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Biophilic Design: The Latest Architecture and News

5 Regenerative Strategies to Activate the Dead Edges in our Cities Post-Pandemic

As the city continues to evolve and transform, dead edges in the cityscape begin to emerge, subsequently reducing the level of activity in our built environment. These 'dead edges' refer to the areas that lack active engagement, they remain empty and deprived of people, since they no longer present themselves as useful or appealing. As the Covid-19 pandemic draws to an ultimate close, the first issue we may face post-pandemic is to revive our urban environment. A kiss of life into a tired and outdated cityscape...

The focal element in creating an active and healthy urban environment is by increasing vitality through placemaking. Creating diverse and interesting places to reside, thrive, and work. Here are five regenerative strategies that animate the cityscape and ultimately produce resilient, attractive, and flexible environments.

WeWork Weihai Lu Offices / Linehouse. Image © Jonathon Leijonhufvud10 Charles Apartment Building / COOKFOX Architects. Image © Frank OudemanTOD Project Shenzhen Biophilic design / Ronald Lu & Partners . Image Courtesy of Ronald Lu & PartnersNeighbourhood Next 15-Minute City / Gehl Architects . Image Courtesy of 3XN+ 18

The Biophilic Response to Wood: Can it Promote the Wellbeing of Building Occupants?

Although the term may seem recent, the concept of biophilia has been used for decades in architecture and design. The guiding principle is quite simple: connect people inside with nature to promote their well-being and quality of life. With all the ongoing design trends that have consolidated as a result, the demand has focused on organic materials that emulate outdoor environments. Among all the options, wood is one of the most popular materials to bring nature indoors, not only because of its functionality, but also due to its multiple physiological and psychological benefits.

Koichi Takada Architects Designs Biophilic Marketplace Inspired by Shanghai's Forests

For its latest design in China, the Australian firm Koichi Takada Architects takes inspiration from Shanghai's forest-rich landscape and creates a series of architectural "trees" that branch out, forming a canopy above a new marketplace. Through its open, biophilic design, the Solar Trees Marketplace will be an extension of the outdoor public space, reinterpreting the traditional Chinese market as a community place.

© SAN© SAN© SAN© Doug and Wolf+ 11

PLP Architecture Reveals Design for Residential Development in Singapore

PLP revealed its design for a luxury residential tower in Singapore, featuring a lush vertical garden inspired by the city’s greenery. The biophilic design that blurs the line between indoor living areas and outdoor spaces strives to redefine metropolitan living by promoting health and wellbeing.

Kengo Kuma to Design Milan's Biophilic Office of the Future

Construction has begun on “Welcome, feeling at work”, a biophilic office of the future in Milan, Italy. Designed by Kengo Kuma & Associates and commissioned by Europa Risorse, this venture seeks to create a workspace centered on employee health and wellbeing, integrated within its local environment. Imagined to be one of the most sustainable office development to date, the project is scheduled for 2024.

Courtesy of Kengo Kuma and AssociatesCourtesy of Kengo Kuma and AssociatesCourtesy of Kengo Kuma and AssociatesCourtesy of Kengo Kuma and Associates+ 12

Color Beyond Aesthetics: The Psychology of Green in Interior Spaces

How many changes have you done to your interior space during this past year? Whether it was a change of furniture layout, repainting the walls, adding more light fixtures or perhaps even removing them, after spending so much time in one place, the space you were once used to didn’t make sense anymore. We could blame the overall situation for how we’ve been feeling lately, but as a matter of fact, the interior environment plays a huge role in how we feel or behave as well. However, if you were wondering why some neighbors seem much more undisturbed and serene even in the midst of a pandemic, it could be because the interior is greener on the other side.

Green 26 / Anonym. Image © Chaovarith PoonpholCultural Activity of Beijing Guang'anmennei Community / MAT Office. Image © Kangshuo TangOttoman | Footstool Outdoor Complete Item by Ligne Roset on Architonic. Image Courtesy of Ligne RosetArtwork | Deco_01 by FLORIM on Architonic. Image Courtesy of FLORIM+ 26

Bringing the Outdoors Inside: The Benefits of Biophilia in Architecture and Interior Spaces

If a person were to imagine a setting of complete relaxation, odds are the first image that comes to mind is a place surrounded by nature, be it a forest, the mountains, the sea, or a meadow. Rarely does one imagine an office or a shopping mall as a source of comfort and relaxation. Still, the majority of people spend almost 80-90 % of their time indoors, going back and forth from their houses to their workplaces.

Architects and designers are now searching for design solutions that will resonate well into the future, turning to 'biophilia' as an important source of inspiration that promotes well-being, health, and emotional comfort.

