We are currently in Beta version and updating this search on a regular basis. We’d love to hear your feedback here.

  1. ArchDaily
  2. Toyo Ito

Toyo Ito: The Latest Architecture and News

Tokyo Architecture City Guide: 30 Iconic Buildings to Visit in Japan's Capital City

One of the world's leading metropolises, Tokyo is home to extraordinary architecture that fascinates through its blend of traditional values and high-tech expression. The 1923 earthquake and the bombardments of World War II dramatically influenced the image of the city and its architecture, giving rise to modern urban environments with complex infrastructure.

The Japanese capital constitutes the most populated metropolitan area in the world, housing 33 million inhabitants. Divided into 23 wards and numerous neighbourhoods, the city features a diverse blend of atmospheres and urban fabrics that support an amalgamation of architectural typologies.

© Keishin Horikoshi / SS Tokyo© Ken’ichi Suzuki. ImageThe Ariake Gymnastics Centre by Nikken Sekkei + Shimizu Corporation© Nacása & Partners Inc.. ImageMiyashita Park by Nikken Sekkei© Kawasumi Kobayashi Kenji Photograph Office. ImageTokyo Institute of Technology Hisao & Hiroko Taki Plaza by Kengo Kuma & Associates+ 30

Who Has Won the Pritzker Prize?

The Pritzker Prize is the most important award in the field of architecture, awarded to a living architect whose built work "has produced consistent and significant contributions to humanity through the art of architecture." The Prize rewards individuals, not entire offices, as took place in 2000 (when the jury selected Rem Koolhaas instead of his firm OMA) or in 2016 (with Alejandro Aravena selected instead of Elemental); however, the prize can also be awarded to multiple individuals working together, as took place in 2001 (Herzog & de Meuron), 2010 (Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa of SANAA), and 2017 (Rafael Aranda, Carme Pigem, and Ramon Vilalta of RCR Arquitectes).

BIG, OMA, 3xn, Snøhetta and Toyo Ito Compete for the New GOe Building in Spain

Last year, the Basque Culinary Center announced the creation of the GOe: Gastronomy Open Ecosystem. A project that seeks to generate a gastronomic ecosystem focused on research, innovation and entrepreneurship. It will have its own building in San Sebastian, Spain, becoming the new headquarters complementary to the previous BCC building designed by VAUMM in 2011.

With the aim of selecting the best proposals for the construction of the GOe building, an international architectural competition was launched in December 2021. After receiving and analysing different proposals, five finalists were selected to move on to the next phase of the award process: 3xn (Denmark), BIG - Bjarke Ingels Group (Denmark), OMA - Office of Metropolitan Architecture (Netherlands), Snøhetta (Norway) and Toyo Ito & Associates (Japan).

Architects, not Architecture: Toyo Ito

On November 17th, 2021, as a part of the second season of the Virtual World Tour, Architects, not Architecture had the honor to have as guest the 2013 Pritzker Prize Toyo Ito.

We all might be familiar with his works, but how much do we know about his biography and about the vicissitudes that shaped him?

"I Am Always Inside the Architecture that I Design": In Conversation with Toyo Ito

Examining the work of Tokyo architect Toyo Ito (b. 1941) – particularly his now seminal Sendai Mediatheque (1995-2001), Serpentine Gallery (London, 2002, with Cecil Balmond), TOD's Omotesando Building (Tokyo, 2004), Tama Art University Library (Tokyo, 2007), and National Taichung Theater (2009-16) – will immediately become apparent these buildings’ structural innovations and spatial, non-hierarchical organizations. Although these structures all seem to be quite diverse, there is one unifying theme – the architect’s consistent commitment to erasing fixed boundaries between inside and outside and relaxing spatial divisions between various programs within. There is continuity in how these buildings are explored. They are conceived as systems rather than objects and they never really end; one could imagine their formations and patterns to continue to evolve and expand pretty much endlessly.

Tod's Omotesando Building_interior. Image © Nacasa & PartnersSilver Hut. Image Courtesy of Toyo Ito & Associates, ArchitectsSendai Mediatheque. Image Courtesy of Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects'Minna no Mori' Gifu Media Cosmos. Image © Kai Nakamura+ 13

Lost Architecture: Resurrecting the U House by Toyo Ito

The U House is widely regarded as one of the masterpieces of Pritzker Prize winning architect Toyo Ito. It was designed specifically to nurture his sister and two daughters after they lost their father to cancer. Decades later, the house sat empty once the family had eventually moved on from the grips of their grief. In 1997, the house was demolished to clear the site for sale and today the building only lives on in memory, drawing, and images. In this episode of Architecture with Stewart, he reconstructs the U House to simulate what it would have been like to visit in real-life. After a forensic investigation and a close analysis of its program and geometry, he builds a 3D model and navigates it in the real-time render engine Enscape and offers a link for you to explore as well. What hidden treasures are lurking inside this important building lost to the wrecking ball?

