Spotlight: Fumihiko Maki

at MIT Media Lab, 2010

Fumihiko Maki, the Pritzker Prize laureate and 67th AIA Gold Medalist, turns 86 today. Widely considered to be one of Japan’s most distinguished living architects, Maki practices a unique style of Modernism that reflects his Japanese origin. Toshiko Mori has praised Maki’s ability to create “ineffable atmospheres” using a simple palette of various types of metal, concrete, and glass. His consistent integration and adoption of new methods of construction as part of his design language contribute to his personal quest to create “unforgettable scenes.”

Tokyo’s Modernist Gem, Hotel Okura, To Be Demolished

Courtesy of Wikipedia

Talk about Modernist Japanese architecture, and you can hardly fail to bring up Tokyo‘s Hotel Okura. Built in 1962 under the design direction of Yoshiro Taniguchi, Hideo Kosaka, Shiko Munakata, and Kenkichi Tomimoto, the hotel has long been a landmark not only for the city, but for Japan. Now, however, the hotel’s owners have decided that the main building for the hotel will be demolished in September of 2015, with a new hotel taking its place. To learn more – including how to sign the for preservation – keep reading after the break.

Zaha Hadid Architects Reveals Modified Tokyo National Stadium Designs

The updated design for the Tokyo National Stadium. Image Courtesy of Japan Sport Council

Update: The Japan Sport Council has now unveiled images of ZHA’s redesigned Tokyo National Stadium, which say will make “make the stadium even more efficient, user-focussed, adaptable and sustainable.” The capacity of the stadium will remain at 80,000 seats.

After sustained protest from Japanese architects and citizens alike, Zaha Hadid Architects have confessed that they are modifying their designs for Tokyo’s National Stadium, the centerpiece for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. After repeated criticism, including a petition launched by Pritzker laureates Toyo Ito and Fumihiko Maki, the Japanese Government had already announced a plan to reduce the cost from its original budget of $3 billion to a more manageable $1.7 billion.

Now, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) has added fuel to the fire by saying that it would support a scaled-back plan for the entire event: “We want to see more existing venues, we want to see the use of more temporary grandstands,” said Committee vice president John Coates.

More on Tokyo’s plan to dial down its Olympics after the break

Shigeru Ban Designs Temporary Pavilion for the World Cup

© Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP

In honor of the World Cup (which starts today), the Brazilian Embassy in , Japan, has invited Shigeru Ban, this year’s Pritzker Laureate, to build a temporary pavilion.

Located at the entrance of the embassy, the three foot tall, 120 m² temporary structure will be a place where people can meet after the games since, due to the time difference, the games will not be broadcast on site.

House K / Yuji Kimura Design

© Takumi Ota

Architects: Yuji Kimura Design
Location: Tokyo,
Area: 47 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Takumi Ota

Happy Birthday, Toyo Ito!

© Yoshiaki Tsutsui

Pritzker Laureate Toyo Ito (June 1, 1941) turns 73 today. Renowned for flexible spaces that appeal to the human senses, Ito draws inspiration from the organic forms of nature, prioritizing fluidity between the natural world and the built form in his designs. Ito’s oeuvre defies definition; each of his many works, from the Odate Dome to White U to his masterwork Sendai Mediatheque, is extremely unique. We invite you to explore the The Life and Work of Toyo Ito.

Shugoin / Love Architecture

© Katsuhisa Kida

Architects: Love Architecture
Location: Tokyo,
Architect In Charge: Yukio Asari
Area: 514 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Katsuhisa Kida

Japanese Architect Launches Second Petition Against Zaha Hadid’s Tokyo Stadium

© ZHA

Tokyo-based architect Edward Suzuki has launched another petition against Zaha Hadid‘s design for the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Stadium, claiming it is “overwhelmingly large for the context” and ”will desecrate the ‘sacred grounds’ of Meiji Shrine Outer Gardens”. This is the second petition against the design and is intended to support the earlier petition by Toyo Ito and Fumihiko Maki by providing an equivalent targeted primarily at English speakers, aiming to “pressure our government not only from within but also from outside of our country.” You can see the petition in full here.