Xylem Pavilion / Kere Architecture. Image © Iwan Baan© Favaro Jr.Botanica House / Guz Architects. Image © Patrick Bingham-HallXylem Pavilion / Kere Architecture. Image © Iwan Baan+ 15

Biophilia: Bringing Nature into Interior Design

Interior design begins with human experience. Considering the physical, mental, and emotional needs of people, interior designers use human-centered approaches to address how we live today. Creating novel approaches to promoting health, safety, and welfare, contemporary interiors are increasingly inspired by biophilia as a holistic approach to design.

© Scott Burrows Photography© Iwan BaanCourtesy of COOKFOX Architects© Rasmus Hjortshoj+ 8

Biophilic Design in Prisons

Guymer Bailey Melbourne Studio © Guymer Bailey Architects
Guymer Bailey Melbourne Studio © Guymer Bailey Architects

Imagine that you are in a cubicle located in the middle of the office floor plate.  Your office has a glazed front, but you are looking into another open office. You have no real window or view to the outside, so you can't tell if it's raining outside or sunny.  If you are lucky, and you do have a window, it's fixed, and you are looking into an office in the neighbouring building that is five metres away.

The fluorescent lighting that you sit under for eight hours has thrown out your body's natural circadian rhythm. The ventilation is alright, but you start to feel droopy at around 3pm because the carbon dioxide levels in your shoebox have risen. It might even feel a bit stuffy, regardless of the door being open or closed. As you don't have an operable window, you have been breathing in recycled air all day. When you get outside and take a breath, you will instantly notice that the air outside is fresh.

Now multiply that by five days a week, 48 weeks a year. Maybe you will get a pot plant in a few weeks.

Custom Surface Solutions for Community-Inspired Architectural Design

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Customization, within the context of interior architectural design, is a resurfacing topic among cross-disciplined design firms focused on interior architecture. Since the reemergence of the Localism trend, individuals and organizations increasingly seek one-of-a-kind experiences, objects, and spaces that can help deepen their connections to their communities.

3 Trends Inspiring New Architectural Surfaces

World leading engineered surfaces manufacturer shares three trends influencing next-generation decorative surfaces

For years, interior surface designers have drawn inspiration from their environments in order to create delightful and innovative engineered surfacing materials specified in architectural spaces. From familiar and traditional to futuristic and contemporary, design inspiration can be found all around structures, elements, and styles that surround us every day.

How to Judge a Building: Does it Make you Feel More, Or Less Alive?

This extract was originally published on Common Edge as "The Legacy of Christopher Alexander: Criteria for an Intelligent Architecture."

In his monumental four-volume book, The Nature of Order, Christopher Alexander talks about an intelligent architecture, responsive to human needs and sensibilities through adaptation to existing buildings and nature. This is a new way of viewing the world—a way of connecting to it, and to ourselves—yet it is very much the same as the most ancient ways of connecting.

Vincent Callebaut Architectures Wins Public Vote for Millennial Vertical Forest Competition

For the "Imagine Angers" international design competition, Vincent Callebaut Architectures worked in collaboration with Bouygues Immobilier group to submit a proposal for the French city at the intersection of social and technological innovation, with a focus on ecology and hospitality. Named Arboricole, meaning “tree” and “cultivation,” this live-work-play environment gives back as much to the environment as it does its users. Although WY-TO prevailed in the competition, the Callebaut scheme succeeded in winning the public vote.

Courtesy of Vincent Callebaut ArchitecturesCourtesy of Vincent Callebaut ArchitecturesCourtesy of Vincent Callebaut ArchitecturesCourtesy of Vincent Callebaut Architectures+ 26

Baubotanik: The Botanically Inspired Design System that Creates Living Buildings

Timber buildings are regularly praised for their sustainability, as carbon dioxide removed from the atmosphere by the trees remains locked in the structure of the building. But what if you could go one better, to design buildings that not only lock in carbon, but actively absorb carbon dioxide to strengthen their structure? In this article, originally published by the International Federation of Landscape Architects as "Baubotanik: Botanically Inspired Biodesign," Ansel Oommen explores the theory and techniques of Baubotanik, a system of building with live trees that attempts to do just that.

Trees are the tall, quiet guardians of our human narrative. They spend their entire lives breathing for the planet, supporting vast ecosystems, all while providing key services in the form of food, shelter, and medicine. Their resilient boughs lift both the sky and our spirits. Their moss-aged grandeur stands testament to the shifting times, so much so, that to imagine a world without trees is to imagine a world without life.

To move forward then, mankind must not only coexist with nature, but also be its active benefactor. In Germany, this alliance is found through Baubotanik, or Living Plant Constructions. Coined by architect, Dr. Ferdinand Ludwig, the practice was inspired by the ancient art of tree shaping.

Willow tower after completion. Image © Ferdinand LudwigConnection detail 2012. Image © Ferdinand LudwigTest field with inosculations. Image © foto chira moroPlane cube: view from south-west directly after completion. Image © Ludwig.Schönle+ 8