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Adaptive Reuse: The Latest Architecture and News

SquareOne Proposes Repurposing a Water Tower as Public Spas/Student Housing

13:00 - 18 February, 2019
SquareOne Proposes Repurposing a Water Tower as Public Spas/Student Housing, Public spa. Image Courtesy of SquareOne
Public spa. Image Courtesy of SquareOne

Raise your hand if you’ve ever wanted to go swimming inside a water tower. In reality, it would probably be dark and creepy and not as cool as it sounds, but that’s not the case with Danish firm SquareOne’s design, where the top of an abandoned water tower becomes a public swimming pool and spa. Utilizing the existing structural system of the tower, SquareOne is also proposing adding 40+ student housing units suspended around the tower. This dual-purpose scheme addresses Copenhagen’s desperate housing shortage while also giving new life to an old building.

 

Interior beam structure of Taarnby water tower. Image Courtesy of SquareOne Existing Taarnby water tower. Image Courtesy of SquareOne Proposed Taarnby water tower. Image Courtesy of SquareOne Courtesy of SquareOne + 10

Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners Gains Approval for Hammersmith Town Hall Refurbishment in London

11:00 - 18 February, 2019
Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners Gains Approval for Hammersmith Town Hall Refurbishment in London, Visualisation of Hammersmith Town Hall. Image © 7-T
Visualisation of Hammersmith Town Hall. Image © 7-T

Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners have gained planning permission for the proposed extension and full refurbishment of the Grade II-listed Hammersmith Town Hall in London. A joint venture with Hammersmith & Fulham Council and commercial partners a2Dominion, the scheme seeks to promote “the creation of a new high quality civic mixed-use development” derived from the historic structure.

Through the demolition of a 1970s extension, the scheme will create a new public square that enhances the setting of the existing protected Town Hall, reinstating its presence on Kings Street. The main alternations seek to enhance the existing building through a glass box rooftop extension containing council office space.

Visualisation of the interior of Hammersmith Town Hall. Image © 7-T Visualisation of the north facade of the Town Hall extension. Image © 7-T Visualisation of the interior of Hammersmith Town Hall. Image © 7-T © 7-T + 6

Schmidt Hammer Lassen Revitalizes Boston's Commonwealth Pier through Adaptive Reuse

09:00 - 14 February, 2019
Schmidt Hammer Lassen Revitalizes Boston's Commonwealth Pier through Adaptive Reuse, © Cityscape Digital for Pembroke
© Cityscape Digital for Pembroke

Schmidt Hammer Lassen has announced details of their second U.S. project: the Seaport World Trade Center in Boston, Massachusetts. An adaptive reuse project that will bring new life to Boston’s Commonwealth Pier, the 68,500-square-meter mixed-use project seeks to reactivate a historic maritime hub to create a new waterfront destination.

The largest pier building in the world when completed in 1901, the Commonwealth Pier will be reactivated with the introduction of new materials, increased daylight, and new points of connectivity. The exercise in adaptive reuse will contain flexible office space, dynamic event space, new retail, dining, and public amenities.

The Trends that Will Influence Architecture in 2019

08:30 - 4 February, 2019
The Trends that Will Influence Architecture in 2019, © Alberto Cosi. ImageBamboo Sports Hall for Panyaden International School / Chiangmai Life Construction
© Alberto Cosi. ImageBamboo Sports Hall for Panyaden International School / Chiangmai Life Construction

It is, once again, the time of year where we look towards the future to define the goals and approaches that we will take for our careers throughout the upcoming year. To help the millions of architects who visit ArchDaily every day from all over the world, we compiled a list of the most popular ideas of 2018, which will continue to be developed and consolidated throughout 2019.

Over 130 million users discovered new references, materials, and tools in 2018 alone, infusing their practice of architecture with the means to improve the quality of life for our cities and built spaces. As users demonstrated certain affinities and/or demonstrated greater interest in particular topics, these emerged as trends. 

