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New York City: The Latest Architecture and News

OMA / Shohei Shigematsu to Reimagine Sotheby’s New York Headquarters

09:00 - 22 February, 2019
OMA / Shohei Shigematsu to Reimagine Sotheby’s New York Headquarters, © OMA New York
© OMA New York

Renowned auction house Sotheby’s has unveiled a dramatic OMA/Shohei Shigematsu-designed expansion and re-imagination of their New York City headquarters. Together with OMA Associate Christy Cheng, Shigematsu has redesigned the headquarters to include vast new exhibition galleries for fine art, precious objects, luxury goods, and more. Comprising 40 galleries of varying size across four floors, the new space will increase Sotheby’s exhibition space from 67,000 square feet to 90,000 square feet.

In the proposal, nine galleries will facilitate discreet private sales for dedicated small objects such as watches and jewelry. Three two-story spaces will be set aside for exhibitions, along with a 150-foot-long space for full collections, according to The New York Times. The new space will include “dynamic repertoire” of "spatial conditions", including a white cube, double height, enfilade, corridor cascade, octagonal, and an L-shaped space.

© OMA New York © OMA New York © OMA New York © OMA New York + 14

In New York City, When Form Follows Finance the Sky's The Limit

07:00 - 18 February, 2019
Courtesy of SHoP Architects
Courtesy of SHoP Architects

The hyperreal renderings predicting New York City’s skyline in 2018 are coming to life as the city’s wealth physically manifests into the next generation of skyscrapers. Just like millennials and their ability to kill whole industries singlehandedly, we are still fixated on the supertalls: how tall, how expensive, how record-breaking? Obsession with this typology centers around their excessive, bourgeois nature, but – at least among architects – rarely has much regard for the processes which enable the phenomenon.

4 Mega Bridges that were Never Built

11:00 - 25 January, 2019
4 Mega Bridges that were Never Built, EuroRoute Bridge, between Britain and France. Image Courtesy of 911Metallurgist
EuroRoute Bridge, between Britain and France. Image Courtesy of 911Metallurgist

2019 has already witnessed a series of bridge-related milestones marked, from the world’s longest bridge nearing completion in Kuwait to the world’s largest 3D-printed concrete bridge being completed in Shanghai. As we remain fixated on the future-driven, record-breaking accomplishments of realized bridge design, "911 Metallurgist” has chosen to look back in history on some of the visionary ideas for bridges which never saw the light of day.

Whether stopped in their tracks by finance, planning, or engineering difficulties, the four bridge designs listed below embody a marriage of art and engineering too advanced for their time. From a proposal for a EuroRoute Bridge between Britain and France, to a 12-rail, 24-lane bridge across the Huston River in New York, all four designs share a common, ambitious, yet doomed vision of crossing the great divide from pen and paper to bricks and mortar.

Gensler's Tower Fifth in New York City will be the Second-Tallest Building in the Western Hemisphere

13:00 - 23 January, 2019
Gensler's Tower Fifth in New York City will be the Second-Tallest Building in the Western Hemisphere, © TMRW, courtesy of Gensler
© TMRW, courtesy of Gensler

Gensler has released details of their proposed Tower Fifth in New York City. If realized, the 1556-foot-tall scheme would be the second-tallest building not just in New York, but in the Western Hemisphere. Located east of Fifth Avenue between 51st and 52nd Street, the tower will sit adjacent to St. Patrick’s Cathedral.

According to Gensler, who designed the scheme in collaboration with developer Harry Macklowe, the tower “creates a new paradigm for how a supertall structure meets the street and interacts with its neighbors.”

Bjarke Ingels Group's XI / The Eleventh Takes Shape in New York City

14:15 - 18 January, 2019
© Paul Clemence
© Paul Clemence

New photographs by Paul Clemence from Archi-Photo show BIG -Bjarke Ingels Group’s “The Eleventh” taking shape as construction continues in Chelsea, Manhattan. Having topped out in August 2018, the scheme’s twisting geometries are taking their place within the “Pritzker District” with neighbors including Frank Gehry’s IAC Building, Jean Nouvel’s 100 11th Avenue and Foster + Partners’ 551 West 21st Street.

