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ArchDaily's Top 11 Projects in 11 Years

15:00 - 11 March, 2019
ArchDaily's Top 11 Projects in 11 Years, © Hufton+Crow
© Hufton+Crow

ArchDaily turns 11! To commemorate the occasion, we want to share with you the 11 projects most visited by our readers during this incredible journey. From the indisputable and timeless classics from of designers like Le Corbusier and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, to the pioneering works of architects such as Zaha Hadid and OMA, passing through the delicate work of Gabinete de Arquitectura, these 11 examples teach us valuable lessons about architecture, most importantly: how to design for specific requirements without losing the creativity and beauty of architectural design.

On behalf of ArchDaily, we want to thank you for sharing with us the best architecture in the world, helping us to inspire professionals from all over the world to build better cities.

Spotlight: Louis Kahn

03:30 - 20 February, 2019
Spotlight: Louis Kahn, Salk Institute. Image © Liao Yusheng
Salk Institute. Image © Liao Yusheng

Louis Kahn (February 20th 1901 – March 17th 1974) was one of the United States' greatest 20th century architects, known for combining Modernism with the weight and dignity of ancient monuments. Though he did not arrive at his distinctive style until his early 50s, and despite his death at the age of just 73, in a span of just two decades Kahn came to be considered by many as part of the pantheon of modernist architects which included Le Corbusier and Mies van der Rohe.

Salk Institute. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/dreamsjung/3021667238/'>Flickr user dreamsjung</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> Kimbell Art Museum. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/43508230@N00/3720242013/'>Flickr user grabadonut</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> National Assembly Building of Bangladesh. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:National_Assembly_of_Bangladesh,_Jatiyo_Sangsad_Bhaban,_2008,_8.JPG'>Wikimedia Commons user Lykantrop</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> Exeter Library (Class of 1945 Library) . Image via Wikimedia (Image from United States Library of Congress in public domain. Author Carol M Highsmith) + 17

Spotlight: Thom Mayne

03:30 - 19 January, 2019
Spotlight: Thom Mayne, Emerson College Los Angeles. Image © Iwan Baan
Emerson College Los Angeles. Image © Iwan Baan

The principal architect of LA firm Morphosis, Thom Mayne (born January 19, 1944) was the recipient of the 2005 Pritzker Prize and the 2013 AIA Gold Medal, and is known for his experimental architectural forms, often applying them to significant institutional buildings such as the New York's Cooper Union building, the Emerson College in Los Angeles and the Caltrans District 7 Headquarters.

Emerson College Los Angeles. Image © Iwan Baan Perot Museum. Image © Iwan Baan Cooper Union Building. Image © Iwan Baan Bill & Melinda Gates Hall. Image © Roland Halbe + 16

AD Classics: Salk Institute / Louis Kahn

16:30 - 11 January, 2019
AD Classics: Salk Institute / Louis Kahn, © Liao Yusheng
© Liao Yusheng

This article was originally published on August 27, 2017. To read the stories behind other celebrated architecture projects, visit our AD Classics section.

In 1959, Jonas Salk, the man who had discovered the vaccine for polio, approached Louis I. Kahn with a project. The city of San Diego, California had gifted him with a picturesque site in La Jolla along the Pacific coast, where Salk intended to found and build a biological research center. Salk, whose vaccine had already had a profound impact on the prevention of the disease, was adamant that the design for this new facility should explore the implications of the sciences for humanity. He also had a broader, if no less profound, directive for his chosen architect: to “create a facility worthy of a visit by Picasso.” The result was the Salk Institute, a facility lauded for both its functionality and its striking aesthetics – and the manner in which each supports the other.[1,2]

© Liao Yusheng © Liao Yusheng © Liao Yusheng © Liao Yusheng + 20

AD Classics: Vitra Design Museum / Gehry Partners

22:00 - 18 October, 2018
AD Classics: Vitra Design Museum / Gehry Partners, © Liao Yusheng
© Liao Yusheng

This article was originally published on April 27, 2017. To read the stories behind other celebrated architecture projects, visit our AD Classics section.