Video: Shibaura House by Kazuyo Sejima

As a part of his ongoing film series about Japanese architecture, French architect and filmmaker Vincent Hecht has created this visual exploration of Kazuyo Sejima’s Shibaura House. Completed in 2011, this five story office space is walled almost entirely in glass and features double-height, split level floors that showcase the paths of travel through the building. The building also features a public cafe on the ground floor, and a roof terrace.

Toyo Ito and Fumihiko Maki Petition Against Zaha Hadid’s Tokyo Olympic Stadium

© ZHA

Though it seemed a compromise was met last October, when Japan’s minister of education, Hakubun Shimomura announced plans to reduce the cost and scale of the Zaha Hadid-designed Tokyo Olympic Stadium, the debate rages on.  

Pritzker laureates and have launched an online petition to “defend the ginko tree-lined landscape of blue sky and Jingu Outer Gardens” from the construction of Hadid’s “oversized” stadium. 

The petition (now with more than 13,000 signatures) urges the Japan Sports Council, who hand selected Hadid’s winning design alongside Tadao Ando, to reconsider upgrading the existing Meiji Jingo Gaien Stadium and the gardens surrounding it. This solution, they believe, is a more affordable and sustainable alternative that would prevent the relocation of nearby residents. 

Take a tour though Zaha Hadid’s 2020 Olympic Stadium and share your thoughts about the design (and petition), after the break…

Terunobu Fujimori’s Soft-Hard Zinc House Opens Near Tokyo

Soft-hard looking zinc house. Image © Maria Novozhilova

A new private house designed by an exceptional Japanese architect, , has opened. The new building is located in a small provincial town near to Tokyo. Neighbored by typical one-family residences, the newcomer comes to the fore. Different, shiny and apparently soft metallic façade catches the visitor’s eye. 

Yet the scale of the building is much smaller than one might expect. Every height, width and depth are accurately measured and left from a certain point of view spatially stingy: no waste is admissible here.

@ArchDaily Instatour: #Tokyo

Sunny Hills by Kengo Kuma via @archdaily on

We recently went to during the Sakura to visit the city’s incredible architecture: from Metabolist towers and the work of Pritzker laureates to the buildings of the new generation of Japanese architects. See the 27 photos we snapped after the break.

Also, leave your suggestions for our next Instatour in the comments below, and be sure to follow @ArchDaily on Instagram to travel with us through the world of architecture! Next destination: #Venice.

Video: SunnyHills at Minami-Aoyama by Kengo Kuma

As a part of his ongoing film series about Japanese architecture, French architect and filmmaker Vincent Hecht has created this visual exploration of SunnyHills at Minami-Aoyama by Kengo Kuma.  Designed to resemble a bamboo basket, this pineapple cake shop is built using the traditional Japanese joint technique of “Jiigoku-Gumi.”  The wooden latticework is meant to provide visual contrast with the concrete facades of the building’s neighbors.

The Pool Aoyama / Nobuo Araki

© Atsushi Fuseya

Architects: Nobuo Araki
Location: Tokyo,
Architect In Charge: / The Archetype
Area: 161 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Atsushi Fuseya, Kai Hiroyo

Switch Residence / APOLLO Architects & Associates

© Masao Nishikawa

Architects: APOLLO Architects & Associates
Location: ,
Architect In Charge: Satoshi Kurosaki
Area: 123 sqm
Year: 2006
Photographs: Masao Nishikawa

Cave Residence / APOLLO Architects & Associates

© Masao Nishikawa

Architects: APOLLO Architects & Associates
Location: Tokyo, Japan
Architect In Charge: Satoshi Kurosaki
Area: 129 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Masao Nishikawa

House in Daizawa / Nobuo Araki

© Shimizu Ken

Architects: Nobuo Araki
Location: Tokyo,
Area: 66 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Shimizu Ken

Calm / APOLLO Architects & Associates

© Masao Nishikawa

Architects: APOLLO Architects & Associates
Location: Tokyo,
Architect In Charge: Satoshi Kurosaki
Area: 88 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Masao Nishikawa