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Toyo Ito

Life after Serpentine: Second Lives of Architecture's Famed Pavilions

09:30 - 18 October, 2018
Life after Serpentine: Second Lives of Architecture's Famed Pavilions, Serpentine Pavilion 2016 / Bjarke Ingels. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Serpentine Pavilion 2016 / Bjarke Ingels. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

If the surest sign of summer in London is the appearance of a new pavilion in front of the Serpentine Gallery, then it’s perhaps fair to say that summer is over once the pavilion is taken down. The installations have gained prominence since its inaugural edition in 2000, acting as a kind of exclusive honor and indication of talent for those chosen to present; celebrated names from the past names include Zaha Hadid, Rem Koolhaas, and Olafur Eliasson.

Serpentine Pavilion 2015 / Selgas Cano. Image © Iwan Baan Serpentine Pavilion 2014 / Smiljan Radic. Image © Iwan Baan Serpentine Pavilion 2006 / Rem Koolhaas. Image © John Offenbach Serpentine Pavilion 2007 / Olafur Eliasson, Kjetil Thorsen, Cecil Balmond. Image © Luke Hayes + 20

Round-Up: The Serpentine Pavilion Through the Years

14:00 - 11 June, 2018
Round-Up: The Serpentine Pavilion Through the Years

Lasting for close to two decades now, the annual Serpentine Gallery Pavilion Exhibition has become one of the most anticipated architectural events in London and for the global architecture community. Each of the previous eighteen pavilions have been thought-provoking, leaving an indelible mark and strong message to the architectural community. And even though each of the past pavilions are removed from the site after their short summer stints to occupy far-flung private estates, they continue to be shared through photographs, and in architectural lectures. With the launch of the 18th Pavilion, we take a look back at all the previous pavilions and their significance to the architecturally-minded public.

Serpentine Pavilion 2013. Image © Neil MacWilliams Serpentine Pavilion 2000. Image © Helene Binet Serpentine Pavilion 2006. Image © John Offenbach Serpentine Pavilion 2015. Image © Iwan Baan + 38

Spotlight: Toyo Ito

01:00 - 1 June, 2018
Spotlight: Toyo Ito, Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2002 / Toyo Ito + Cecil Balmond + Arup. Image © Sylvain Deleu
Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2002 / Toyo Ito + Cecil Balmond + Arup. Image © Sylvain Deleu

As one of the leading architects of Japan's increasingly highly-regarded architecture culture, 2013 Pritzker Laureate Toyo Ito (born June 1, 1941) has defined his career by combining elements of minimalism with an embrace of technology, in a way that merges both traditional and contemporary elements of Japanese culture.

Tower of Winds. Image © Tomio Ohashi Tama Art University Library. Image © Iwan Baan Sendai Mediatheque. Image © Nacasa & Partners Inc. Taichung Metropolitan Opera House. Image © Lucas K. Doolan + 16

Shelter International Architectural Design Competition for Students 2018

18:00 - 18 May, 2018
Shelter International Architectural Design Competition for Students 2018, Shelter International Architectural Design Competition for Students 2018
Shelter International Architectural Design Competition for Students 2018

The “Home-for-All” is a project that is built upon the premise of “thinking together and creating together” with the community. It is an architectural manner that goes further than simply supporting the people affected by the disaster to question the most fundamental meaning of the future of public architecture. I would like students to present proposals that build from and go beyond the concept of “Home-for-All” from a perspective that takes into consideration of people living in our society today. - Toyo Ito

Explore These Architecturally Innovative Bookcases

06:00 - 23 April, 2018
Explore These Architecturally Innovative Bookcases, © Ossip van Duivenbode
© Ossip van Duivenbode

At first, books were kept in chests but as they became published in bulk they moved into the cupboard. The doors came off and the bookcase began to evolve. Today, bookcases can be integral architectural elements that shape space and, in some cases, even light. In celebration of International Day of the Book on April 23rd, ArchDaily compiled this round-up of architecturally, innovative bookcases.

Scroll down to see inventive architectural book storage from Alberto Kalach, ARCHSTUDIO, Toyo Ito, and more.