Even at the Vitra Campus in Weil-am-Rhein—a collection of furniture factories, offices, showrooms, and galleries, many of which are the products of iconic architects—the Vitra Design Museum stands out as exceptional. With its sculptural form composed of interconnected curving volumes, the museum is the unmistakable work of Frank Gehry – an architect who has built a legacy for himself upon such structures. What may not be immediately apparent is the crossroads that this serene white building represents: it was in this project at the southwestern corner of Germany (close to the Swiss border) that Gehry first realized a structure in the vein of his now signature style.

© Liao Yusheng © Liao Yusheng © Liao Yusheng © Liao Yusheng + 10

Spotlight: Tadao Ando

16:00 - 13 September, 2018
Spotlight: Tadao Ando, Church of the Light. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/hetgacom/22029029686'>Flickr user hetgacom</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a>
Church of the Light. Image © Flickr user hetgacom licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

As the recipient of the 1995 Pritzker Prize, Tadao Ando (born 13 September 1941) is highly regarded for his unparalleled work with concrete, sensitive treatment of natural light, and strong engagement with nature. Based in Osaka, Japan, Ando's ascetic yet rich version of modernism resonates with the traditional Japanese conception of architecture, and has caused him to be regularly referred to as a "critical regionalist."

Hyogo Prefectural Museum of Art. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hyogo_prefectural_museum_of_art08s3200.jpg'>Wikimedia user 663highland</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> The Langen Foundation. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Langen_Foundation_Neuss_02.jpg'>Wikimedia user Perlblau</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/de/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 2.0 DE</a> The Pulitzer Foundation. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Pulitzerfoundation.jpg'>Wikimedia user Garfield226</a> Licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> Church of the Light. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/hetgacom/22029029686'>Flickr user hetgacom</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> + 14

What is Deconstructivism?

09:30 - 12 August, 2018
What is Deconstructivism?, Tschumi's Parc de la Villette . Image Courtesy of The Architectural Review
Tschumi's Parc de la Villette . Image Courtesy of The Architectural Review

If we define “deconstructivism” (although it is not a verified word in the dictionary), it literally translates to the breaking down, or demolishing of a constructed structure, whether it being for structural reasons or just an act of rebellion. It is perhaps for this this reason that many misunderstand the Deconstructivist movement.

Deconstructivism is, in fact, not a new architecture style, nor is it an avant-garde movement against architecture or society. It does not follow “rules” or acquire specific aesthetics, nor is it a rebellion against a social dilemma. It is the unleashing of infinite possibilities of playing around with forms and volumes.

The City of Culture in Santiago de Compostela, Spain. Image Courtesy of Eisenman Architects Frank Gehry House. Image © Liao Yusheng Port offices of Antwerp, Zaha Hadid Architects. Image © Helene Binet Eisenman's The Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe. Image Courtesy of Flickr user dalbera licensed under CC BY 2.0 + 15

Spotlight: Pier Luigi Nervi

03:00 - 21 June, 2018
Spotlight: Pier Luigi Nervi, Palazzetto dello sport. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/ihavegotthestyle/221174130'>Flickr user ihavegotthestyle</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
Palazzetto dello sport. Image © Flickr user ihavegotthestyle licensed under CC BY 2.0

Known as both an architect and an engineer, Pier Luigi Nervi (June 21, 1891 – January 9, 1979) explored the limitations of reinforced concrete by creating a variety of inventive structural projects; in the process, he helped to show the material had a place in architecture movements of the coming years. Nervi began his career in a time of technological revolution, and through his ambition and ability to recognize opportunity in the midst of challenge, he was able to have an impact on several disciplines and cultures.