The development’s larger 35-story, 400-foot-tall structure will twist alongside a second 300-foot-tall sister tower, both clad with bronze and travertine, sharing a connected podium and skybridge.

© Paul Clemence © Paul Clemence © Paul Clemence © Paul Clemence + 27

New York City's Chrysler Building is Up for Sale

05:00 - 17 January, 2019
New York City's Chrysler Building is Up for Sale, Chrysler Building. Image Courtesy of Tishman Speyer
Chrysler Building. Image Courtesy of Tishman Speyer

New York City's famed Chrysler Building is up for sale for the first time in over 20 years. According to the Wall Street Journal, the art deco office tower’s current owners officially placed it on the market, though the building's value has yet to be released. Designed by William Van Alen, the building was bought by Tishman Speyer in 1997. As an iconic part of the New York skyline, the building is admired for its distinctive ornamentation based on Chrysler automobiles.

Re-Imagining New York's Central Park after an Eco-Terrorist Attack

11:00 - 31 December, 2018
Re-Imagining New York's Central Park after an Eco-Terrorist Attack, Central Cloud of Breath / Chuanfei Yu, Jiaqi Wang + Huiwen Shi (South East University – Nanjing, China). Image © LA+ Iconoclast
Central Cloud of Breath / Chuanfei Yu, Jiaqi Wang + Huiwen Shi (South East University – Nanjing, China). Image © LA+ Iconoclast

The results of the LA+ ICONCOCLAST competition have been published, asking designers to reimagine and redesign New York’s Central Park following a fictional eco-terrorist attack. In total, over 380 designers from 30 countries submitted over 190 designs, culminating in five equal winners.

Hailing from the UK, USA, China, and Australia, the winning entries ranged from "megastructures to new ecologies and radical ideas for democratizing public space.” Jury chair Richard Weller praised the winners for “how designers can move beyond the status quo of picturesque large parks and embrace the challenges and opportunities of the 21st century.”

Will Snøhetta's Redesign Calm the Outcry From Its Original Controversial Proposal?

09:30 - 12 December, 2018
Will Snøhetta's Redesign Calm the Outcry From Its Original Controversial Proposal?, Courtesy of LMNB & Snøhetta
Courtesy of LMNB & Snøhetta

Labeled as "vandalism" and "murder" of an icon of postmodernism, Oslo-based firm Snøhetta's redesign proposal for Phillip Johnson and John Burgee's AT&T Headquarters was received with instantaneous backlash across the architectural community last year. Architect Robert A. M. Stern, marched alongside a protest outside 550 Madison Avenue, and even critic Norman Foster, who never claimed to have any sympathy for the postmodern movement, still vocalized his sentiments that "[the building] is an important part of our heritage and should be respected as such."

A rejection of the bland and cold functionality of Midtown's crystal skyscrapers, the AT&T building was intended to encourage a more playful approach architecture in the corporate world; the crazy socks beneath a three-piece suit. It was not without controversy. Upon its completion, the building was derided for its decorative and outsized pediment and occasionally dark interior spaces. Indeed, the building's arched entry spaces were among the only architectural elements to be met with praise from both critics and the public. 

Courtesy of LMNB & Snøhetta Courtesy of LMNB & Snøhetta Courtesy of LMNB & Snøhetta Courtesy of LMNB & Snøhetta + 6

The High Line's New Public Space to Feature the Work of Simone Leigh

12:01 - 10 December, 2018
The High Line's New Public Space to Feature the Work of Simone Leigh, The Spur & The Plinth. Image Courtesy of James Corner Field Operations and Diller Scofidio + Renfro
The Spur & The Plinth. Image Courtesy of James Corner Field Operations and Diller Scofidio + Renfro

Next year New York's iconic High Line will open a new public space for art designed by James Corner Field Operations and Diller Scofidio + Renfro, with artwork by Simone Leigh. The public space will be the newest section of the elevated park dedicated to a rotating series of contemporary art commissions. The first art project in the space will be Brick House, a sixteen-foot-tall bronze bust of a black woman by Brooklyn’s Simone Leigh.

