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3d Printing

How to Bring Construction into the Future

09:30 - 3 August, 2018
How to Bring Construction into the Future, Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects. ImageOne Thousand Museum high-rise residential building in Miami, Florida, will feature a curving exoskeleton finished with glass fiber-reinforced concrete.
Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects. ImageOne Thousand Museum high-rise residential building in Miami, Florida, will feature a curving exoskeleton finished with glass fiber-reinforced concrete.

This article was originally published by Autodesk's Redshift publication as "The 4 Forces That Will Take on Concrete and Make Construction Smart."

When it comes to building a bridge, what prevents it from having the most enduring and sustainable life span? What is its worst enemy? The answer is, simply, the bridge itself—its own weight.

Built with today’s construction processes, bridges and buildings are so overly massed with energy and material that they’re inherently unsustainable. While concrete is quite literally one of the foundations of modern construction, it’s not the best building material. It’s sensitive to pollution. It cracks, stains, and collapses in reaction to rain and carbon dioxide. It’s a dead weight: Take San Francisco’s sinking, leaning Millennium Tower as an example.

Modern, smart construction can and will do better. A convergent set of technologies will soon radically change how the construction industry builds and what it builds with.

NASA Endorses AI SpaceFactory's Vision for 3D Printed Huts on Mars

12:00 - 25 July, 2018
NASA Endorses AI SpaceFactory's Vision for 3D Printed Huts on Mars, Marsha could be grouped into small clusters. Image © Plompmozes
Marsha could be grouped into small clusters. Image © Plompmozes

AI SpaceFactory has released details of their proposed cylindrical huts for the Planet Mars, designed as part of the 3D Printed Habitat Challenge organized by NASA. Project MARSHA (Mars HAbitat) was endorsed by NASA with a top prize of almost $21,000, one of five designs selected from a field of seventeen.

The competition asked participants to design an effective habitat for a crew of four astronauts to be located on the Red Planet, using construction techniques enabled by 3D printing. The submitted schemes were then ranked based on their innovation, architectural layout, and level of detail in BIM modeling.

Astronauts observe the construction of a new habitat. Image © Plompmozes Marsha protects humans from the harsh Martian environment, including the frigid temperatures, dust storms and radiation. Image © Plompmozes Marsha’s architectural design is integrated with its lighting design, which automatically changes in sync with the time of day and the color and intensity of light. Image © Plompmozes Marsha’s two- shell structure creates flexible, hybrid spaces which offer a variety of lighting conditions, privacy, noise levels and uses. Image © Plompmozes + 26

WORKac Designs an 'Invisible' Penthouse in a Centuries-Old Cast-Iron Building

06:00 - 12 June, 2018
WORKac Designs an 'Invisible' Penthouse in a Centuries-Old Cast-Iron Building, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

At first glance, The Stealth Building looks like a pristinely-restored cast iron apartment building. That’s because technically, it is. But upon closer inspection, the Lower Manhattan building is rife with innovative restoration and renovation practices by WORKac.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 23

Co-Living, Custom-Order Homes, and Creative Economies: Is This the Future of High-Density Housing?

09:30 - 24 April, 2018
Co-Living, Custom-Order Homes, and Creative Economies: Is This the Future of High-Density Housing?, Architecture students use space-age materials and radical designs to imagine tomorrow’s urban housing centers. Image Courtesy of Design Research Laboratory
Architecture students use space-age materials and radical designs to imagine tomorrow’s urban housing centers. Image Courtesy of Design Research Laboratory

This article was originally published on Autodesk's Redshift publication as "Customizable Communities Could Be the Key to the Future of Urban Housing."

London has a fascinating history of urbanization that stretches back to Roman settlement in 43 AD. During the Industrial Revolution and Victorian Era, the city’s population peaked, as did its problems related to population density. The air was filled with soot and smoke, crowded slums were the norm in the inner city, and cholera and other epidemics spread quickly due to inadequate sanitation.

These conditions gave rise to modern urban planning and public-health policy, which now must define what “good density” might look like in the future of urban housing. The UN predicts that by 2050, 66 percent of the world’s population will live in metropolitan areas, up from 54 percent today.

MX3D Completes Structural Span of World's First 3D Printed Metal Bridge

08:00 - 13 April, 2018
MX3D Completes Structural Span of World's First 3D Printed Metal Bridge, via MX3D
via MX3D

Late last year, we reported on the progress of world’s first 3D printed steel bridge designed by Netherlands-based MX3D. With the design now finalized, the start-up company has announced that the span of the bridge is now complete. 

