All
Projects
Products
Events
Competitions
  1. ArchDaily
  2. Editor's Choice

Editor's Choice

Upcycling Wood: Disused Materials Transformed Into Valuable And Useful Objects

07:00 - 17 May, 2019
Upcycling Wood: Disused Materials Transformed Into Valuable And Useful Objects, 'Taburetes Sociales'. Design by Curro Claret, Arrels Fundació and collaborators. Image © Juan Lemus
'Taburetes Sociales'. Design by Curro Claret, Arrels Fundació and collaborators. Image © Juan Lemus

The need to substantially reduce our impact on the planet must be translated into a significant change to our lifestyle and habits. One of these is to consume responsibly and consider that waste does not exist, but that all material can be transformed into something useful again following a circular ecological system.

In his book Upcycling Wood, Reutilización creativa de la madera, the architect and artist Bruno Sève writes and edits a non-exhaustive guide of the uses and possibilities of recovered wood, as a framework for responsible reuse; from small scale, such as furniture or artists' canvases, to medium scale, with its use in interiors and facades. This book seeks to raise awareness among professionals and citizens in general through analysis of the life cycle, examples of uses and finishing processes, leading to an ecological and responsible framework. The book is illustrated by numerous design and architecture teams who follow the guidelines of ecological design with reclaimed wood.

Hotel Lobby and Nishi Grand Stair Interior / March Studio. Image © John Gollings 'San Cristóbal', by Bruno Sève. Image © Bruno Sève © Uhuru Recycling Woodstore. Image © The Community wood recycling + 20

How Designing for Air Quality May Determine the Outcome of Your Meeting

04:00 - 16 May, 2019
How Designing for Air Quality May Determine the Outcome of Your Meeting, © Max Lee. ImageRain of Light / Yuan Architects
© Max Lee. ImageRain of Light / Yuan Architects

Humans can survive for 30 days without eating, 3 days without drinking, yet only 3 minutes without breathing. Of course our need for air is also constant, we rely on it at all times indoors and outdoors although can often be less clean than we would hope. Unpleasant odors make us aware of bad air, but many irritants and unhealthy gases are not easily detectable by smell while still affecting our health. Smells are the most obvious signal, as they are consciously perceived by the brain and nervous system, allowing us to make judgements about our environment.

Learn more about where poor indoor air quality comes from, why it's important to address within the built environment, and how to design for good indoor air quality and comfort.

© Vivek Muthuramalingam. ImageBiome Environmental Solutions © Javier Callejas. ImageAlberto Campo Baeza © Ishita Sitwala. ImageDesign Work Group  © Nelson Kon. ImageMipibu House / Terra e Tuma Arquitetos Associados. Image + 17

Neil Denari on The High Line, Urban Design and Experimental Music

10:00 - 12 May, 2019
Neil Denari on The High Line, Urban Design and Experimental Music, @ The Midnight Charette
@ The Midnight Charette

The Midnight Charette is an explicit podcast about design, architecture, and the everyday. Hosted by architectural designers David Lee and Marina Bourderonnet, it features a variety of creative professionals in unscripted and long-format conversations that allow for thoughtful takes and more personal discussions. Honesty and humor are used to cover a wide array of subjects: some episodes provide useful tips for designers, while others are project reviews, interviews, or simply explorations of everyday life and design. The Midnight Charette is available for free on iTunes, YouTube, Spotify, and all other podcast directories.

Tallinn Architecture Biennale Announces the Programme for TAB 2019

10:00 - 11 May, 2019
Tallinn Architecture Biennale Announces the Programme for TAB 2019, The winner of the Installation Program “Huts and Habitats”: Steampunk, designed by Soomeen Hahm Design, Igor Pantic, and Fologram. Image Courtesy of Tallinn Architecture Biennale
The winner of the Installation Program “Huts and Habitats”: Steampunk, designed by Soomeen Hahm Design, Igor Pantic, and Fologram. Image Courtesy of Tallinn Architecture Biennale

TAB 2019, Tallinn’s 5th Architecture Biennale, will commence with its Opening Week from September 5-11, 2019. Earlier this week, the Biennale announced its programme of events for this year’s festival, which bears the theme “Beauty Matters: The Resurgence of Beauty”. TAB is an international celebration of architecture, organized by the Estonian Centre for Architecture and curated this year by Head Curator Dr. Yael Reisner. The Biennale consists of five main events, to take place in various venues in the heart of Tallinn, as well as a Satellite Programme hosting other events around the city.