The Spur & The Plinth. Image Courtesy of James Corner Field Operations and Diller Scofidio + Renfro The Spur & The Plinth. Image Courtesy of James Corner Field Operations and Diller Scofidio + Renfro The Spur & The Plinth. Image Courtesy of James Corner Field Operations and Diller Scofidio + Renfro The Spur & The Plinth. Image Courtesy of James Corner Field Operations and Diller Scofidio + Renfro + 7

4 Projects That Show Mass Timber is the Future of American Cities

09:30 - 24 November, 2018
4 Projects That Show Mass Timber is the Future of American Cities, Courtesy of DLR Group
Courtesy of DLR Group

As architects face up to the need for ethical, sustainable design in the age of climate change awareness, timber architecture is making a comeback in a new, technologically impressive way. Largely overlooked in the age of Modernism, recent years have seen a plethora of advancements related to mass timber across the world. This year alone, Japan announced plans for a supertall wooden skyscraper in Tokyo by 2041, while the European continent has seen plans for the world’s largest timber building in the Netherlands, and the world’s tallest timber tower in Norway.

The potential for mass timber to become the dominant material of future sustainable cities has also gained traction in the United States throughout 2018. Evolving codes and the increasing availability of mass timber is inspiring firms, universities, and state legislators to research and invest in ambitious projects across the country.

Studio Cadena Unveils "Happy" Installation in New York's Flatiron Plaza

13:00 - 21 November, 2018
Studio Cadena Unveils "Happy" Installation in New York's Flatiron Plaza, Happy. Image © Benjamin Cadena
Happy. Image © Benjamin Cadena

Studio Cadena’s Happy installation has been unveiled in New York's Flatiron Plaza. The project is the winner of the fifth annual Design Competition hosted by the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership Business Improvement District (BID) and Van Alen Institute. As the centerpiece of the annual holiday program, the installation was selected by a jury with expertise across the worlds of design and public art, including representatives from the Flatiron Partnership, New York City DOT Art, and Van Alen Institute’s board of trustees.

Happy. Image © Cameron Blaylock Happy. Image © Cameron Blaylock Happy. Image © Cameron Blaylock Happy. Image © Cameron Blaylock + 7

The Met Selects wHY Architecture to Renovate Rockefeller Wing in New York City

13:00 - 20 November, 2018
The Met Selects wHY Architecture to Renovate Rockefeller Wing in New York City, Michael C. Rockefeller Wing. Image Courtesy of wHY Architecture
Michael C. Rockefeller Wing. Image Courtesy of wHY Architecture

The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City has selected Kulapat Yantrasast and wHY Architecture to renovate its Michael C. Rockefeller wing. With arts produced in Africa, Oceania and the Americas, the 40,000-square-foot wing is located on the southern side of the Fifth Avenue museum. The $70 million project aim is showcase the collection of arts and artifacts from sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific Islands, and the Americas.

Nike House of Innovation 000 in New York City Reflects a New Generation in Sports Performance

11:00 - 17 November, 2018
Nike House of Innovation 000 in New York City Reflects a New Generation in Sports Performance, Courtesy of Nike
Courtesy of Nike

Nike House of Innovation 000 continues the athletic brand’s redefinition. As a company that prides itself on the innovative design of its foot and athletic wear, Nike has chosen to design its retail locations to reflect a new generation in sports performance. The House of Innovation maintains a foundation in flexible design, allowing the retailer to provide its patron with an immersive brand experience.

The store concept is described as “one floor, one world.” Each floor, inspired by the sounds and movement of New York, highlights different collections within the Nike brand. The retail program of each floor gets more specific as the levels increase. The 68,000 square-foot, six-level destination is the second Nike House of Innovation. The first was opened in Shanghai last month. These stores are the first of a new generation of sport retail experiences for Nike, numbered sequentially around the globe.

MVRDV's First US Project Breaks Ground in New York City

13:00 - 15 November, 2018
MVRDV's First US Project Breaks Ground in New York City, Radio Tower & Hotel. Image Courtesy of MVRDV
Radio Tower & Hotel. Image Courtesy of MVRDV

Dutch practice MVRDV has broken ground on Radio Tower & Hotel, a 21,800-square-meter mixed-use high rise located in the Washington Heights area in northern Manhattan. The 22-storey building is MVRDV’s first major project in the United States and combines hotel, retail, and office functions in vibrantly stacked blocks. The project was designed to reflecte the vivacious character of the neighborhood and set a direction for future development.