Courtesy of Alberto Kalach © Tsukui Teruaki © Dirk Weiblen © Jaime Navarro + 17

Who Has Won the Pritzker Prize?

08:00 - 25 February, 2018
Who Has Won the Pritzker Prize?, Pritzker Prize 2017 Ceremony: Ryue Nishizawa, Tadao Ando, Kazuyo Sejima, Rafael Aranda, Glenn Murcutt, Carme Pigem, Ramon Vilalta, Toyo Ito, Shigeru Ban. Image © The Hyatt Foundation / Pritzker Architecture Prize
Pritzker Prize 2017 Ceremony: Ryue Nishizawa, Tadao Ando, Kazuyo Sejima, Rafael Aranda, Glenn Murcutt, Carme Pigem, Ramon Vilalta, Toyo Ito, Shigeru Ban. Image © The Hyatt Foundation / Pritzker Architecture Prize

The Pritzker Prize is the most important award in the field of architecture, awarded to a living architect whose built work "has produced consistent and significant contributions to humanity through the art of architecture." The Prize rewards individuals, not entire offices, as took place in 2000 (when the jury selected Rem Koolhaas instead of his firm OMA) or in 2016 (with Alejandro Aravena selected instead of Elemental); however, the prize can also be awarded to multiple individuals working together, as took place in 2001 (Herzog & de Meuron), 2010 (Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa of SANAA), and 2017 (Rafael Aranda, Carme Pigem, and Ramon Vilalta of RCR Arquitectes).

The award is an initiative funded by Jay Pritzker through the Hyatt Foundation, an organization associated with the hotel company of the same name that Jay founded with his brother Donald in 1957. The award was first given in 1979, when the American architect Philip Johnson, was awarded for his iconic works such as the Glass House in New Canaan, Connecticut.

The Pritzker Prize has been awarded for almost forty straight years without interruption, and there are now 18 countries with at least one winning architect. To date, half of the winners are European; while the Americas, Asia, and Oceania share the other twenty editions. So far, no African architect has been awarded, making it the only continent without a winner.

The Stories Behind 7 of the Most Iconic Eyeglasses in Architecture

09:30 - 11 December, 2017
The Stories Behind 7 of the Most Iconic Eyeglasses in Architecture

Eyeglasses: the quintessential accessory of the architect. They are mini pieces of architecture you can wear, and an outward expression of your inner persona. Whether they be square, round, or wire-frame, black, white, tortoiseshell, or bright neon tones, they represent our visionary ideals. As such, many of the most iconic spectacles have an interesting history behind them; so here are the stories behind seven of the most recognizable eyeglasses in the architecture world.

Toyo Ito Announced as Winner of UIA Gold Medal for Lifetime Achievement

12:00 - 26 July, 2017
Toyo Ito Announced as Winner of UIA Gold Medal for Lifetime Achievement, Tama Art University Library / Toyo Ito & Associates. Image © Iwan Baan
Tama Art University Library / Toyo Ito & Associates. Image © Iwan Baan

The UIA (International Union of Architects) has announced the winners of the 2017 UIA Gold Medal and Prizes. Established in 1961, the UIA Prizes are awarded every 3 years to “honour professionals whose qualities, talents, and actions have had an international impact on the diverse sectors of architectural practice.” This year, a total of 46 nominations were considered by the Secretariat.

The Complex Yet Simple Geometry of Toyo Ito's Tama Art University Library

16:00 - 4 July, 2017

In his latest video, filmmaker Vincent Hecht takes us inside Toyo Ito's Tama Art University Library. The project is notable for its effortless geometry, with the entire building comprising a series of simple concrete arches which, when combined, create a complex "emergent grid" which allowed for great flexibility in the building's plan. Hecht's video shows how this geometry works in practice, as the elements of the library snake through the building's light, open interior.

How Architects Realized the Curving, Twisted, Slanted Walls in Toyo Ito's Mexican Museum

07:00 - 17 February, 2017
How Architects Realized the Curving, Twisted, Slanted Walls in Toyo Ito's Mexican Museum, © Patrick Lopez Jaimes / Danstek
© Patrick Lopez Jaimes / Danstek

This article is part of our 'Innovative Materials' series where we ask architects about the creative process behind choosing the materials they use in their work.

