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Rory Stott

I've been ArchDaily's Managing Editor since July 2014, after starting as an ArchDaily intern and spending around 18 months climbing the ladder. I have a BA in Architecture from Newcastle University, and I am particularly interested in how overlooked elements of architectural culture - from the media, to competitions to procurement processes - can alter the designs we end up with.

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Spotlight: Richard Rogers

12:30 - 23 July, 2017
Spotlight: Richard Rogers, Centre Georges Pompidou / Richard Rogers + Renzo Piano. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/dalbera/2496569412'>Flickr user dalbera</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
Centre Georges Pompidou / Richard Rogers + Renzo Piano. Image © Flickr user dalbera licensed under CC BY 2.0

As one of the leading architects of the British High-Tech movement, Pritzker Prize-winner Richard Rogers stands out as one of the most innovative and distinctive architects of a generation. Rogers made his name in the 1970s and '80s, with buildings such as the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris and the Headquarters for Lloyd's Bank in London. To this day his work plays with similar motifs, utilizing bright colors and structural elements to create a style that is recognizable, yet also highly adaptable.

NEO Bankside. Image © Edmund Sumner The Leadenhall Building. Image © Richard Bryant – Courtesy of British Land/Oxford Properties Lloyd's of London Building. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/martinrp/332669479'>Flickr user dalbera</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-ND 2.0</a> Millennium Dome. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/jamesjin/58712717/'>Flickr user jamesjin</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> +15

Spotlight: Philip Johnson

14:00 - 8 July, 2017
Spotlight: Philip Johnson, The Glass House. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/mbschlemmer/7468240258'>Flickr user mbschlemmer</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
The Glass House. Image © Flickr user mbschlemmer licensed under CC BY 2.0

When he was awarded the first ever Pritzker Architecture Prize in 1979, the jury described Philip Johnson (July 8, 1906 – January 25, 2005) as someone who “produced consistent and significant contributions to humanity and the environment," adding that "as a critic and historian, he championed the cause of modern architecture and then went on to design some of his greatest buildings.” However, even after winning the Pritzker Prize at age 73, Johnson still had so much more of his legacy to build: in the years after 1979, Johnson almost completely redefined his style, adding another chapter to his influence over the architecture world.

AT&T Building. Image © David Shankbone The Crystal Cathedral. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/papalars/5377438096/'>Flickr user papalars</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-ND 2.0</a> The Glass House. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/mbschlemmer/7468236748'>Flickr user mbschlemmer</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> The New York State Pavilion. Image © Flickr user CaptainKidder <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:1964%E2%80%931965_New_York_World%27s_Fair_New_York_State_Pavilion-2.jpg'>via Wikimedia</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> +16

Spotlight: Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown

14:00 - 25 June, 2017
Spotlight: Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown, Franklin Court, Philadelphia. Image © Mark Cohn
Franklin Court, Philadelphia. Image © Mark Cohn

Through their pioneering theory and provocative built work, husband and wife duo Robert Venturi (born June 25, 1925) and Denise Scott Brown (born October 3, 1931) were at the forefront of the postmodern movement, leading the charge in one of the most significant shifts in architecture of the 20th century by publishing seminal books such as Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture (authored by Robert Venturi alone) and Learning from Las Vegas (co-authored by Venturi, Scott Brown and Steven Izenour).

Spotlight: Álvaro Siza

12:00 - 25 June, 2017
Spotlight: Álvaro Siza, The Building on the Water. Image © Fernando Guerra |  FG+SG
The Building on the Water. Image © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG

One of the most highly regarded architects of his generation, Portugese architect Álvaro Siza (born 25 June 1933) is known for his sculptural works that have been described as "poetic modernism." When he was awarded the Pritzker Prize in 1992, Siza was credited as being a successor of early modernists: the jury citation describes how "his shapes, molded by light, have a deceptive simplicity about them; they are honest."