Radio Tower & Hotel. Image Courtesy of MVRDV Radio Tower & Hotel. Image Courtesy of MVRDV Radio Tower & Hotel. Image Courtesy of MVRDV Radio Tower & Hotel. Image Courtesy of MVRDV + 9

New York City Pop-up Celebrates 40 Years of Zaha Hadid's Design Innovations

05:00 - 12 November, 2018
New York City Pop-up Celebrates 40 Years of Zaha Hadid's Design Innovations, Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects
Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects

From city master plans to pocket-sized products, Zaha Hadid Architects (ZHA) have explored architectural formalism through innovative digital design methods. In 2006, the collaboration with furniture-makers and fashion houses led to the creation of Zaha Hadid Design that served both as an iterative process for and a resultant of ongoing architectural design.

A pop-up exhibition, located suitably on the ground floor of ZHA's renowned condominium along the High Line in New York City, features a scale model of the building itself on display. To honor and present the work produced by the firm in the last four decades, the Zaha Hadid Gallery showcases a series of projects in a wide range of mediums including the six 'Silver Models' that represent eight of the firm's key works.

© Luke Hayes Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects Courtesy of Slamp © Kris Tamburello + 22

Denise Scott Brown's Photography from the 1950s and 60s Unveiled in New York and London Galleries

10:00 - 6 November, 2018
Denise Scott Brown's Photography from the 1950s and 60s Unveiled in New York and London Galleries, Courtesy of carriage trade, photo: Nicholas Knight.
Courtesy of carriage trade, photo: Nicholas Knight.

An exhibition has opened at New York’s Carriage Trade Gallery celebrating the photography of Denise Scott Brown, highlighting the significance of pop art in the American vernacular. The project was initiated by Scott Brown, and first exhibited in Venice in 2016, with the latest events in London and New York initiated by PLANE-SITE.

The exhibition, titled “Photographs 1956-1966” is co-curated by Andres Ramirez, with 10 photographs selected, curated, and featured for limited sale. As well as being on display at the Carriage Trade Gallery, a concurrent exhibition is taking place in the Window Galleries at Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts, London.

Courtesy of carriage trade, photo: Nicholas Knight. Courtesy of carriage trade, photo: Nicholas Knight. Courtesy of carriage trade, photo: Nicholas Knight. Courtesy of carriage trade, photo: Nicholas Knight. + 24

Foster + Partners Chosen to Design JP Morgan Chase Headquarters in New York City

09:00 - 6 November, 2018
Foster + Partners Chosen to Design JP Morgan Chase Headquarters in New York City, The existing headquarters of JP Morgan Chase. Image © Shutterstock
The existing headquarters of JP Morgan Chase. Image © Shutterstock

Foster + Partners has been chosen to design the new HQ for JP Morgan Chase on Park Avenue, New York City. The new global headquarters, situated on 270 Park Avenue, follows on from previous corporate headquarters designed by the firm, including the 2018 Stirling Prize-winning Bloomberg HQ, and the Apple Campus 2 in California.

The new scheme will replace the existing Manhattan premises of the US investment bank and is expected to total 2.5 million square feet. The headquarters will house around 15,000 employees across 70 levels, replacing the original 52-story scheme designed by Skidmore Owings and Merrill in the 1960s.

AD Classics: Radio City Music Hall / Edward Durell Stone & Donald Deskey

22:00 - 26 October, 2018
AD Classics: Radio City Music Hall / Edward Durell Stone & Donald Deskey, Courtesy of Flickr user Erik Drost
Courtesy of Flickr user Erik Drost

This article was originally published on July 29, 2016. To read the stories behind other celebrated architecture projects, visit our AD Classics section.

Upon opening its doors for the first time on a rainy winter’s night in 1932, the Radio City Music Hall in Manhattan was proclaimed so extraordinarily beautiful as to need no performers at all. The first built component of the massive Rockefeller Center, the Music Hall has been the world’s largest indoor theater for over eighty years. With its elegant Art Deco interiors and complex stage machinery, the theater defied tradition to set a new standard for modern entertainment venues that remains to this day.

Courtesy of Flickr user Ed Schipul Courtesy of Flickr user Roger Courtesy of Flickr user Steve Huang Courtesy of Flickr user Mattia Panciroli + 10