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Editor's Choice

When Sunlight Meets Tadao Ando’s Concrete

06:30 - 18 April, 2019
When Sunlight Meets Tadao Ando’s Concrete, Vitra Conference Pavilion, Weil am Rhein / Germany. Image © Vitra, by Richard Bryant
Vitra Conference Pavilion, Weil am Rhein / Germany. Image © Vitra, by Richard Bryant

Koshino House, Ashiya-shi / Japan. Image © Kazunori Fujimoto Church of the Light, Osaka / Japan. Image © Naoya Fujii Modern Art Museum, Fort Worth / USA. Image © Todd Landry Photography Screenshot of video of Hill of the Buddha at the Makomanai Takino Cemetery, Sapporo / Japan. Image © Hokkaido Fan Magazine + 8

If there is any consistent factor in his work, says Pritzker-winning architect Tadao Ando, then it is the pursuit of light. Ando’s complex choreography of light fascinates most when the viewer experiences the sensitive transitions within his architecture. Sometimes walls wait calmly for the moment to reveal striking shadow patterns, and other times water reflections animate unobtrusively solid surfaces. His combination of traditional Japanese architecture with a vocabulary of modernism has contributed greatly to critical regionalism. While he is concerned with individual solutions that have a respect for local sites and contexts Ando’s famous buildings – such as the Church of the Light, Koshino House or the Water Temple – link the notion of regional identity with a modern imagining of space, material and light. Shoji walls with diffuse light are reinterpreted in the context of another culture, for instance, filtered through the lens of Rome’s ancient Pantheon, where daylight floods through an oculus. Ando’s masterly imagination culminates in planning spatial sequences of light and dark like he envisioned for the Fondation d’Art Contemporain François Pinault in Paris.

"MAKE IT ISO!", A Series of Isometrics Based on Iconic Movies and TV Series

04:00 - 18 April, 2019
"MAKE IT ISO!", A Series of Isometrics Based on Iconic Movies and TV Series, © Riccardo Masiero
© Riccardo Masiero

© Riccardo Masiero © Riccardo Masiero © Riccardo Masiero © Riccardo Masiero + 13

The passion for cinema and TV shows, combined with that for scenography and architecture, led Italian architect Riccardo Masiero to play with the different spaces and dimensions of the elements that make movies in order to create "MAKE IT ISO!", a series of drawings portraying famous movies and TV icons such as Breaking Bad, Twin Peaks, Harry Potter, Star Wars, The Shining and UP in an architectural way.

These illustrations represent iconic scenes of TV and cinema through the isometric illustration method, giving an overall picture of the construction of the scene, as well as providing a different point of view to the observer.  

Keep reading to see the full "MAKE IT ISO!" series and the author explaining his work.

“Intuition Must Be Grounded to The Site and Context”: In Conversation with Oscar Ko of Interval Architects 

06:00 - 14 April, 2019
“Intuition Must Be Grounded to The Site and Context”: In Conversation with Oscar Ko of Interval Architects , Tower of Bricks. Image Courtesy of Oscar Ko
Tower of Bricks. Image Courtesy of Oscar Ko

Oscar Ko was born in Harbin, China and moved with his parents to Hong Kong at the age of five. He earned his Bachelor of Science in Architecture at the University of Michigan and Master’s from Columbia University in 2006. After spending seven years in America, he relocated to Europe where his original plan was to stay for four-five years or longer but after talking to older friends practicing in China he quickly realized that there are more opportunities in his native China. After working for less than two years for several prestigious firms – Josep Lluis Mateo Architects in Barcelona, David Chipperfield Architects in Berlin, and Space Group Architects in Oslo, Norway – he returned to China where he worked at two leading Beijing-based practices: Studio Zhu-Pei and Chiasmus Partners for several years.

Raffles Kindergarten. Image Courtesy of Oscar Ko Tower of Bricks. Image Courtesy of Oscar Ko Raffles Kindergarten. Image Courtesy of Oscar Ko One Half Stadium + 32

Top 5 Courtyard Installations at Milan Design Week Through the Lens of Laurian Ghinitoiu

06:30 - 13 April, 2019
Top 5 Courtyard Installations at Milan Design Week Through the Lens of Laurian Ghinitoiu, Conifera by COS x Mamou-Mani. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Conifera by COS x Mamou-Mani. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

Over the past few days, exceptional products have been exhibited at the Salone del Mobile, ranging from furniture pieces and light fixtures, to textiles and finishes. As part of Milan Design Week, the Salone saw impressive collaborations with architects and the use of never-seen-before materials, all displayed at the Milan Fairgrounds, while some projects — too grand and imposing for a constraint exhibition — took place at the second part of the event, the Fuorisalone.