6 Materials That Age Beautifully

09:30 - 26 March, 2018
6 Materials That Age Beautifully, © Rory Gardiner
© Rory Gardiner

Often as architects we neglect how the buildings we design will develop once we hand them over to the elements. We spend so much time understanding how people will use the building that we may forget how it will be used and battered by the weather. It is an inevitable and uncertain process that raises the question of when is a building actually complete; when the final piece of furniture is moved in, when the final roof tile is placed or when it has spent years out in the open letting nature take its course?

Rather than detracting from the building, natural forces can add to the material’s integrity, softening its stark, characterless initial appearance. This continuation of the building process is an important one to consider in order to create a structure that will only grow in beauty over time. To help you achieve an ever-growing building, we have collated six different materials below that age with grace.

Spotlight: Frank Gehry

06:00 - 28 February, 2018
Spotlight: Frank Gehry, Walt Disney Concert Hall. Image Courtesy of Gehry Partners, LLP
Walt Disney Concert Hall. Image Courtesy of Gehry Partners, LLP

Internationally acclaimed architect Frank Gehry (born 28 February 1929) has been headlining architectural news platforms since he established his Los Angeles practice in 1962 and remodeled his home in Santa Monica. Notorious for his expressive use of form (and its-sometimes inflationary effect on project budgets), Gehry is best known for the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, which fellow architect Philip Johnson once dubbed “the greatest building of our time.”

Walt Disney Concert Hall. Image Courtesy of Gehry Partners, LLP Guggenheim Bilbao. Image © Peter Knaup Vitra Museum. Image © Liao Yusheng Fondation Louis Vuitton. Image © Todd Eberle + 19

Why the AIA is NOT Awarding Anyone the Twenty-Five Year Award in 2018

14:00 - 10 January, 2018
Why the AIA is NOT Awarding Anyone the Twenty-Five Year Award in 2018, © Koji Horiuchi. Courtesy of AIA
© Koji Horiuchi. Courtesy of AIA

We are starting the new year with an announcement from the American Institute of Architects that there will be no winner for their Twenty-five Year Award in 2018. This will be the first time this has occurred since the award was officially established in 1971. The AIA award recognises buildings that have “stood the test of time for 25-35 years and continues to set the standards of excellence for its architectural design and significance.”

Over the 46 years of the award, it has celebrated buildings by of Frank Lloyd Wright, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Louis Kahn and Charles and Ray Eames. Last year it was awarded to the Grand Louvre – Phase I by Pei Cobb Freed & Partners for its iconic stainless steel pyramid that “rivals the Eiffel Tower as one of France’s most recognisable architectural icons.”

Spotlight: John Hejduk

04:00 - 19 July, 2017
Wall House II, built 2001 in the Netherlands. Image © Liao Yusheng
Wall House II, built 2001 in the Netherlands. Image © Liao Yusheng

Artist, architect and architectural theorist John Hejduk (19 July 1929 - 3 July 2000) introduced new ways of thinking about space that are still highly influential in both modernist and post-modernist architecture today, especially among the large number of architects who were once his students. Inspired both by darker, gothic themes and modernist thinking on the human psyche, his relatively small collection of built work, and many of his unbuilt plans and drawings, have gone on to inspire other projects and architects around the world. In addition, his drawing, writing and teaching have gone on to shape the meeting of modernist and postmodern influences in contemporary architecture and helped bring psychological approaches to the forefront of design.

Interview With Thom Mayne: “I Am a Pragmatic Idealist”

09:30 - 9 May, 2017
Interview With Thom Mayne: “I Am a Pragmatic Idealist”, Emerson College Los Angeles, 2014. Image © Iwan Baan
Emerson College Los Angeles, 2014. Image © Iwan Baan

For many observers, Thom Mayne might easily be considered the most unpredictable personality in architecture. Once labeled the “bad boy of architecture” by critics—a moniker which he has, at times, enthusiastically adopted and even encouraged—Mayne's actions in the architecture world can range from something as responsible as designing one of the United States' most sustainable university campuses to something as outrageous as proposing one of the world's tallest towers in a revered Austrian mountain town. In this interview, the latest from Vladimir Belogolovsky's “City of Ideas” series, Mayne discusses his ideas, his past statements on architecture, and where he thinks the profession will go next. The interview was originally published by the Berlin-based SPEECH Magazine.