The Museo Internacional del Barroco (International Baroque Museum) by Toyo Ito is located 7km from Puebla, Mexico. The place is noted for its easy access, not only for cars, but also for being connected to a network of bike paths and public transport. In this interview we spoke with Alejandro Bribiesca Ortega and Miriam Carrada.

"Misunderstandings" at CAMPO and FRAC

09:30 - 15 December, 2016
"Misunderstandings" at CAMPO and FRAC, Misunderstandings at Campo gallery
Misunderstandings at Campo gallery

The encounter between CAMPO and Le FRAC Centre-Val de Loire of Orleans produced MISUNDERSTANDINGS, a project which, addressing one of the most important archives of architectural experiments worldwide, opens a reflection on the operative value of museums and collections for the contemporary discourse and practice of architecture.

How Toyo Ito is Embarking on a "New Career Epoch" With Small-Scale Community Architecture

09:30 - 18 November, 2016
How Toyo Ito is Embarking on a "New Career Epoch" With Small-Scale Community Architecture, Steel Hut, Toyo Ito Museum of Architecture in Omishima, Japan. Image © Daici Ano
Steel Hut, Toyo Ito Museum of Architecture in Omishima, Japan. Image © Daici Ano

This article was originally published on Autodesk's Redshift publication as "Toyo Ito’s Next Architectural Feat: Revitalizing Omishima Island in Japan."

Last year, as construction at his National Taichung Theater in Taiwan was winding down, Toyo Ito found himself at a crossroads.

A 10-year project in the making, the gargantuan cultural beacon is made of biomorphically curved concrete walls that wind together like a knot of arteries, creating an otherworldly experience for arts patrons. It’s every bit the landmark project you’d expect from 2013’s Pritzker Prize Laureate, but its rapidly approaching completion triggered a vital question: Where to go from here?

Toyo Ito's Taichung Metropolitan Opera House Photographed by Lucas K Doolan

10:07 - 30 September, 2016
Toyo Ito's Taichung Metropolitan Opera House Photographed by Lucas K Doolan, © Lucas K. Doolan
© Lucas K. Doolan

Designed in 2006, and under construction since 2009, Toyo Ito & Associates much anticipated Taichung Metropolitan Opera House has finally officially opened. The design is notable for its cavernous, curved and folded interior forms, which produce a dramatic and complex section that is neatly resolved into a rectilinear exterior form. Taiwan-based photographer Lucas K Doolan visited the new Opera House to study its impressive internal spaces and its presence in the surrounding urban environment.

© Lucas K. Doolan © Lucas K. Doolan © Lucas K. Doolan © Lucas K. Doolan + 51

Studying the "Manual of Section": Architecture's Most Intriguing Drawing

08:30 - 18 August, 2016
Studying the "Manual of Section": Architecture's Most Intriguing Drawing, Phillips Exeter Academy Library by Louis I. Kahn (1972). Published in Manual of Section by Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, and David J. Lewis published by Princeton Architectural Press (2016). Image © LTL Architects
Phillips Exeter Academy Library by Louis I. Kahn (1972). Published in Manual of Section by Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, and David J. Lewis published by Princeton Architectural Press (2016). Image © LTL Architects

For Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki and David J. Lewis, the section “is often understood as a reductive drawing type, produced at the end of the design process to depict structural and material conditions in service of the construction contract.” A definition that will be familiar to most of those who have studied or worked in architecture at some point. We often think primarily of the plan, for it allows us to embrace the programmatic expectations of a project and provide a summary of the various functions required. In the modern age, digital modelling software programs offer ever more possibilities when it comes to creating complex three dimensional objects, making the section even more of an afterthought.

With their Manual of Section, the three founding partners of LTL architects engage with section as an essential tool of architectural design, and let’s admit it, this reading might change your mind on the topic. For the co-authors, “thinking and designing through section requires the building of a discourse about section, recognizing it as a site of intervention.” Perhaps, indeed, we need to understand the capabilities of section drawings both to use them more efficiently and to enjoy doing so.