TAB 2015 Installation by Sille Pihlak and Siim Tuksam. Image © Tõnu Tunnel TAB 2017 installation by Gilles Retsin. Image © NAARO TAB 2017 Curatorial Exhibition ecoLogicStudio. Image © NAARO TAB 2017 Curatorial Exhibition. Image © NAARO + 12

Never miss a good story - subscribe to our daily newsletter.

What to Know Before Tackling a Renovation Project

06:30 - 9 May, 2019
What to Know Before Tackling a Renovation Project, Battersea Arts Centre by Haworth Tompkins. Image © Fred Howarth
Battersea Arts Centre by Haworth Tompkins. Image © Fred Howarth

As technology moves forward, so does architecture and construction. Architects, designers, and planners around the world now have infinite tools and resources to design and build the cities of today and the future.  As promising as this may sound, new construction is also consuming our world’s limited resources faster than we can replenish them.

This situation leaves architects with an important responsibility: the rehabilitation and reuse of the existing built environment. This means using creative thinking and design to save and incorporate old or historic buildings that currently exist, in the present and future of our cities, by adapting them through creative and sensitive treatments.

11 Ways to Become a Better Architect (Without Doing Architecture)

04:30 - 2 May, 2019
11 Ways to Become a Better Architect (Without Doing Architecture), © Ariana Zilliacus
© Ariana Zilliacus

Architects are often noted for having bad work-life balance, a lot of stress and little free time. How can you take time off while still improving your skills as an architect? Can that time off even give you an extra edge? Compared to other fields, architecture stands out as a field in which you need to “know a little bit about everything." Thus, in order to live up to our name we must also do a little bit of everything, and as they say, a little goes a long way. So with that in mind, here are 11 activities which, while not obviously architectural, just might make you a better architect.

Dvorulitsa Project by Meganom Proposes Reinvesting in Cities' Peripheries to Improve Urban Environments

05:15 - 26 April, 2019
Dvorulitsa Project by Meganom Proposes Reinvesting in Cities' Peripheries to Improve Urban Environments, After. Image © Dvorulitsa
After. Image © Dvorulitsa

Superpark. Image © Meganom After. Image © Dvorulitsa After. Image © Dvorulitsa © Dvorulitsa + 16

Amidst efforts to revitalize and improve urban centers, the peripheral areas of cities are often ignored or forgotten. The intense focus on the downtown core means, in terms of land use, that only a relatively small area receives the majority of designers’ attention. "Dvorulitsa" (literally "Yardstreet" in Russian) is an urban development strategy proposed by Russian architecture firm Meganom, aiming to shift that focus. Taking the idea of the “superpark” from the 2013 study, "Archaeology of the Periphery," the yardstreet project presents an alternative method of viewing the periphery of a post-soviet city.

When Sunlight Meets Tadao Ando’s Concrete

06:30 - 18 April, 2019
When Sunlight Meets Tadao Ando’s Concrete, Vitra Conference Pavilion, Weil am Rhein / Germany. Image © Vitra, by Richard Bryant
Vitra Conference Pavilion, Weil am Rhein / Germany. Image © Vitra, by Richard Bryant

Koshino House, Ashiya-shi / Japan. Image © Kazunori Fujimoto Church of the Light, Osaka / Japan. Image © Naoya Fujii Modern Art Museum, Fort Worth / USA. Image © Todd Landry Photography Screenshot of video of Hill of the Buddha at the Makomanai Takino Cemetery, Sapporo / Japan. Image © Hokkaido Fan Magazine + 8

If there is any consistent factor in his work, says Pritzker-winning architect Tadao Ando, then it is the pursuit of light. Ando’s complex choreography of light fascinates most when the viewer experiences the sensitive transitions within his architecture. Sometimes walls wait calmly for the moment to reveal striking shadow patterns, and other times water reflections animate unobtrusively solid surfaces. His combination of traditional Japanese architecture with a vocabulary of modernism has contributed greatly to critical regionalism. While he is concerned with individual solutions that have a respect for local sites and contexts Ando’s famous buildings – such as the Church of the Light, Koshino House or the Water Temple – link the notion of regional identity with a modern imagining of space, material and light. Shoji walls with diffuse light are reinterpreted in the context of another culture, for instance, filtered through the lens of Rome’s ancient Pantheon, where daylight floods through an oculus. Ando’s masterly imagination culminates in planning spatial sequences of light and dark like he envisioned for the Fondation d’Art Contemporain François Pinault in Paris.