Take a look at some of the most remarkable outdoor installations at the Milan Design Week 2019 captured by the lens of architectural photographer Laurian Ghinitoiu.

Temporary Exhibition by Space Encounters. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu Conifera by COS x Mamou-Mani. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu Echo by Pezo von Ellrichshausen . Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu La Foresta dei Violini by Piuarch. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 22

What Makes a Great Public Place?

06:30 - 12 April, 2019
What Makes a Great Public Place?, A crowd of locals watch a movie at Discovery Green, Houston, TX, USA. Image Courtesy of PPS
A crowd of locals watch a movie at Discovery Green, Houston, TX, USA. Image Courtesy of PPS

This article was originally published by Project for Public Spaces as "What makes a successful place?", a brief guideline about how to develop great public spaces by following four qualities: Sociability, Uses & Activities, Access & Linkages, and Comfort & Image.

Great public spaces are those places where celebrations are held, social and economic exchanges occur, friends run into each other, and cultures mix. They are the “front porches” of our public institutions – libraries, field houses, schools – where we interact with each other and government. When these spaces work well, they serve as the stage for our public lives, but what makes some places succeed while others fail?

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A Soviet Union of Historic Images

05:00 - 9 April, 2019
A Soviet Union of Historic Images, @ Tamara Stoffers. ImageSparrow Hills
@ Tamara Stoffers. ImageSparrow Hills

What would historic cities look like if scale didn’t exist and functions were manipulated?

Dutch artist Tamara Stoffers found inspiration from an old Soviet Union book published in the early 1960s, which featured images of mass-housing apartment blocks without any ornamentation or color. The book highlighted the symmetry and functionality of Soviet architecture, representing what a communist future strived to look like. It became clear to her that a lot of stories lie in the history of USSR that deserve to be explored.

Stoffers' admiration extended beyond Russian architecture, looking at everyday objects, banners, postcards, and books. In a matter of 4-5 years, she put together a series of surreal collages taken from more than 30 picture books. The images, which seemed intriguing on their own, were mixed and matched with complementary photographs in an exaggerated, amusing way, presenting the Soviet Union as never seen before.

Kalinin Prospekt. Image © Tamara Stoffers Voronezh. Image © Tamara Stoffers Baku. Image © Tamara Stoffers Cathedral of St. Sophia. Image © Tamara Stoffers + 15

How Modular Construction Could Offer a Lasting Solution in the Affordable Housing Crisis

07:00 - 15 March, 2019

This article was originally published in Autodesk's Redshift publication as "How Building Modular Homes can Help Fill the Affordable Housing Gap."

“Modular” isn’t a construction product; it’s a construction process. This is according to Tom Hardiman, executive director of the Modular Building Institute (MBI), whose members include more than 350 companies involved in the manufacturing and distribution of modular buildings, including multifamily homes.

From Climate Change to Global South: 11 Editors Choose 11 of our Best Articles

05:30 - 14 March, 2019
From Climate Change to Global South: 11 Editors Choose 11 of our Best Articles, Sergei Tchoban's drawing inspired by ArchDaily's logo back in 2017. Image © Sergei Tchoban
Sergei Tchoban's drawing inspired by ArchDaily's logo back in 2017. Image © Sergei Tchoban

Back in 2008, ArchDaily embarked on a challenging mission: to provide inspiration, knowledge, and tools to the architects tasked with designing cities. In an effort to further align our strategy with these challenges, we recently introduced monthly themes in order to dig deeper into topics we find relevant in today’s architectural discourse. From architects who don't design to reframing climate change as a global issue, we are celebrating our 11th birthday by asking 11 editors and curators to choose ArchDaily's most inspiring articles.

Winners of the 2019 Building of the Year Awards

07:00 - 12 March, 2019
Winners of the 2019 Building of the Year Awards

More than 80,000 votes were cast over the last two weeks and, after careful review, the results of the 2019 ArchDaily Building of the Year Awards presented by Unreal are in. Building of the Year, which itself celebrated ten years this year, is the largest peer-based crowdsourced architecture award in the world, showcasing the projects chosen by you, our readers, as the most significant of the year.

This is no mean feat. More than 4000 projects were in contention this year, challenging readers to carefully consider a wide variety of projects across type, scale, and location. 4000 projects were whittled to 75 finalists; 75 have now been reduced to the 15 winners - one for each typological category.