The Building on the Water. Image © Fernando Guerra |  FG+SG Expo'98 Portuguese National Pavilion. Image © Flickr user Pedro Moura Pinheiro Fundação Iberê Camargo. Image © Grazielle Bruscato Leça Swimming Pools. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Swimming_Pool_Piscinas_de_Mar%C3%A9s_Le%C3%A7a_da_Palmeira_by_%C3%81lvaro_Siza_foto_Christian_G%C3%A4nshirt.jpg'>Wikimedia user Christian Gänshirt</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 4.0</a> +15

Spotlight: Antoni Gaudí

06:00 - 25 June, 2017
Spotlight: Antoni Gaudí, La Sagrada Familia's passion facade. Image © Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Família
La Sagrada Familia's passion facade. Image © Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Família

When Catalan architect Antoni Gaudí (25 June 1852 – 10 June 1926) graduated from the Barcelona Architecture School in 1878, the director of the school Elies Rogent reportedly declared: "Gentlemen, we are here today either in the presence of a genius or a madman!" [1] Well over a century later, this tension is still evident in Gaudí's work; though he is widely regarded as a genius architect, his distinctive style stands as a singularity in architectural history—simultaneously awe-inspiring and bizarre, never fitting into any stylistic movement, and never adapted or emulated, except by those still working to complete his magnum opus, Barcelona's famous Sagrada Família.

Casa Milà. Image © Samuel Ludwig Parc Güell. Image © Samuel Ludwig Colònia Güell. Image © Samuel Ludwig Casa Batlló. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/srboisvert/306517767'>Flickr user srboisvert</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> +10

Spotlight: Benedetta Tagliabue

12:00 - 24 June, 2017
Spotlight: Benedetta Tagliabue, Santa Caterina Market. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/ligthelm/8271776325'>Flickr user ligthelm</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
Santa Caterina Market. Image © Flickr user ligthelm licensed under CC BY 2.0

Benedetta Tagliabue (born 24 June 1963) is an Italian architect known for designs which are sensitive to their context and yet still experimental in their approach to forms and materials. Her diverse and complex works have marked her Barcelona-based firm EMBT as one of the most respected Spanish practices of the 21st century.

Santa Caterina Market. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/ligthelm/8271776325'>Flickr user ligthelm</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> Copagri Pavilion ‘Love IT’. Image © Marcela Grassi Scottish Parliament Building. Image © Dave Morris The Spanish Pavilion at the 2010 Shanghai Expo. +9

Spotlight: Paolo Soleri

08:00 - 21 June, 2017
Spotlight: Paolo Soleri, Arcosanti. Image © Tomiaki Tamura
Arcosanti. Image © Tomiaki Tamura

Italian-American architect Paolo Soleri (21 June 1919 – 9 April 2013) made his name as a countercultural icon and urban visionary, best known for his theory of "arcology"—a combination of architecture and ecology—and for Arcosanti, the prototype town in the Arizona desert which embodied his ideals and became his life's work, which he founded in 1970 and continued to work on right up until his death in 2013.

<a href='https://arcosanti.org/'>via arcosanti.org</a>. ImageSectional view of Soleri's 2001 design for a completed version of Arcosanti, entitled "Arcosanti 5000" <a href='https://arcosanti.org/'>via arcosanti.org</a>. ImageArcosanti <a href='https://arcosanti.org/'>via arcosanti.org</a>. ImageArcosanti Panoramic view of Arcosanti. Image © Ken Howie +8

Open Call: The Best Student Design-Build Projects

04:00 - 12 June, 2017
Open Call: The Best Student Design-Build Projects

It's graduation time. As universities around the globe—or at least most in the Northern hemisphere, where over 80% of the world's universities are located—come to the end of the academic year, many university architecture studios have recently closed out the construction of pavilions, installations, and other small educational projects. For the third straight yearArchDaily is calling on recently-graduated readers to submit their projects for our round-up of the best pavilions, installations and experimental structures created by students from all over the world.

Once again, we're teaming up with all of ArchDaily en Español, ArchDaily Brasil, and ArchDaily China, in the hope that we can present the best work from graduating students worldwide to a worldwide audience. Read on to find out how you can take part.

"Inspirational" Frank Lloyd Wright Quotes for Every Occasion

09:30 - 8 June, 2017
"Inspirational" Frank Lloyd Wright Quotes for Every Occasion

It's no secret that Frank Lloyd Wright was among the architecture profession's more colorful characters. Known as an outspoken and often unforgiving egotist, Wright's appreciation of architecture was outshone only by his appreciation for himself—which is perhaps understandable, given that he ranks among the 20th century's great geniuses. For better or worse (probably worse), Wright's reputation has clung to the profession, thanks in large part to Ayn Rand, who used Wright as inspiration for the incorrigible lead character of one of her most famous books, The Fountainhead.

