in St Louis, Missouri. Image © University of Missouri The Wainwright Building in St Louis, Missouri. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:2010-07-04_1880x2820_stlouis_wainwright_building.jpg'>J. Crocker</a> + 8

Spotlight: Jean Nouvel

12:00 - 12 August, 2018
Spotlight: Jean Nouvel , © Iwan Baan
© Iwan Baan

The winner of the Wolf Prize in 2005 and the Pritzker of 2008, French architect Jean Nouvel has attempted to design each of his projects without any preconceived notions. The result is a variety of projects that, while strikingly different, always demonstrate a delicate play with light and shadow as well as a harmonious balance with their surroundings. It was this diverse approach that led the Pritzker Prize Jury in their citation to characterize Nouvel as primarily "courageous" in his "pursuit of new ideas and his challenge of accepted norms in order to stretch the boundaries of the field."

Institut du Monde Arabe. Image © Georges Fessy One Central Park. Image © Murray Fredericks Doha Office Tower, Qatar. Image © Nelson Garrido Police Headquearters & Charleroi Danses / Ateliers Jean Nouvel + MDW Architecture. Image © Filip Dujardin + 15

Impractical Chinese Skyscraper Features 108-Meter-Tall Facade Waterfall

16:00 - 24 July, 2018

A skyscraper in Guiyang, China, has attracted headlines thanks to a daring water feature built into its facade. On one side, the 121-meter (397-foot) tall Liebian Building in Guiyang, China, features a spectacular waterfall, providing a dramatic spectacle from the plaza below. At 108-meters (350-feet), the waterfall is among the tallest artificial waterfalls in the world—and easily the largest artificial waterfall located in an urban area, with other record breakers being artificial additions to river and canal networks.

Spotlight: Richard Rogers

08:00 - 23 July, 2018
Spotlight: Richard Rogers, Centre Georges Pompidou / Richard Rogers + Renzo Piano. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/dalbera/2496569412'>Flickr user dalbera</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
Centre Georges Pompidou / Richard Rogers + Renzo Piano. Image © Flickr user dalbera licensed under CC BY 2.0

As one of the leading architects of the British High-Tech movement, Pritzker Prize-winner Richard Rogers stands out as one of the most innovative and distinctive architects of a generation. Rogers made his name in the 1970s and '80s, with buildings such as the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris and the Headquarters for Lloyd's Bank in London. To this day his work plays with similar motifs, utilizing bright colors and structural elements to create a style that is recognizable, yet also highly adaptable.

NEO Bankside. Image © Edmund Sumner The Leadenhall Building. Image © Richard Bryant – Courtesy of British Land/Oxford Properties Lloyd's of London Building. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/martinrp/332669479'>Flickr user dalbera</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-ND 2.0</a> Millennium Dome. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/jamesjin/58712717/'>Flickr user jamesjin</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> + 18

Open Call: The Best Student Design-Build Projects

06:00 - 20 July, 2018
Open Call: The Best Student Design-Build Projects

When learning about architecture, there is no replacement for practical experience: seeing how materials can be joined together, how structural elements respond to the stresses placed upon them, or how construction techniques can alter the finished project. For this reason, it is a good idea to give students a chance for some hands-on experience building real structures—something that, due to budgetary constraints and the academic culture of many architecture schools, has sadly been uncommon in the past.

However, in recent years, this culture has started to shift, with increasing numbers of architecture schools finding ways for students to be involved in construction projects, from small, temporary interventions and pavilions, to larger permanent buildings. In order to show the excellent work that can be done in an educational context, for the fourth time ArchDaily is calling on students and professors to submit the design-build projects they have completed in the past year. As always, we're teaming up with all of ArchDaily en Español, ArchDaily Brasil, and ArchDaily China, in the hope that we can present the best work from students worldwide to a worldwide audience. Read on to find out how you can take part.

Watch Rem Koolhaas at the Moscow Urban Forum

12:52 - 17 July, 2018

At the Moscow Urban Forum, Rem Koolhaas spoke to Vladimir Pozner about his life and work, including how he has been influenced by Russian architecture. The pair discuss how the city of Moscow has evolved and the role that it currently has in the world. The event was originally streamed live on YouTube, meaning you can watch the recording of the discussion above.

Europe's Tallest Skyscraper Approaches Completion in St Petersburg

12:30 - 12 July, 2018
Europe's Tallest Skyscraper Approaches Completion in St Petersburg, © Viktor Sukharukov Courtesy of Lakhta Center Multifunctional Complex
© Viktor Sukharukov Courtesy of Lakhta Center Multifunctional Complex

The Lakhta Center, a 400,000-square-meter complex which includes Europe's tallest skyscraper, is approaching completion in St Petersburg. Designed by RMJM (authoring team led by Tony Kettle), the complex provides a new landmark in the northwest of the city—an area on the coastline of the Gulf of Finland which has seen significant development in recent years with the completion of the St Petersburg Stadium, a passenger seaport, and a number of park spaces including the Park of the 300th Anniversary of Saint Petersburg.