The Week in Architecture: Blue Monday and the Aspirations of a New Year

12:00 - 27 January, 2019
The Week in Architecture: Blue Monday and the Aspirations of a New Year, Courtesy of Pritzker Prize. Image © Hisao Suzuki
Courtesy of Pritzker Prize. Image © Hisao Suzuki

For those in the northern hemisphere, the last full week in January last week kicks off with Blue Monday - the day claimed to be the most depressing of the year. Weather is bleak, sunsets are early, resolutions are broken, and there’s only the vaguest glimpse of a holiday on the horizon. It’s perhaps this miserable context that is making the field seem extra productive, with a spate of new projects, toppings out and, completions announced this week.

The week of 21 January 2019 in review, after the break: 

LocHal / Mecanoo. Image © Ossip van Duivenbode © TMRW, courtesy of Gensler ©Jaime Navarro The Week in Architecture: Blue Monday and the Aspirations of a New Year + 11

MVRDV's Design for 'KoolKiel' Tower Brings Distinctive Whimsy to an Adaptable Scheme

09:00 - 25 January, 2019
MVRDV's Design for 'KoolKiel' Tower Brings Distinctive Whimsy to an Adaptable Scheme, © MVRDV
© MVRDV

MVRDV have released details of their proposed mixed-use complex, designed to redevelop a post-industrial site in Kiel, Germany. The 65,000-square-meter proposal will adopt a flexible design system as opposed to a fixed, unchangeable plan, thus allowing the scheme to adapt to future demands as the design development progresses.

Labeled the “KoolKiel,” MVRDV’s scheme will occupy an existing large, single-story building previously used to store chains of ships, and for the printing of Germany’s famous Werner comics in the 1980s. The site’s current use as a hub for media and creative industries, and its resulting charismatic identity, has strongly influenced the MVRDV scheme, with the retention of the existing structure and lively, playful exterior spaces.

© MVRDV © MVRDV © MVRDV Interior. Image © MVRDV + 20

Turin's Castello di Rivoli Tells a Story of the Region's History through Its Architecture

07:15 - 24 January, 2019
Castello di Rivoli / Andrea Bruno (Refurbishment). Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Castello di Rivoli / Andrea Bruno (Refurbishment). Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

Given the sheer magnitude and influence of its recorded history, Italy as we know it is a surprisingly young country. For centuries, the region was divided between powerful (and sometimes warring) city-states, each with their own identity, culture, and, fortunes, and influence. Some are eternally famous. Rome is a cradle of history and heart of religion; cool Milan is a hub of contemporary fashion and design; Florence is synonymous with the Renaissance and all the epoch’s relationship to the arts.

Turin’s history is arguably less romantic. The small city in Savoy, a north-Italian region bordering France, has established an identity as an industrial powerhouse. It is home to FIAT and some of Italy’s finest universities; the streets are dotted with works by Nervi, Botta, and Rossi. But despite the design pedigree, perhaps nothing better illustrates the region’s faceted history better than Castello di Rivoli.

Castello di Rivoli / Andrea Bruno (Refurbishment). Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu Castello di Rivoli / Andrea Bruno (Refurbishment). Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu Castello di Rivoli / Andrea Bruno (Refurbishment). Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu Castello di Rivoli / Andrea Bruno (Refurbishment). Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 21

Japan's Bet on Adaptive Reuse to Alleviate an Emerging Housing Crisis

07:30 - 13 December, 2018
Japan's Bet on Adaptive Reuse to Alleviate an Emerging Housing Crisis, via Flickr. Image © Bo Nielsen
via Flickr. Image © Bo Nielsen

Half a century after the new suburban tract home was the dream of many a young American family, refurbished properties are gaining in popularity. This trend extends beyond North America, with exciting renovations of existing structures popping up all over the world, from Belgium to Kenya to China. The attraction to this typology likely lies in its multiplicity; renovations are both new and old, historic and forward-looking, generative and sustainable. 