The final round of structural tests is expected to take place this summer, just three years after the project was first announced. After the structural integrity has been tested, the final design will be modified and the completion of the bridge will follow only a few months after. MX3D hopes to showcase the potential of their multi-axis 3D printer during the Dutch Design Week, and the first of its kind bridge is planned to be installed into its final location in a canal in Amsterdam sometime next year.

via MX3D via MX3D via MX3D via MX3D + 8

Campervan Breaks World Record for Largest Indoor 3D Print

14:00 - 25 March, 2018
Campervan Breaks World Record for Largest Indoor 3D Print, Courtesy of Create Cafe 3D Print
Courtesy of Create Cafe 3D Print

3D printing just got a whole lot more impressive. If we weren’t already enthralled by the bridgeshomeless shelters and structural components that have been made possible through 3D printing, a Canadian team have managed to print the world’s first 3D printed campervan that beats records for the largest indoor 3D print ever – three times larger than the previous record holder. Made from hundreds of feet of plastic filament, the seamless camper measures 13 feet long and six feet wide and took over 230 hours to build on their custom ErectorBot 3D printer.

Interior Design and 3D Printing: Giving Unique Forms to Functional Spaces

09:30 - 22 March, 2018
Interior Design and 3D Printing: Giving Unique Forms to Functional Spaces, The Juice Bar in the Loft Flagship store in Ginza, Tokyo, was 3D printed. Image © DUS and Nacása&Partners Inc
The Juice Bar in the Loft Flagship store in Ginza, Tokyo, was 3D printed. Image © DUS and Nacása&Partners Inc

This article was originally published by Archipreneur as "3D Printing is Making Its Way into Interior Design."

3D printing – also known as additive manufacturing – turns digital 3D models into solid objects by building them up in layers. The technology was first invented in the 1980s and has since found its way into our everyday life – and in architecture and interior design. Architecture firm DUS has a vast expertise in architectural 3D printing and is now applying its expertise to interiors and retail spaces.

“3D printing is an ideal technique to tailor-produce to a space or a brand,” says Inara Nevskaya, head designer at DUS. “We can link a furniture’s functionality with unique form features to create statement pieces, special focal points that frame new experiences for the consumer in the retail landscape.”

Backyard Cabin Experiments With 3D-Printed Tiles as a Facade Material

09:30 - 18 March, 2018
Backyard Cabin Experiments With 3D-Printed Tiles as a Facade Material, The cabin is integrated into the landscape thanks to the hundreds of succulents and air plants that comprise the facade and are held by the 3D-printed hexagonal planter tiles. 3D-printed chairs and tables, also designed by Emerging Objects, serve as both indoor and outdoor furniture. Image © Matthew Millman
The cabin is integrated into the landscape thanks to the hundreds of succulents and air plants that comprise the facade and are held by the 3D-printed hexagonal planter tiles. 3D-printed chairs and tables, also designed by Emerging Objects, serve as both indoor and outdoor furniture. Image © Matthew Millman

This article was originally published by The Architect's Newspaper as "Cutting-edge 3-D-printing pushes construction boundaries in an Oakland cabin."

The 3D-printed Cabin of Curiosities is a research endeavor and “proof of concept” investigation into the architectural possibilities of upcycling and custom 3D-printed claddings as a response to 21st-century housing needs.

This exploratory project is an output of Bay Area-based additive manufacturing startup Emerging Objects, founded by Ronald Rael and Virginia San Fratello, who are professors at the University of California Berkeley and San Jose State University, respectively. They also co-founded the architecture studio Rael San Fratello, whose work primarily focuses on architecture as a cultural endeavor.

The Chroma Curl wall is made of 3D-printed bio-plastic derived from corn. The textured surface creates a floral pattern throughout the interior. Image © Matthew Millman The clays used for the tiles are fired at a high temperature resulting in low porosity. Because the clay is recycled from a pottery studio, there is color differentiation in the surface. Image © Matthew Millman The seed stitch tiles explore the use of custom code to form a textured pattern that creates a micro-shading effect. Image © Matthew Millman Over 4,500 3D-printed ceramic tiles clad the majority of the building. The calibrated inconsistencies and material behavior make each tile unique. Ever changing shadows transform the cabin’s surface throughout the day as each seed stitch tile is gently curved to receive the sun and cast shadows. Image © Matthew Millman + 11

Futuristic Illustrations Show What Architecture and Construction Will Look Like in 2030

08:00 - 18 February, 2018
Futuristic Illustrations Show What Architecture and Construction Will Look Like in 2030, via MIT Technology Review
via MIT Technology Review

In a world where technology is at the forefront of our lives, it’s hard to imagine that many of the jobs that are available now did not exist 10 years ago; uber drivers, social media managers, app developers and even the job of an ArchDaily writer would have seemed an abstract concept! As technology advances further, even more job positions will be created and others left behind, leaving it open to speculation as to what will come next.

