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  2. Religious Architecture

Religious Architecture: The Latest Architecture and News

Henning Larsen Designs New Church in Højvangen, Denmark, the First to be Built in Skanderborg Parish in Over 500 years

Henning Larsen has won a competition to design Højvangen Church, the first church to be built in Skanderborg Parish in over 500 years. The new intervention, set to be completed and inaugurated by December 2024, will be a new public gathering point in the growing residential area of Højvangen in Skanderborg, Denmark.

Udan Crematorium / d6thD design studio

© Inclined Studio© Inclined Studio© Inclined Studio© Inclined Studio+ 19

  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  1000
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2020
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: AutoDesk, Jaquar, Adobe, Asian Paints, Daksh Prajapati, +2

St George Orthodox Church / Wallmakers

© Jino Sam© Jino Sam© Jino Sam© Jino Sam+ 15

Kochi, India
  • Architects: Wallmakers
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  221
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2016

Abijo Mosque / Patrickwaheed Design Consultancy

© Mujib Ojeifo© Mujib Ojeifo© Rubyspolaroid© Rubyspolaroid+ 28

  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  700
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2020
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: Aylum Aluminum, CDK Integrated Industries, PWDC

Europe's Brutalist Churches and Chapels, by Stefano Perego

Parochial Church of the Resurrection of Christ, by architects Günther Domenig and Eilfried Huth. Oberwart, Austria. (1966-1969). Image © Stefano PeregoNational Temple of Mary, Mother and Queen, also known as the Monte Grisa Sanctuary, by architect Antonio Guacci. Trieste, Italy (1963-1965). Image © Stefano PeregoCathedral of Saint Buenaventura, by architect Miroslav Matasović. Banja Luka, Bosnia and Herzegovina (1972-1973). The clock tower was added between 1990-1991. Image © Stefano PeregoCathedral of Christ the King, by architects Adalberto Libera and Cesare Galeazzi. La Spezia, Italy (1956-1975). Image © Stefano Perego+ 22

Rich in symbolism and tradition, religious architecture has always been marked by the grandiosity and extravagance of its interior spaces. For the architects and designers who created these spaces, everything from the scale, to the materials, to the lighting were tools to be used in optimizing their form and function and creating a place for users to connect with their faith.

Crematorium Baumschulenweg / Shultes Frank Architeckten

© Mattias Hamrén© Mattias Hamrén© Mattias Hamrén© Mattias Hamrén+ 19

Berlin, Germany

Architecture Classic: al-Nouri Mosque / Nur ad-Din Zangi

Islamic architecture has been perhaps one of the most culturally significant typologies throughout history. Not only do the buildings themselves serve as centers for community and social services, but their designs reflect Muslim beliefs and morals, and reveal the rich history of nations in the Middle East.

Minaret. East View in 1930s. Image © World Monuments Fund CollectionMan seated before the Mihrab in the prayer hall, after reconstruction in 1944. Image © General Authority of AntiquitiesDestroyed Post-War Mosque. Image © UNESCO3D Model of Mosque Today. Image © UNESCO+ 19

Exploring Multifaith Spaces with Eric Salitsky

Wednesday, 5/13, 1pm - 2pm EST

Price
Member: Free
General Public: $10
Student with Valid .edu Email Address: Free

1.0 LU / 1.0 HSW

*This event is occurring as a live webinar. Registrants will be emailed a link to access the program; please continue to register.*

In this webinar, Eric Salitsky will present his 2018 Stewardson Keefe LeBrun Travel Grant research, Exploring the Global Phenomenon of Multifaith Spaces. Most commonly found in airports, hospitals, and university campuses, multifaith spaces also exist in military bases, prisons, malls, stadiums, museums, and as stand-alone institutions. Salitsky traveled to over 50 of these spaces in New York, Boston, London, Manchester, Zurich,

Resurrection Parish Complex / TAMassociati

© Andrea Avezzù© Andrea Avezzù© Andrea Avezzù© Andrea Avezzù+ 24

Viareggio, Italy
  • Architects: TAMassociati
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  1682
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2019
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: Lapitec®, C & C Costruzioni, Co.Ge. Consorzio Generale Edile, Comed Toscomeccanica, Coperture Toscana, +21