Nowhere is this trend more visible and popular than in housing, where the transformation is often led by the owners themselves. Loosely grouped under terms like “fixer-upper” and “adaptive reuse,” these projects begin with just the structural skeletons and the building’s history. At the personal scale, renovation/refurbishment is an opportunity to bring a part of yourself to your home - but do these small projects together have the potential to turn around a housing crisis?

This Week in Architecture: Reduce, Reuse, Rethink

08:00 - 24 November, 2018
This Week in Architecture: Reduce, Reuse, Rethink, © Leonardo Finotti
© Leonardo Finotti

It's easy to feel overwhelmed by the massive production of architecture today. Scroll through ArchDaily for more than a minute and even we'd forgive you for losing track of it all. But what seems like an endless scroll of architectural production doesn't quite fit with the popular movements surrounding resource sharing and community. 

Hidden among the mass production that has defined architecture in the last century is a germ - one that seems to be marching to the forefront of practice today. More and more designers seem to be taking on locally-focused and/or adaptive reuse works. Award shortlists today highlight not icons by recognizable names, but sensitive international works that are notable for their process as much as their product.

The common image of the architect may be of one obsessed with ego and newness, but practice today doesn't bear that out as much as it used to. This week's news touched on issues of reduction, reuse, and a radical rethink what architecture is in the 21st century. 

2019 Rudy Bruner Award for Urban Excellence: Call for Entries Open

15:42 - 27 September, 2018
2019 Rudy Bruner Award for Urban Excellence: Call for Entries Open, 2017 Rudy Bruner Award Medalists (Photo Credits on RBA Website)
2017 Rudy Bruner Award Medalists (Photo Credits on RBA Website)

The Rudy Bruner Award for Urban Excellence (RBA) celebrates transformative urban places distinguished by their economic and social contributions to our nation’s cities. Winners offer creative placemaking solutions that transcend the boundaries between architecture, urban design and planning and showcase innovative thinking about American cities. One Gold Medal of $50,000 and four Silver Medals of $10,000 will be awarded. 

Reinventing a Superblock in Central Seoul - Without the Gentrification

09:30 - 13 August, 2018
Reinventing a Superblock in Central Seoul - Without the Gentrification, Courtesy Kyoung Roh, via Metropolis Magazine
Courtesy Kyoung Roh, via Metropolis Magazine

This article was originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "A Once-Maligned Concrete Megastructure in Seoul is Revitalized - Sans Gentrification".

Upon its completion in 1966, Sewoon Sangga, designed by prominent South Korean architect Kim Swoo-geun, was a groundbreaking residential and commercial megastructure consisting of eight multistory buildings covering a full kilometer in the heart of Seoul. Like other futuristic projects of the decade, it was conceived as a self-contained city, complete with amenities that included a park, an atrium, and a pedestrian deck. But construction realities crippled Kim’s utopian vision, compromising those features. By the late 1970s, Sewoon Sangga had shed residents and anchor retail outlets to newer, shinier developments in the wealthy Gangnam district across the river. Between Sewoon’s central location and plunging rents, the building became a hub for light industry—as well as illicit activity.

Studio Komma Will Transform Former Dutch Cargo Ships Into Sustainable Homes

06:30 - 20 July, 2018
Studio Komma Will Transform Former Dutch Cargo Ships Into Sustainable Homes, Courtesy of Studio Komma
Courtesy of Studio Komma

Adaptive reuse, the process of refashioning a defunct structure for a new purpose, is ubiquitous these days—so much so that hearing a phrase like “converted warehouse” or “repurposed factory” barely causes one to blink an eye. However, a new project from a cohort of Dutch architecture firms highlights the innovative nature of adaptive reuse with a scheme that reimagines disused cargo ships as houses. With their fully intact exterior shells, the ships remind residents and visitors of their industrial, seafaring past.