It is almost impossible to predict the future, but digital agency AKQA and Mish Global have attempted the impossible and envisioned several potential jobs in the design and construction industry in 2030 following inspiration from several panels they attended at the World Economic Forum. With the speed of changes over the last decade, they don’t seem too far from reality either.

3D Printing Fuses Thai Craftsmanship to Create Habitable Concrete Structures

06:00 - 12 February, 2018
3D Printing Fuses Thai Craftsmanship to Create Habitable Concrete Structures, Courtesy of Lapyote Prasittisopin, Chanita Chuaysiri / Siam Research and Innovation
Courtesy of Lapyote Prasittisopin, Chanita Chuaysiri / Siam Research and Innovation

Siam Research and Innovation Company (SRI) is a Thailand-based cement manufacturer that has been developing innovations to push the limits of 3D printing in architecture. Their project 'Triple S' –developed in 2017– is based on traditional Thai craftsmanship to generate Surface, Structure, and Shelter in a single process; its specific artisanal form creating beautiful framework for structural purposes, easily building living spaces.

Courtesy of Lapyote Prasittisopin, Chanita Chuaysiri / Siam Research and Innovation Courtesy of Lapyote Prasittisopin, Chanita Chuaysiri / Siam Research and Innovation Courtesy of Lapyote Prasittisopin, Chanita Chuaysiri / Siam Research and Innovation Courtesy of Lapyote Prasittisopin, Chanita Chuaysiri / Siam Research and Innovation + 22

The World's First Freeform 3D-Printed House Enters Development Phase

06:00 - 31 January, 2018
The World's First Freeform 3D-Printed House Enters Development Phase, Courtesy of WATG Urban
Courtesy of WATG Urban

WATG Urban's first prize design for The Freeform Home Design Challenge in 2016 is now moving one step closer to becoming a reality. Since winning the competition, WATG's Chicago office has been developing the winning design, dubbed Curve Appeal, alongside Branch Technology. Curve Appeal is now undergoing the "wall section testing, research and development phase" with an anticipated goal of breaking ground later this year. This revolutionary project could change the way we construct complex, freeform structures.

Courtesy of WATG Urban Courtesy of WATG Urban Courtesy of WATG Urban Courtesy of WATG Urban + 11

3D-Printed "Window to the Heart" to Be Constructed in Times Square for Valentine's Day

14:10 - 25 January, 2018
3D-Printed "Window to the Heart" to Be Constructed in Times Square for Valentine's Day, Courtesy of ArandaLasch + Marcelo Coelho with Formlabs
Courtesy of ArandaLasch + Marcelo Coelho with Formlabs

The collaboration of Aranda\Lasch + Marcelo Coelho has been selected as the winners of this year’s Times Square Valentine Heart Design competition for their 3D-printed proposal, Window to the Heart.

Envisioned as the “world’s largest lens,” the installation was in response to its location within one of the world’s most instagrammed places, Times Square. The 12-foot-diameter Fresnel lens, designed with 3D-printing manufacturer Formlabs and structural engineer Laufs Engineering Design, will capture the image of the square within the heart-shaped window at its center, bending and distorting the surround myriad lights and colors.

Edible Architecture Formed from Chocolate Using 3D Printed Moulds

14:00 - 9 January, 2018
Edible Architecture Formed from Chocolate Using 3D Printed Moulds, © Universal Favourite
© Universal Favourite

Universal Favourite have developed a range of modular chocolates Complementary that are formed in 3D printed moulds to satisfy any architect with a sweet tooth. The architectural forms have been developed to establish a connection between the two pieces to be eaten as one, complementing one and other.