But in truth, most architects have at least a little of Frank Lloyd Wright's personality contained within their own. It's difficult to have self-confidence without a shred of ego, and since design requires a lot of self-confidence, many of us can relate—if only occasionally—to the outrageous attitude of The United States' greatest architect. In honor of Frank Lloyd Wright's 150th birthday today, we've collected some of Wright's most "insightful" comments and turned them into posters that can inspire you no matter what life throws at you. Now, take your humility, lock it in a tiny box deep inside your mind, and join us on a journey through 150 years of wisdom...

Spotlight: Frank Lloyd Wright

02:30 - 8 June, 2017
Spotlight: Frank Lloyd Wright, Fallingwater House. Image © Western Pennsylvania Conservancy
Fallingwater House. Image © Western Pennsylvania Conservancy

In 1991, the American Institute of Architects called him, quite simply, “the greatest American architect of all time.” Over his lifetime, Frank Lloyd Wright (June 8, 1867 – April 9, 1959) completed more than 500 architectural works; many of them are considered masterpieces. Thanks to the wide dissemination of his designs and his many years spent teaching at the school he founded, few architects in history can claim to have inspired more young people into joining the architecture profession.

S.C. Johnson and Son Administration Building. Image © Jeff Dean Unity Temple. Image © Sean Marshall Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/57537089@N00/198494302/'>Flickr user gomattolson</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> Taliesin West. Image © <a href='https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:TaliesinWest2010.JPG'>Wikimedia user AndrewHorne</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY 3.0</a> +25

Spotlight: Carlo Scarpa

06:00 - 2 June, 2017
Spotlight: Carlo Scarpa, Museo Castelvecchio. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/andreaosti/4505639981/'>Flickr user andreaosti</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
Museo Castelvecchio. Image © Flickr user andreaosti licensed under CC BY 2.0

One of the most enigmatic and underappreciated architects of the 20th century, Carlo Scarpa (June 2, 1906 – November 28, 1978) is best known for his instinctive approach to materials, combining time-honored crafts with modern manufacturing processes. In a 1996 documentary directed by Murray Grigor, Egle Trincanato, the President of the Fondazione Querini Stampalia for whom Scarpa renovated a Venetian palace in 1963, described how "above all, he was exceptionally skillful in knowing how to combine a base material with a precious one."

Brion Tomb and Sanctuary. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/batintherain/8192243875'>Flickr user batintherain</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> Garden at the Querini Stampalia. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/dalbera/8142985275'>Flickr user dalbera</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> Olivetti Showroom. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/dalbera/8068024216'>Flickr user dalbera</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> Central Pavilion in the Giardini at the Venice Biennale. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/dalbera/10160349164/'>Flickr user dalbera</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> +10

Google Unveils Images of its New BIG and Heatherwick-Designed London Campus

13:30 - 1 June, 2017
Google Unveils Images of its New BIG and Heatherwick-Designed London Campus, Courtesy of Google
Courtesy of Google

Google has submitted the design for its new London office to Camden Council for planning approval. Designed by BIG and Heatherwick Studio, the 11-story "groundscraper" design will be located in King's Cross, and will combine with their existing office at 6 Pancras Square and a third, forthcoming building to create a campus for up to 7,000 Google employees.

Courtesy of Google Courtesy of Google Courtesy of Google Courtesy of Google +6

Spotlight: Norman Foster

06:00 - 1 June, 2017
Spotlight: Norman Foster, Spaceport America. Image © Nigel Young
Spaceport America. Image © Nigel Young

Arguably the leading name of a generation of internationally high-profile British architects, Norman Foster (born 1 June 1935)—or to give him his full title Norman Robert Foster, Baron Foster of Thames Bank of Reddish, OM, HonFREng—gained recognition as early as the 1970s as a key architect in the high-tech movement, which continues to have a profound impact on architecture as we know it today.