Bagsværd Church by Jørn Utzon (1976). Published in Manual of Section by Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, and David J. Lewis published by Princeton Architectural Press (2016). Image © LTL Architects Notre Dame du Haut by Le Corbusier (1954). Published in Manual of Section by Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, and David J. Lewis published by Princeton Architectural Press (2016). Image © LTL Architects United States Pavilion at Expo '67 by Buckminster Fuller and Shoji Sadao (1967). Published in Manual of Section by Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, and David J. Lewis published by Princeton Architectural Press (2016). Image © LTL Architects The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum by Frank Lloyd Wright (1959). Published in Manual of Section by Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, and David J. Lewis published by Princeton Architectural Press (2016). Image © LTL Architects + 15

Between Generic Interventions and Architecture of Relations: A Journey Through Coastal Japan

04:00 - 28 June, 2016
Between Generic Interventions and Architecture of Relations: A Journey Through Coastal Japan, Tetra Pod / Omoe Miyako, Iwate Prefecture. Image © Max Creasy
Tetra Pod / Omoe Miyako, Iwate Prefecture. Image © Max Creasy

In this article, written by Christian Dimmer and illustrated with photographs by Max Creasy, the post-earthquake and tsunami coastal architectural landscape of the Japanese Prefectures of Aomori, Iwate and Miyagi are presented and studied.

Few disasters were as complex and their implications as hard to grasp as the compound calamity of earthquake, tsunami, nuclear meltdown that hit the North-East of Japan on March 11, 2011. While over 500 kilometers of coastline were devastated, the disaster unfolded in each of the hundreds of towns affected differently depending on local topographies, urban morphologies, existing landscape formations, collective memory of past disasters and preparedness, and the social ties within the communities.

Ritsumeikan University / Munemoto Lab + Shinsaku Munemoto Architects & Associates. Community and meeting space for adjacent temporary housing units, designed and built by Ritsumeikan University student volunteers and members of the local community. Image © Max Creasy N Village / Zai Shirakawa Architects. Otsuchicho Namiita Coast. Image © Max Creasy Interior: Ritsumeikan University Munemoto Lab  + Shinsaku Munemoto Architects & Associates. Image © Max Creasy Irony Stations, MotoYoshiChoo (Miyagi Prefecture) / Hirokazu Tohki, Shiga University. New, highly designed filling station that replaces a more simple facility. In addition, the building will function as a roadside market and community shop. Image © Max Creasy + 19

Video: Gifu Media Cosmos by Toyo Ito

06:00 - 19 April, 2016

The latest video in French architect and filmmaker Vincent Hecht’s Japanese Collection series features the Gifu Media Cosmos by Toyo Ito. The library/gallery features an undulating wooden ceiling and multiple large, suspended translucent funnels that define areas for different activities. A series of intermittent openings in the roof allows natural light into the space.

Toyo Ito Designs New Mayuhana Lamp for Yamagiwa

12:00 - 8 March, 2016
Toyo Ito Designs New Mayuhana Lamp for Yamagiwa, Courtesy of Yamagiwa
Courtesy of Yamagiwa

Yamagiwa has just released a new version of Toyo Ito's popular Mayuhana lamp - Mayuhana Ma Black. "Ma," meaning "true" or "genuine," represents the new lamps darker color that is, as the company describes, "more deep and profound."

"Mayuhana Ma Black is light in darkness. It is the quintessential quality of light found in Japan that reminds me of ‘In Praise of Shadows’ by Junichiro Tanizaki," says Toyo Ito.

A Conversation with Toyo Ito, Kazuyo Sejima, Sou Fujimoto, Akihisa Hirata and Junya Ishigami

16:00 - 2 March, 2016
A Conversation with Toyo Ito, Kazuyo Sejima, Sou Fujimoto, Akihisa Hirata and Junya Ishigami

Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation (GSAPP) hosts a conversation among five of the most influential contemporary Japanese architects: Toyo Ito, Kazuyo Sejima, Sou Fujimoto, Akihisa Hirata and Junya Ishigami. Moderated by Columbia GSAPP professors Jeffrey Inaba and Kenneth Frampton, the conversation aims to explore the relationships and creative exchanges among this prominent group of architects and designers.