Diamond Ranch High School, 2000. Image © Brandon Welling The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art, 2006. Image © Iwan Baan       Bill & Melinda Gates Hall, 2014. Image © Doublespace Photography  Four-Towers-in-One competition proposal for Shenzhen. Image Courtesy of Morphosis + 34

Six 'Cathedrals of Culture' Tell Their Stories in New 3D Film

00:00 - 30 November, 2014

If buildings could talk, what would they say about us? Cathedrals of Culture, a six part collection of films recently premiered at this year's Berlin International Film Festival, "offers six startling responses to this question". The project, filmed entirely in 3D, allows "six iconic and very different buildings to speak for themselves, examining human life from the unblinking perspective of a manmade structure".

New Republic Honors Great Thinker Louis Kahn

00:00 - 21 November, 2014
New Republic Honors Great Thinker Louis Kahn, AD Classics: Salk Institute / Louis Kahn. Image © Liao Yusheng
AD Classics: Salk Institute / Louis Kahn. Image © Liao Yusheng

New Republic has presented a list of 100 great thinkers from the past 100 years. The list, as the magazine puts it, honors “people we believe have made the greatest intellectual contributions to the fields and causes that this magazine holds dear.” One of these fields is architecture, and New Republic’s honoree for that category is the illustrious Louis Kahn. Kahn is famous for projects such as the Kimbell Museum and the Salk Institute. His work displays what architecture critic Sarah Williams Goldhagen describes as a “cognitively rich, metaphorically complex, multi-sensorial approach.” Curious to see who else made the list? See the full roster here!

10 Modernist Buildings Receive Conservation Grants from Getty Foundation

00:00 - 19 September, 2014
10 Modernist Buildings Receive Conservation Grants from Getty Foundation, Luce Memorial Chapel, Taichung, Taiwan / I.M. Pei. Image © Anonymous Blogger
Luce Memorial Chapel, Taichung, Taiwan / I.M. Pei. Image © Anonymous Blogger

The Getty Foundation has named the first 10 recipients of its philanthropic “Keeping It Modern” initiative, which aims to advance the understanding and preservation of 20th-century modern architecture. From Louis Kahn’s Salk Institute to Le Corbusier’s Parisian apartment, each recipient has been chosen for their architectural significance and potential to advance conservation practices related to modern architecture.

View all 10 projects, after the break...

Getty Conservation Institute to Help Conserve Louis Kahn’s Salk Institute

00:00 - 25 August, 2014
Getty Conservation Institute to Help Conserve Louis Kahn’s Salk Institute , © Liao Yusheng
© Liao Yusheng

The Getty Conservation Institute (GCI) is partnering with the Salk Institute to help develop techniques for conserving one of Louis Kahn’s finest works. Overlooking the Pacific coast in La Jolla, California, Kahn took advantage of the peaceful surroundings and natural light when he designed the Salk Institute site. However, these same marine elements also provide unique conservation challenges for the concrete and wood structure, particularly for its teak window walls, the Getty Trust reports.

Part of the GCI’s Conserving Modern Architecture Initiative, the project will determine the condition of the teak and develop recommendations for its treatment and long-term conservation. “Partnering with the Salk Institute on this conservation challenge will assist in developing new approaches for practitioners in conserving other icons of modern architecture, which makes it a terrific project for us,” said Susan Macdonald, Head of Field Projects at the GCI.

Read on after the break to learn more about the conservation initiative.

ArchDaily Editors Select: Our Favorite Projects in the USA

01:00 - 4 July, 2014
ArchDaily Editors Select: Our Favorite Projects in the USA

Happy 4th of July! To celebrate the USA's Independence Day, our editors have selected their favorite projects located in the USA, from architecture classics to extraordinary newcomers. Enjoy them all, after the break!