Design Miami Unveils Architectural Drawings by 90 International Architects Including Steven Holl, David Chipperfield and David Adjaye

Design Miami’s latest initiative in partnership with Architects for Beirut, has gathered a collection of 100+ original architectural drawings and artworks donated by 90+ renowned architects from around the world. With proceeds going to aid on-the-ground restoration efforts in Beirut, works offered include exclusive pieces from Zaha Hadid, David Chipperfield, Toyo Ito, Steven Holl, Tatiana Bilbao, Adjaye Associates, and Renzo Piano, to name a few.

David Chipperfield_The Weston Bridge Royal Academy of Arts - DCA London. Image Courtesy of Design Miami/Architects for BeirutToyo Ito_Sketch - Yuma Ota. Image Courtesy of Design Miami/Architects for BeirutTatiana Bilbao - Social Topography 1. Image Courtesy of Design Miami/Architects for BeirutWael Al Awar_Hayy Creative Hub- Section 1. Image Courtesy of Design Miami/Architects for Beirut+ 18

Spotlight: Toyo Ito

As one of the leading architects of Japan's increasingly highly-regarded architecture culture, 2013 Pritzker Laureate Toyo Ito (born June 1, 1941) has defined his career by combining elements of minimalism with an embrace of technology, in a way that merges both traditional and contemporary elements of Japanese culture.

Tower of Winds. Image © Tomio OhashiTama Art University Library. Image © Iwan BaanSendai Mediatheque. Image © Nacasa & Partners Inc.Taichung Metropolitan Opera House. Image © Lucas K. Doolan+ 16

Studying the "Manual of Section": Architecture's Most Intriguing Drawing

For Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki and David J. Lewis, the section “is often understood as a reductive drawing type, produced at the end of the design process to depict structural and material conditions in service of the construction contract.” A definition that will be familiar to most of those who have studied or worked in architecture at some point. We often think primarily of the plan, for it allows us to embrace the programmatic expectations of a project and provide a summary of the various functions required. In the modern age, digital modelling software programs offer ever more possibilities when it comes to creating complex three dimensional objects, making the section even more of an afterthought.

With their Manual of Section (2016), the three founding partners of LTL architects engage with section as an essential tool of architectural design, and let’s admit it, this reading might change your mind on the topic. For the co-authors, “thinking and designing through section requires the building of a discourse about section, recognizing it as a site of intervention.” Perhaps, indeed, we need to understand the capabilities of section drawings both to use them more efficiently and to enjoy doing so.

Bagsværd Church by Jørn Utzon (1976). Published in Manual of Section by Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, and David J. Lewis published by Princeton Architectural Press (2016). Image Courtesy of LTL ArchitectsNotre Dame du Haut by Le Corbusier (1954). Published in Manual of Section by Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, and David J. Lewis published by Princeton Architectural Press (2016). Image Courtesy of LTL ArchitectsUnited States Pavilion at Expo '67 by Buckminster Fuller and Shoji Sadao (1967). Published in Manual of Section by Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, and David J. Lewis published by Princeton Architectural Press (2016). Image Courtesy of LTL ArchitectsThe Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum by Frank Lloyd Wright (1959). Published in Manual of Section by Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, and David J. Lewis published by Princeton Architectural Press (2016). Image Courtesy of LTL Architects+ 15

Toyo Ito and Rafael Moneo Design Silk Carpets for Phillips Auction House

Unique carpet designs by the two visionary architects will be offered at 20th Century & Contemporary Phillips Art Day Sale in London today, on June 28th.

Pritzker Prize-winning architects Toyo Ito and Rafael Moneo have been invited to design silk carpets, inspired by the Golden Ratio as a part of the eponymous project by an auction house Phillips and ARTinD (Art in Design) — a London-based cooperative that seeks to foster greater synergy between art, architecture, and design.