"MAKE IT ISO!", A Series of Isometrics Based on Iconic Movies and TV Series

04:00 - 18 April, 2019
"MAKE IT ISO!", A Series of Isometrics Based on Iconic Movies and TV Series, © Riccardo Masiero
© Riccardo Masiero

© Riccardo Masiero © Riccardo Masiero © Riccardo Masiero © Riccardo Masiero + 13

The passion for cinema and TV shows, combined with that for scenography and architecture, led Italian architect Riccardo Masiero to play with the different spaces and dimensions of the elements that make movies in order to create "MAKE IT ISO!", a series of drawings portraying famous movies and TV icons such as Breaking Bad, Twin Peaks, Harry Potter, Star Wars, The Shining and UP in an architectural way.

These illustrations represent iconic scenes of TV and cinema through the isometric illustration method, giving an overall picture of the construction of the scene, as well as providing a different point of view to the observer.  

Keep reading to see the full "MAKE IT ISO!" series and the author explaining his work.

“Intuition Must Be Grounded to The Site and Context”: In Conversation with Oscar Ko of Interval Architects 

06:00 - 14 April, 2019
“Intuition Must Be Grounded to The Site and Context”: In Conversation with Oscar Ko of Interval Architects , Tower of Bricks. Image Courtesy of Oscar Ko
Tower of Bricks. Image Courtesy of Oscar Ko

Oscar Ko was born in Harbin, China and moved with his parents to Hong Kong at the age of five. He earned his Bachelor of Science in Architecture at the University of Michigan and Master’s from Columbia University in 2006. After spending seven years in America, he relocated to Europe where his original plan was to stay for four-five years or longer but after talking to older friends practicing in China he quickly realized that there are more opportunities in his native China. After working for less than two years for several prestigious firms – Josep Lluis Mateo Architects in Barcelona, David Chipperfield Architects in Berlin, and Space Group Architects in Oslo, Norway – he returned to China where he worked at two leading Beijing-based practices: Studio Zhu-Pei and Chiasmus Partners for several years.

Raffles Kindergarten. Image Courtesy of Oscar Ko Tower of Bricks. Image Courtesy of Oscar Ko Raffles Kindergarten. Image Courtesy of Oscar Ko One Half Stadium + 32

Top 5 Courtyard Installations at Milan Design Week Through the Lens of Laurian Ghinitoiu

06:30 - 13 April, 2019
Top 5 Courtyard Installations at Milan Design Week Through the Lens of Laurian Ghinitoiu, Conifera by COS x Mamou-Mani. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Conifera by COS x Mamou-Mani. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

Over the past few days, exceptional products have been exhibited at the Salone del Mobile, ranging from furniture pieces and light fixtures, to textiles and finishes. As part of Milan Design Week, the Salone saw impressive collaborations with architects and the use of never-seen-before materials, all displayed at the Milan Fairgrounds, while some projects — too grand and imposing for a constraint exhibition — took place at the second part of the event, the Fuorisalone.

Take a look at some of the most remarkable outdoor installations at the Milan Design Week 2019 captured by the lens of architectural photographer Laurian Ghinitoiu.

Temporary Exhibition by Space Encounters. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu Conifera by COS x Mamou-Mani. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu Echo by Pezo von Ellrichshausen . Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu La Foresta dei Violini by Piuarch. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 22

What Makes a Great Public Place?

06:30 - 12 April, 2019
What Makes a Great Public Place?, A crowd of locals watch a movie at Discovery Green, Houston, TX, USA. Image Courtesy of PPS
A crowd of locals watch a movie at Discovery Green, Houston, TX, USA. Image Courtesy of PPS

This article was originally published by Project for Public Spaces as "What makes a successful place?", a brief guideline about how to develop great public spaces by following four qualities: Sociability, Uses & Activities, Access & Linkages, and Comfort & Image.

Great public spaces are those places where celebrations are held, social and economic exchanges occur, friends run into each other, and cultures mix. They are the “front porches” of our public institutions – libraries, field houses, schools – where we interact with each other and government. When these spaces work well, they serve as the stage for our public lives, but what makes some places succeed while others fail?