The results are as diverse as the architecture itself. Well-known names are, as in years past, present among the bunch, among them Zaha Hadid Architects, MVRDV, and Heatherwick Studio. For London-based Heatherwick, their win marks the second consecutive year they have taken top honors for a refurbishment-based project. But less-renowned names dominate the ranks of the winners this year. Innocad’s serenely simple office building for a real estate company elevates what corporate architecture can be while the technical and material mastery of Sameep Padora’s Maya Somaiya Library is enough to make any architect look twice. The library is, in fact, one of two Indian projects to take top honors this year - a strong first year showing for the nation whose design talent seems finally to be coming to the fore.

But for all their many beautiful differences, the winners share a crucial element in common: they represent the values of our mission, to bring inspiration, knowledge, and tools to architects everywhere. Building of the Year - indeed, ArchDaily itself - would not be possible without the generosity of firms and readers as invested in our mission as we are. We give our profound thanks to all who participated this year, no matter the form. Congratulations to all the winners!



“Architecture is Hope”: A Conversation with Li Hu of OPEN Architecture

07:00 - 11 March, 2019
© Zhang Chao. ImageTsinghua Ocean Center / OPEN Architecture
© Zhang Chao. ImageTsinghua Ocean Center / OPEN Architecture

Meeting with many leading, independent Chinese architects and visiting their built works throughout China in recent years has shaped my understanding of their contributions as regionally sensitive, poetic, photogenic, and even seductive. Yet, so many of these projects can be confused as being produced by a single, narrowly-focused practice. These works are often small in scale and built far from urban centers where ordinary people could benefit from them most. There is a lack of diversity and risk-taking. The following excerpt from my interview with Beijing-based architect Li Hu on his recent visit to New York overturned my doubts and gave me much hope for China’s urban future.

12 Award-Winning Women in Architecture From the Past 12 Months

09:00 - 8 March, 2019
12 Award-Winning Women in Architecture From the Past 12 Months, AL_A's MAAT museum in Lisbon. Image © Francisco Nogueira
AL_A's MAAT museum in Lisbon. Image © Francisco Nogueira

In the 12 months since 2018 International Women’s Day, we have seen many female architects come to fore of the design discourse. From Shelley McNamara and Yvonne Farrell’s curation of the 2018 Venice Biennale to Frida Escobedo's celebrated design for the Serpentine Pavilion, the architectural newsfeeds from the past twelve months have played host to many signs of change in a traditionally male-dominated profession.

ArchDaily has also been busy over the past year, publishing stories such as twelve prominent women in architectural photography, seven influential women of the Bauhaus, and the women redefining success in architecture. Beyond news and editorials, the honorary lists and award ceremonies of prominent architectural institutions from around the world have also paid tribute to some of the world’s leading and emerging female architects.

“Our work is to inspire joy”: Natasha Case Talks Coolhaus Ice Cream and Designing for Delight

07:00 - 8 March, 2019
“Our work is to inspire joy”: Natasha Case Talks Coolhaus Ice Cream and Designing for Delight, Courtesy of Coolhaus
Courtesy of Coolhaus

Architecture is defined by people. It’s the human condition that shapes the spaces we live within and the moments we share. Few designers and entrepreneurs understand this better than Natasha Case, co-founder of Coolhaus Ice Cream. Trained as an architect, Natasha began exploring a passion for what she called “Farchitecture” – or, Food + Architecture – in her graduate architecture program. The concept originated with the broader notion that design could enhance everyday life, and, by the same token, that food could bring awareness to design.

In an exclusive interview with ArchDaily, Natasha talks about her inspiration for creating architecturally inspired ice cream, how Los Angeles influences her life and work, and what it means to bring joy into the process of making.

Courtesy of Coolhaus Courtesy of Coolhaus Courtesy of Coolhaus Courtesy of Coolhaus + 14

Arata Isozaki Named 2019 Pritzker Prize Laureate

10:00 - 5 March, 2019
Arata Isozaki Named 2019 Pritzker Prize Laureate, Courtesy of Image: Pritzker. Collage: ArchDaily by Danae Santibáñez
Courtesy of Image: Pritzker. Collage: ArchDaily by Danae Santibáñez

Arata Isozaki has been named the 2019 laureate of the Pritzker Prize for Architecture. Isozaki, who has been practicing architecture since the 1960s, has long been considered an architectural visionary for his transnational and fearlessly futurist approach to design. With well over 100 built works to his name, Isozaki is also incredibly prolific and influential among his contemporaries. Isozaki is the 49th architect and eighth Japanese architect to receive the honor.