The centerpiece of the development, the 462-meter-tall Lakhta Center Tower, is not only the tallest building in Europe, but also the first supertall skyscraper in St Petersburg, the world's second-tallest twisting skyscraper after the Shanghai Tower, and the world's northernmost skyscraper.

© Kamil Nureev Courtesy of Lakhta Center Multifunctional Complex Courtesy of Lakhta Center Multifunctional Complex © Stanislav Zaburdaev Courtesy of Lakhta Center Multifunctional Complex Courtesy of Lakhta Center Multifunctional Complex + 19

VTN Architects Designs Hotel with Cascading Greenery for Narrow Site in Vietnam

10:40 - 11 July, 2018
Courtesy of VTN Architects
Courtesy of VTN Architects

VTN Architects has released their design for the Chic-Land Hotel currently under construction in Da Nang, Vietnam. Located opposite the beach, the site offers excellent views to the east—but is constrained by the fact that it is only 15 meters wide. With this in mind, the designers opted for a 21-story building, offering 129 rooms with balconies shaded by a cascade of plants.

Courtesy of VTN Architects Courtesy of VTN Architects Courtesy of VTN Architects Courtesy of VTN Architects + 12

SOM Receives Planning Permission for Angular Skyscraper in City of London

12:20 - 10 July, 2018
Courtesy of SOM
Courtesy of SOM

This morning, planning permission was awarded for the construction of 100 Leadenhall Street, an SOM-designed skyscraper in the eastern cluster of skyscrapers in the City of London. At 263.4 meters tall, the building will be the third tallest in the cluster, trailing only 1 Undershaft (305 meters), which is approved but yet to begin construction, and 22 Bishopsgate (278 meters), which is currently under construction. The Shard, at 310 meters, is also nearby on the south of the river.

Just Looking at Buildings Can Give People Headaches—Here's How to Minimize the Problem

17:10 - 9 July, 2018
Just Looking at Buildings Can Give People Headaches—Here's How to Minimize the Problem, © Nikola Olic
© Nikola Olic

Architecture can give you a headache. That sentence probably doesn't sound surprising for anyone who has dealt with the stress of practicing or studying architecture but, increasingly, psychologists are beginning to understand that you don't need to work on architectural designs for buildings to cause you pain. In an interesting article published by The Conversation, Arnold J Wilkins, a Professor of Psychology at the University of Essex, discusses how discomfort, headaches, and even migraines can be caused or exacerbated by simply looking at certain visual stimuli—with the straight lines and repetitive patterns of urban environments singled out as the main culprit.

Gothic Architecture Meets High Fashion in Guo Pei’s Gravity-Defying Dresses

17:05 - 6 July, 2018

In what has to be one of the most spectacular collisions of high fashion and architecture, fashion designer Guo Pei has tapped into the "immutable" qualities of Gothic buildings with a series of outfits inspired by vaults, spires, flying buttresses, and elaborate window tracery. According to Vogue, the Chinese designer described her work as "a dialogue between the human body and spatial dimension," while Pei's own Facebook post explained her Fall 2018 collection with just a short phrase: "Time flows unhurriedly, while architecture stands immutably."

Many of the designs in Pei's collection seem to have been conceived as architectural structures in themselves, projecting outwards from the body to create striking church-like forms. Converting the rigid stone structures of the Gothic style into fabrics designed to hang from the human body is clearly a challenging technical feat, and proves extremely satisfying for architecture-obsessed onlookers when achieved with the audacity brought to her work by Pei.

Spotlight: Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown

10:30 - 25 June, 2018
Spotlight: Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown, Franklin Court, Philadelphia. Image © Mark Cohn
Franklin Court, Philadelphia. Image © Mark Cohn

Through their pioneering theory and provocative built work, husband and wife duo Robert Venturi (born June 25, 1925) and Denise Scott Brown (born October 3, 1931) were at the forefront of the postmodern movement, leading the charge in one of the most significant shifts in architecture of the 20th century by publishing seminal books such as Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture (authored by Robert Venturi alone) and Learning from Las Vegas (co-authored by Venturi, Scott Brown and Steven Izenour).

Spotlight: Álvaro Siza

05:30 - 25 June, 2018
Spotlight: Álvaro Siza, The Building on the Water. Image © Fernando Guerra |  FG+SG
The Building on the Water. Image © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG

One of the most highly regarded architects of his generation, Portugese architect Álvaro Siza (born 25 June 1933) is known for his sculptural works that have been described as "poetic modernism." When he was awarded the Pritzker Prize in 1992, Siza was credited as being a successor of early modernists: the jury citation describes how "his shapes, molded by light, have a deceptive simplicity about them; they are honest."

The Building on the Water. Image © Fernando Guerra |  FG+SG Expo'98 Portuguese National Pavilion. Image © Flickr user Pedro Moura Pinheiro Fundação Iberê Camargo. Image © Grazielle Bruscato Leça Swimming Pools. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Swimming_Pool_Piscinas_de_Mar%C3%A9s_Le%C3%A7a_da_Palmeira_by_%C3%81lvaro_Siza_foto_Christian_G%C3%A4nshirt.jpg'>Wikimedia user Christian Gänshirt</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 4.0</a> + 15