© Universal Favourite © Universal Favourite © Universal Favourite © Universal Favourite © Universal Favourite © Universal Favourite © Universal Favourite © Universal Favourite © Universal Favourite © Universal Favourite + 22

5 Emerging Careers in Architecture Technology to Look Out for in 2018 and Beyond

09:30 - 4 January, 2018
5 Emerging Careers in Architecture Technology to Look Out for in 2018 and Beyond, Composite based on images by Pixabay users <a href='https://pixabay.com/en/building-reflection-window-glass-922529/'>LenaSevcikova</a> and <a href='https://pixabay.com/en/man-virtual-reality-samsung-gear-vr-1416140/'>HammerandTusk</a>
Composite based on images by Pixabay users LenaSevcikova and HammerandTusk

Even with tech like virtual reality, augmented reality, 3D printing, computational design and robotics already reshaping architecture practice, the design community is just scratching the surface of the potential of new technologies. Designers who recognize this and invest in building skills and expertise to maximize the use of these tools in the future will inherently become better architects, and position themselves for entirely new career paths as our profession evolves. It is a uniquely exciting moment for architecture to advance through innovative use of technology. Even just a decade ago, designers with interests in both architecture and technology were essentially required to pursue one or the other. Now, with architecture beginning to harness the power of cutting-edge technologies, these fields are no longer mutually exclusive. Rather than choose a preferred path, today’s architects are encouraged to embrace technology to become sought-out talent.

With much written about how technology is changing the way architects work and the products we can deliver to clients during a project’s lifecycle, there has been less focus on how technology is changing career opportunities in the profession. Architecture companies are now hiring roles that didn’t exist even three years ago. Here’s a look at five emerging career paths design technology will make possible in 2018 and the immediate future.

3D Printed Hexagonal Pods Could House New York City's Homeless

08:00 - 3 January, 2018
3D Printed Hexagonal Pods Could House New York City's Homeless , Courtesy of Framlab
Courtesy of Framlab

Across the world, homelessness in fast-paced metropolises such as New York City is at a record high since the Great Depression of the 1930s, more than 60,000 people are in shelters every night while many others must find a place to sleep on the streets, the subway or other public spaces. The real estate industry has caused the increasing rents and a high demand for any remaining plots; many of the new builds are luxury apartments, rather than the low-cost housing that is so desperately needed. As a result, thousands of people are forced onto the streets and charities struggle to provide adequate help for everyone. 

Mural artwork by Viktor Miller-Gausa. Image Courtesy of Framlab Courtesy of Framlab Courtesy of Framlab Courtesy of Framlab + 20

Over 30 Architectural Projects Represented In One 3D Object

08:00 - 11 December, 2017
Courtesy of Fumio Matsumoto
Courtesy of Fumio Matsumoto

Architect and Project Professor at The University of Tokyo, Fumio Matsumoto put together more than 30 iconic buildings into a single 3D printed object called, “Memories of Architecture.” Façades, exterior forms, interior spaces, and structures of significant architectural works were reproduced at 1:300 scale and merged together in order from old to new.

Courtesy of Fumio Matsumoto Courtesy of Fumio Matsumoto Courtesy of Fumio Matsumoto Courtesy of Fumio Matsumoto + 25

Work is Underway on The World's First 3D-Printed Metal Bridge

06:00 - 14 November, 2017
Work is Underway on The World's First 3D-Printed Metal Bridge, © MX3D
© MX3D

Dutch 3D-printing start-up MX3D has revealed new details about their plans to install the world’s first 3D-printed metal bridge over a historic canal in Amsterdam.

Originally slated to be built in place, further research concluded that the design would have placed too much stress of the canal walls. So it was back to the drawing board, and the studio, where the updated design is now under construction. Featuring complex curves and a 12-meter-span, the bridge is now being constructed by MX3D’s sophisticated 3D-printed robot. And with about one-third of the structure already completed, it is back on schedule for a late 2018 installation on Amsterdam’s Oudezijds Achterburgwal canal.

This 3D Printer, Designed Specifically for Architects, Is Surprisingly Easy to Use

10:15 - 16 October, 2017

Have you ever spent hours calibrating the nozzle of a 3D printer or preparing a print-ready file – only to find that the model has failed because of a missed zero-thickness wall? With this in mind, the Platonics Arka 3D printer currently being developed in Helsinki, Finland—has one simple goal: to remove all unnecessary set-up and technical processes by means of intelligent automation and, as a result, almost entirely eliminate the wasted time that architects and designers spend calibrating printers, or working up print-ready files.

© Platonics © Platonics © Platonics © Platonics + 9