Courtesy of Studio Komma Courtesy of Studio Komma Courtesy of Studio Komma Courtesy of Studio Komma + 10

Berlin's Tempelhof Airport: Achieving Redemption Through Adaptive Reuse

09:30 - 29 May, 2018
Berlin's Tempelhof Airport: Achieving Redemption Through Adaptive Reuse, © Danica O. Kus
© Danica O. Kus

The story of Berlin’s Tempelhof Airport never quite ends.

Located just south of the city’s hip Kreuzberg neighborhood and only fifteen minutes by bike from the city center, the disused former Nazi complex—with its terminal, hangars, and massive airfield—occupies nearly 1,000 acres of prime real estate in the ever-growing German capital. In any other metropolis, this land would have been snatched up by a developer years ago, but in Berlin, creative reuse has prevailed over conventional narratives of redevelopment.

© Danica O. Kus © Danica O. Kus © Danica O. Kus © Danica O. Kus + 24

Louis Sullivan's Pilgrim Baptist Church Will be Renovated Into the Nation's First National Museum of Gospel Music

14:00 - 29 April, 2018
Louis Sullivan's Pilgrim Baptist Church Will be Renovated Into the Nation's First National Museum of Gospel Music, Courtesy of Wight & Company
Courtesy of Wight & Company

When architects were asked to re-imagine Chicago’s neglected buildings for an exhibition, Dirk Lohan designed a revitalization plan for Louis Sullivan's Pilgrim Baptist Church. Soon Sullivan’s landmark building will become the nation’s first National Museum of Gospel Music, complete with a cafe, retail store, event space, research and listening library, and a 350-seat auditorium.

Open Call: Building Brooklyn Awards 2108

17:04 - 5 March, 2018
Open Call: Building Brooklyn Awards 2108, Building Brooklyn Awards at historic Kings Theatre restoration
Building Brooklyn Awards at historic Kings Theatre restoration

The Building Brooklyn Awards is the Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce's annual architectural competition celebrating the best built and renovation projects in the borough for the prior year, with substantial completion by December 31.

In its 18th year, the competition is open to only projects within Brooklyn, NY and applications may be self-nominated or nominated by another entity. The annual award ceremony is held every July. Nomination forms can be accessed at https://brooklynchamberofcommerce.wufoo.com/forms/szlf8kr0aifgme/

Kengo Kuma Transforms Shanghai Shipyard Into Multi-Use Complex

04:00 - 2 March, 2018
Kengo Kuma Transforms Shanghai Shipyard Into Multi-Use Complex, © Julien Lanoo
© Julien Lanoo

In the Lujiazui financial district in Pudong, Shanghai, Kengo Kuma has reimagined a 1972 shipyard into a new 9,000-square-meter multi-use complex, named Shipyard 1862. Behind original, rugged brick walls, the old shipyard was once defined by a 12 by 30-meter grid, which allowed for massive interior spaces to hold ships. In this industrial-style adaptive reuse project, Kuma was careful to preserve the building’s structural and material integrity. These photographs provided by Julien Lanoo show how the industrial shell has been transformed by the refurbishment project.

P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S Transforms Warehouse into Dynamic Medical Facility

07:00 - 9 February, 2018
P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S Transforms Warehouse into Dynamic Medical Facility, Courtesy of P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S
Courtesy of P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S

An adaptive reuse project by P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S is currently under construction in North Hollywood, California. The project transforms an existing warehouse into a dynamic medical campus with Urgent Care, Elderly Daycare, Surgical Centre, Physical Therapy, Imaging Centre, Medical offices, café and a small shop.

Courtesy of P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S Courtesy of P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S Courtesy of P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S Courtesy of P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S + 14

Livability in the New American City

16:35 - 31 October, 2017
Livability in the New American City, Shop Meet Thrive
Shop Meet Thrive

Cities around the world are growing at an unprecedented rate, and for the first time in recent history represent the preferred place for people to live. Urbanization has historically aided millions in escaping hardship through increased employment opportunities, better education and healthcare, large-scale public investments, and access to improved infrastructure and services. The city has been the ideal for heightened livability for people worldwide.