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Thesis

"Plastic Island" Imagines the Possibilities of Reusing Oceanic Waste in Architecture

05:00 - 1 November, 2018
Courtesy of Emily-Claire Goksøyr
Courtesy of Emily-Claire Goksøyr

With rising sea levels and incessant consumption of plastic, the state of the earth's oceans is rapidly deteriorating. Instead of discarding or burning this plastic, architects Erik Goksøyr and Emily-Claire Goksøyr questioned whether any architectural potential exists in this neglected material. By conducting an extensive material study, the duo designed three prototypes to postulate this theory. 

Though starting out as a humble thesis, this project is being actualized under the organization, Out of Ocean. From the shores of the Koster Islands in Sweden, plastic samples were collected and studied for their various material performance in areas such as color, texture, light, and translucency.

Courtesy of Emily-Claire Goksøyr Courtesy of Emily-Claire Goksøyr Courtesy of Emily-Claire Goksøyr Courtesy of Emily-Claire Goksøyr + 36

UnIATA - Unfuse International Architecture Thesis Awards 2018

08:45 - 27 September, 2017
UnIATA - Unfuse International Architecture Thesis Awards 2018, UnIATA - Best Architecture Thesis Ever Created
UnIATA - Best Architecture Thesis Ever Created

UNFUSE serves as a platform to create a global community of architects and designers who are pushing the boundaries of architecture discipline to enrich our built environment. At UNFUSE we promote exceptional works, ideas, experimentations in the field of architecture, landscape, urban Design, society, culture and ecology.

"Faith Estates" Proposes a New Approach to Religious Pilgrimage by Excavating Holy Sites

09:30 - 27 June, 2017
Machaerus religious development. Image © Akarachai Padlom, Eleftherios Sergios, Nasser Alamadi
Machaerus religious development. Image © Akarachai Padlom, Eleftherios Sergios, Nasser Alamadi

In a time of what seems to be ever-increasing religious and political conflict, Bartlett students Akarachai Padlom, Eleftherios Sergios, and Nasser Alamadi instead chose to focus on collaboration between religions in their thesis project entitled “Faith Estates,” which outlines a new method of mass religious tourism. In an area around the Dead Sea characterized by disputed boundaries and conflicting ownership claims, the group aims to reimagine the relationship between the world’s three monotheistic religions, but also to rethink the relationship between religion, tourism, and the landscape. The design consists of large-scale excavation sites which form tourist resorts along a pilgrimage route with the goal of forming a mutually beneficial relationship.

Dead Sea secular development. Image © Akarachai Padlom, Eleftherios Sergios, Nasser Alamadi The processional route toward Machaerus. Image © Akarachai Padlom, Eleftherios Sergios, Nasser Alamadi Horkania archaeological development. Image © Akarachai Padlom, Eleftherios Sergios, Nasser Alamadi Dead Sea development. Image © Akarachai Padlom, Eleftherios Sergios, Nasser Alamadi + 19

Self-Aware Nanobots Form Futurist Megastructures in this Thesis Project from the AA

09:30 - 16 August, 2015
Self-Aware Nanobots Form Futurist Megastructures in this Thesis Project from the AA, Courtesy of Dmytro Aranchii
Courtesy of Dmytro Aranchii

Architecture is a swarm, and a self aware one at that. That's the vision presented by noMad: a built environment made of Buckminster Fuller-like geometric structures that compile themselves entirely autonomously, according to data gathered and processed by the units. Developed by Architectural Association students Dmytro Aranchii, Paul Bart, Yuqiu Jiang, and Flavia Santos, on a basic level noMad's concept is fairly simple - a small unit of motors that is attached to several magnetic faces, which can be reoriented into different shapes. Put multiple units together, however, and noMad's vision becomes an entirely new form of architecture: non-finite, mobile and infinitely adaptable.

Courtesy of Dmytro Aranchii Courtesy of Dmytro Aranchii Courtesy of Dmytro Aranchii Courtesy of Dmytro Aranchii + 21

"Engineered Paradises" Takes an Imagined Look into the Possibilities Between Palestine and Israel

14:00 - 5 July, 2015
"Engineered Paradises" Takes an Imagined Look into the Possibilities Between Palestine and Israel, Engineered Paradises - a thesis by Zarith Pineda at Tulane University. Image Courtesy of Zarith Pineda
Engineered Paradises - a thesis by Zarith Pineda at Tulane University. Image Courtesy of Zarith Pineda

“Engineered Paradises”, a thesis by Zarith Pineda from Tulane University, looks into a possible future for Hebron, exploring the condition where peace never comes to the West Bank, but where the mutual destruction of both sides is addressed through the creation of safe spaces for the expression of universal emotions. The thesis proposes that in this way, both parties may be unified by their plight. The project was created based on observation of the city of Hebron and on-site interviews with Hebronites. Their true stories then became the narrative dictating the program of the project.