Queen Alia International Airport. Image © Nigel Young / Foster + Partners The Gherkin . Image © Nigel Young Hearst Tower. Image © Chuck Choi Beijing Airport. Image Courtesy of Foster + Partners +37

Spotlight: Toyo Ito

04:00 - 1 June, 2017
Spotlight: Toyo Ito, Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2002 / Toyo Ito + Cecil Balmond + Arup. Image © Sylvain Deleu
Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2002 / Toyo Ito + Cecil Balmond + Arup. Image © Sylvain Deleu

As one of the leading architects of Japan's increasingly highly-regarded architecture culture, 2013 Pritzker Laureate Toyo Ito (born June 1, 1941) has defined his career by combining elements of minimalism with an embrace of technology, in a way that merges both traditional and contemporary elements of Japanese culture.

Tower of Winds. Image © Tomio Ohashi Tama Art University Library. Image ©  Iwan Baan Sendai Mediatheque. Image © Nacasa & Partners Inc Taichung Metropolitan Opera House. Image © Lucas K. Doolan +15

Chapel Proposal in Senegal Uses Local Materials to Unite the Community

16:00 - 29 May, 2017
Chapel Proposal in Senegal Uses Local Materials to Unite the Community, Courtesy of Cassidy+Wilson
Courtesy of Cassidy+Wilson

Taking third place in the recently-concluded Kaira Looro competition to design a multi-faith place of worship for the community of Tanaf in Senegal, this design by Sean Cassidy and Joe Wilson proposes a circular chapel with a sunken exterior moat in which locals can privately reflect and pray. Meanwhile, the central sanctum is designed to be constructed by locals with handmade clay bricks, forming a design which, as Cassidy and Wilson explain, "literally comes from the 'God given land'" that the community equally "can take pride in and call their own upon completion."

Courtesy of Cassidy+Wilson Courtesy of Cassidy+Wilson Courtesy of Cassidy+Wilson Section. Image Courtesy of Cassidy+Wilson +8

Draw Perfectly At Any Scale With This Augmented Reality App

16:00 - 24 May, 2017

The ability to draw well is one of the most coveted skills in architecture. Unfortunately for those without an innate gift for sketching, it's also one of the most difficult to learn—even if it can, contrary to popular opinion, be learned with commitment and practice. But for those poor souls without such talents, there is now a fix: an app called SketchAR.

Available for iPhone and Android devices that incorporate Google's Tango technology, SketchAR can take photographs or other images, convert them into sketchable line drawings, and then use augmented reality to overlay them onto real-world surfaces.

MVRDV's Skygarden, a Transformed 983-Meter Former Highway, Opens in Seoul

12:45 - 20 May, 2017
MVRDV's Skygarden, a Transformed 983-Meter Former Highway, Opens in Seoul, © Ossip van Duivenbode
© Ossip van Duivenbode

Today the Mayor of Seoul opened the Skygarden, a 983-meter elevated walkway designed by MVRDV which utilizes a formerly abandoned highway in the center of the South Korean capital. Located in Seoul's Central Station district, the 16-meter-high linear park features a living catalog of Korea's indigenous plants, featuring over 24,000 individual plants from 228 species and sub-species. The Skygarden is known in Korean as Seoullo 7017, a name which references the Korean for "Seoul Street," and the 1970 and 2017, the years in which the structure was originally built and subsequently transformed.

© Ossip van Duivenbode © Ossip van Duivenbode © Ossip van Duivenbode © Ossip van Duivenbode +23

Svalbard "Doomsday" Seed Vault Floods After Record Winter Temperatures

18:40 - 19 May, 2017
Svalbard "Doomsday" Seed Vault Floods After Record Winter Temperatures, © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Svalbard_seed_vault_IMG_8751.JPG'>Wikimedia user Bjoertvedt</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>
© Wikimedia user Bjoertvedt licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

Earlier this year, the Global Seed Vault in Svalbard was flooded after record high temperatures over the winter caused some of the permafrost surrounding the vault to melt, reports The Guardian. The building's entrance tunnel was flooded and then froze to create conditions "like a glacier" for those trying to enter. Fortunately, the vault itself was not breached, meaning no harm came to the building's precious contents. However, the incident has raised questions about whether the building will be able to fulfill its purpose in the long term.