A Soviet Union of Historic Images

05:00 - 9 April, 2019
A Soviet Union of Historic Images, @ Tamara Stoffers. ImageSparrow Hills
@ Tamara Stoffers. ImageSparrow Hills

What would historic cities look like if scale didn’t exist and functions were manipulated?

Dutch artist Tamara Stoffers found inspiration from an old Soviet Union book published in the early 1960s, which featured images of mass-housing apartment blocks without any ornamentation or color. The book highlighted the symmetry and functionality of Soviet architecture, representing what a communist future strived to look like. It became clear to her that a lot of stories lie in the history of USSR that deserve to be explored.

Stoffers' admiration extended beyond Russian architecture, looking at everyday objects, banners, postcards, and books. In a matter of 4-5 years, she put together a series of surreal collages taken from more than 30 picture books. The images, which seemed intriguing on their own, were mixed and matched with complementary photographs in an exaggerated, amusing way, presenting the Soviet Union as never seen before.

Kalinin Prospekt. Image © Tamara Stoffers Voronezh. Image © Tamara Stoffers Baku. Image © Tamara Stoffers Cathedral of St. Sophia. Image © Tamara Stoffers + 15

How Modular Construction Could Offer a Lasting Solution in the Affordable Housing Crisis

07:00 - 15 March, 2019

This article was originally published in Autodesk's Redshift publication as "How Building Modular Homes can Help Fill the Affordable Housing Gap."

“Modular” isn’t a construction product; it’s a construction process. This is according to Tom Hardiman, executive director of the Modular Building Institute (MBI), whose members include more than 350 companies involved in the manufacturing and distribution of modular buildings, including multifamily homes.

From Climate Change to Global South: 11 Editors Choose 11 of our Best Articles

05:30 - 14 March, 2019
From Climate Change to Global South: 11 Editors Choose 11 of our Best Articles, Sergei Tchoban's drawing inspired by ArchDaily's logo back in 2017. Image © Sergei Tchoban
Sergei Tchoban's drawing inspired by ArchDaily's logo back in 2017. Image © Sergei Tchoban

Back in 2008, ArchDaily embarked on a challenging mission: to provide inspiration, knowledge, and tools to the architects tasked with designing cities. In an effort to further align our strategy with these challenges, we recently introduced monthly themes in order to dig deeper into topics we find relevant in today’s architectural discourse. From architects who don't design to reframing climate change as a global issue, we are celebrating our 11th birthday by asking 11 editors and curators to choose ArchDaily's most inspiring articles.

Winners of the 2019 Building of the Year Awards

07:00 - 12 March, 2019
Winners of the 2019 Building of the Year Awards

More than 80,000 votes were cast over the last two weeks and, after careful review, the results of the 2019 ArchDaily Building of the Year Awards presented by Unreal are in. Building of the Year, which itself celebrated ten years this year, is the largest peer-based crowdsourced architecture award in the world, showcasing the projects chosen by you, our readers, as the most significant of the year.

This is no mean feat. More than 4000 projects were in contention this year, challenging readers to carefully consider a wide variety of projects across type, scale, and location. 4000 projects were whittled to 75 finalists; 75 have now been reduced to the 15 winners - one for each typological category.

The results are as diverse as the architecture itself. Well-known names are, as in years past, present among the bunch, among them Zaha Hadid Architects, MVRDV, and Heatherwick Studio. For London-based Heatherwick, their win marks the second consecutive year they have taken top honors for a refurbishment-based project. But less-renowned names dominate the ranks of the winners this year. Innocad’s serenely simple office building for a real estate company elevates what corporate architecture can be while the technical and material mastery of Sameep Padora’s Maya Somaiya Library is enough to make any architect look twice. The library is, in fact, one of two Indian projects to take top honors this year - a strong first year showing for the nation whose design talent seems finally to be coming to the fore.

But for all their many beautiful differences, the winners share a crucial element in common: they represent the values of our mission, to bring inspiration, knowledge, and tools to architects everywhere. Building of the Year - indeed, ArchDaily itself - would not be possible without the generosity of firms and readers as invested in our mission as we are. We give our profound thanks to all who participated this year, no matter the form. Congratulations to all the winners!



You've started following your first account!

Did you know?

You'll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.