Immanuel Church / Sauerbruch Hutton

© Thomas Mayer
© Thomas Mayer
Cologne, Germany
  • Architects: Sauerbruch Hutton
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  880
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2013
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: Gutmann, Vanceva

© Thomas Mayer© Thomas Mayer© Thomas Mayer© Thomas Mayer+ 14

Jesuit High School Chapel of the North American Martyr / Hodgetts + Fung

© Joe Fletcher         © Joe Fletcher         © Joe Fletcher         © Joe Fletcher         + 28

Carmichael, United States

Restoration of Abandoned Church Connects Man, Nature, and God

Changtteul Church, is an old place of worship in Gyeonggi-do, South Korea, that gets its name from the term "changtteul", meaning "a frame containing a window", in Korean. As its name suggests, the building's character lies in its series of windows, giving the visitors both outside and inside a unique experience of light and scenery.

Designers Hanyoung Jang and Hanjin Jang of studio minorormajor utilized the windows of Changtteul as a metaphorical motif for their design concept: the first being the 'window between man and God', and the second being ‘the window between man and nature’, immersing the abandoned religious facility with dramatic experiences.

© studio minorormajor© studio minorormajor© studio minorormajor© studio minorormajor+ 20

Ecumenical Chapel / BNKR

© Jaime Navarro © Jaime Navarro © Jaime Navarro © Jaime Navarro + 14

Cuernavaca, Mexico
  • Architects: BNKR
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  170
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2013

Fundamental Approach Architects Win First Prize for Unconventional Mosque and Plaza Design

© Fundamental Approach Architects / FAA© Fundamental Approach Architects / FAA© Fundamental Approach Architects / FAA© Fundamental Approach Architects / FAA+ 16

Persian architecture studio Fundamental Approach Architects have won first prize in the Golshahr Mosque and Plaza National Design Competition in Iran, proposing an atypical mosque design for the city of Karaj.

The winning proposal bypasses traditional mosque designs, blurring the lines between the contemporary structure, the city, and the surrounding landscape.

Rethinking Sacred Spaces for New Purposes

In the wake of the recent fires at Paris’ Notre Dame and the Al-Aqsa mosque in Jerusalem, we have seen many architects propose new ways of rebuilding these sacred spaces, opening them up to new possibilities.

Historically, after the decline of the Catholic Church and the increasing loss of faith in several locations in Europe and in North America, the maintenance costs and the disuse of sacred spaces has led to the eventual abandonment of churches, shrines and monasteries with great architectural and historical value.

This opens a new opportunity for investors and architects to rescue and re-contextualize the historical heritage of these buildings. Below we present 15 examples of adaptive reuse in ancient churches--transformed into hotels, homes, museums, libraries and other cultural spaces.

Courtesy of Evolution Design© David ZarzosoCourtesy of Thomas Balaban Architect© Flos&Beeldpunt+ 16

When Sunlight Meets Tadao Ando’s Concrete

Koshino House, Ashiya-shi / Japan. Image © Kazunori FujimotoChurch of the Light, Osaka / Japan. Image © Naoya FujiiModern Art Museum, Fort Worth / USA. Image © Todd Landry PhotographyScreenshot of video of Hill of the Buddha at the Makomanai Takino Cemetery, Sapporo / Japan. Image © Hokkaido Fan Magazine+ 8

If there is any consistent factor in his work, says Pritzker-winning architect Tadao Ando, then it is the pursuit of light. Ando’s complex choreography of light fascinates most when the viewer experiences the sensitive transitions within his architecture. Sometimes walls wait calmly for the moment to reveal striking shadow patterns, and other times water reflections animate unobtrusively solid surfaces. His combination of traditional Japanese architecture with a vocabulary of modernism has contributed greatly to critical regionalism. While he is concerned with individual solutions that have a respect for local sites and contexts Ando’s famous buildings – such as the Church of the Light, Koshino House or the Water Temple – link the notion of regional identity with a modern imagining of space, material and light. Shoji walls with diffuse light are reinterpreted in the context of another culture, for instance, filtered through the lens of Rome’s ancient Pantheon, where daylight floods through an oculus. Ando’s masterly imagination culminates in planning spatial sequences of light and dark like he envisioned for the Fondation d’Art Contemporain François Pinault in Paris.