Life after Serpentine: Second Lives of Architecture's Famed Pavilions

If the surest sign of summer in London is the appearance of a new pavilion in front of the Serpentine Gallery, then it’s perhaps fair to say that summer is over once the pavilion is taken down. The installations have gained prominence since its inaugural edition in 2000, acting as a kind of exclusive honor and indication of talent for those chosen to present; celebrated names from the past names include Zaha Hadid, Rem Koolhaas, and Olafur Eliasson.

Serpentine Pavilion 2015 / Selgas Cano. Image © Iwan BaanSerpentine Pavilion 2014 / Smiljan Radic. Image © Iwan BaanSerpentine Pavilion 2006 / Rem Koolhaas. Image © John OffenbachSerpentine Pavilion 2007 / Olafur Eliasson, Kjetil Thorsen, Cecil Balmond. Image © Luke Hayes+ 20

Round-Up: The Serpentine Pavilion Through the Years

Lasting for close to two decades now, the annual Serpentine Gallery Pavilion Exhibition has become one of the most anticipated architectural events in London and for the global architecture community. Each of the previous eighteen pavilions have been thought-provoking, leaving an indelible mark and strong message to the architectural community. And even though each of the past pavilions are removed from the site after their short summer stints to occupy far-flung private estates, they continue to be shared through photographs, and in architectural lectures. With the launch of the 18th Pavilion, we take a look back at all the previous pavilions and their significance to the architecturally-minded public.

Serpentine Pavilion 2013. Image © Neil MacWilliamsSerpentine Pavilion 2000. Image © Helene BinetSerpentine Pavilion 2006. Image © John OffenbachSerpentine Pavilion 2015. Image © Iwan Baan+ 38

Shelter International Architectural Design Competition for Students 2018

The “Home-for-All” is a project that is built upon the premise of “thinking together and creating together” with the community. It is an architectural manner that goes further than simply supporting the people affected by the disaster to question the most fundamental meaning of the future of public architecture. I would like students to present proposals that build from and go beyond the concept of “Home-for-All” from a perspective that takes into consideration of people living in our society today. - Toyo Ito

Explore These Architecturally Innovative Bookcases

At first, books were kept in chests but as they became published in bulk they moved into the cupboard. The doors came off and the bookcase began to evolve. Today, bookcases can be integral architectural elements that shape space and, in some cases, even light. In celebration of International Day of the Book on April 23rd, ArchDaily compiled this round-up of architecturally, innovative bookcases.

Scroll down to see inventive architectural book storage from Alberto Kalach, ARCHSTUDIO, Toyo Ito, and more.

Courtesy of Alberto Kalach© Tsukui Teruaki© Dirk Weiblen© Jaime Navarro+ 17

The Stories Behind 7 of the Most Iconic Eyeglasses in Architecture

Eyeglasses: the quintessential accessory of the architect. They are mini pieces of architecture you can wear, and an outward expression of your inner persona. Whether they be square, round, or wire-frame, black, white, tortoiseshell, or bright neon tones, they represent our visionary ideals. As such, many of the most iconic spectacles have an interesting history behind them; so here are the stories behind seven of the most recognizable eyeglasses in the architecture world.

Toyo Ito Announced as Winner of UIA Gold Medal for Lifetime Achievement

The UIA (International Union of Architects) has announced the winners of the 2017 UIA Gold Medal and Prizes. Established in 1961, the UIA Prizes are awarded every 3 years to “honour professionals whose qualities, talents, and actions have had an international impact on the diverse sectors of architectural practice.” This year, a total of 46 nominations were considered by the Secretariat.

The Complex Yet Simple Geometry of Toyo Ito's Tama Art University Library

In his latest video, filmmaker Vincent Hecht takes us inside Toyo Ito's Tama Art University Library. The project is notable for its effortless geometry, with the entire building comprising a series of simple concrete arches which, when combined, create a complex "emergent grid" which allowed for great flexibility in the building's plan. Hecht's video shows how this geometry works in practice, as the elements of the library snake through the building's light, open interior.

How Architects Realized the Curving, Twisted, Slanted Walls in Toyo Ito's Mexican Museum

This article is part of our 'Innovative Materials' series where we ask architects about the creative process behind choosing the materials they use in their work.

The Museo Internacional del Barroco (International Baroque Museum) by Toyo Ito is located 7km from Puebla, Mexico. The place is noted for its easy access, not only for cars, but also for being connected to a network of bike paths and public transport. In this interview we spoke with Alejandro Bribiesca Ortega and Miriam Carrada.