Said the jury of Isozaki in the award citation: “...in his search for meaningful architecture, he created buildings of great quality that to this day defy categorizations, reflect his constant evolution, and are always fresh in their approach.”

© Hisao Suzuki © Hisao Suzuki © Yasuhiro Ishimoto © Hisao Suzuki + 11

“Form-Generating is Similar to Music – You Try to Compose Music and Suddenly the Melody Comes”: In Conversation with Kevin Roche

07:00 - 4 March, 2019
“Form-Generating is Similar to Music – You Try to Compose Music and Suddenly the Melody Comes”: In Conversation with Kevin Roche, National Conference Center, Dublin, Ireland, 2010 © Kevin Roche John Dinkeloo and Associates
National Conference Center, Dublin, Ireland, 2010 © Kevin Roche John Dinkeloo and Associates

American architect Kevin Roche passed away this past Friday, March 1 at the age of 96. He was born in 1922 in Dublin, Ireland, educated at the University College Dublin (1945) and Illinois Institute of Technology (1948). In 1966, he formed Kevin Roche John Dinkeloo and Associates (KRJDA). He has designed more than 200 buildings, including renovation to the American Wing at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (2012), National Conference Centre in Dublin (2010), Lafayett Tower in Washington DC (2009), J.P. Morgan Headquarters in Manhattan (1992), Central Park Zoo in Manhattan (1988), The Knights of Columbus Building Headquarters in New Haven (1969), The Ford Foundation in Manhattan (1968), and Oakland Museum of California (1966). In 1982 he became the fourth Pritzker Prize winner and in 1993 was awarded the AIA Gold Medal. The following excerpt is from our 2011 interview at the architect’s office in Hamden, Connecticut.

How Zena Howard Uses Design to Help Cities Heal

07:00 - 1 March, 2019
The Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture. Image© Brad Feinknopf
The Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture. Image© Brad Feinknopf

This article was originally published on Metropolis Magazine as "Game Changers: Architect Zena Howard is Using Design as Urban Healing." Metropolis' annual Game Changers series highlights those in design who are pushing the field forward.

Transforming urban centers can be slow going when the process is rooted in community engagement. But within the next five to ten years, historically African-American neighborhoods in Charlotte and Greenville, North Carolina; Miami; Vancouver; and Los Angeles will experience major change, thanks to architect Zena Howard, who leads Perkins+Will’s cultural practice in North Carolina.

The Virtues and Limits of Photography in the Representation of Architecture: Five Photographers Share their Perspectives

07:30 - 28 February, 2019
The Virtues and Limits of Photography in the Representation of Architecture: Five Photographers Share their Perspectives, Viviendas San Ignacio / IX2 Arquitectura. Jalisco, México. Image © Lorena Darquea
Viviendas San Ignacio / IX2 Arquitectura. Jalisco, México. Image © Lorena Darquea

As a way of representing architecture, photography has certain undisputed qualities. With it, it is possible to present to a project from a distant corner of the globe to people anywhere in the world, showing everything from general views to internal spaces and constructive details - extending the reach and, in a way, the access to the architecture.

But like any other form of representation, it is not infallible. Even as technological advances allow for ever more well-defined images and editing software offer tools to retouch and even alter aspects of the built space, photography by its very nature lacks the means to convey sensory and tactile aspects of architecture. It is not possible - at least not satisfactorily - to experience the textures, sounds, feelings, and scents of spaces through static images.

Faculdade de Biologia Celular e Genética / Héctor Fernández Elorza. Madri, Espanha. Image © Montse Zamorano Sesc Pompeia / Lina Bo Bardi. São Paulo, Brasil.. Image © Manuel Sá The Sales Center in Wenzhou TOD New Town / NAN Architects. Wenzhou, China. Image © FangFang Tian Tate Modern Switch House / Herzog & de Meuron. Londres, Reino Unido. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 15

6 Thoughts On Materials and Construction: Decisions That Improve People's Quality Of Life

07:00 - 28 February, 2019
6 Thoughts On Materials and Construction: Decisions That Improve People's Quality Of Life, © José Tomás Franco
© José Tomás Franco

Materials, products, and construction systems are constantly evolving and following new technologies, discoveries, and market trends. The question is: are we, as architects, evolving with them? We have heard about robots working on construction sites, responsive and intelligent materials and the continued rise of 3D printing, but is it all white noise at the moment of starting a new design? More importantly, could these new systems continue to progress without sensitively and effectively taking people's quality of life into account?

How should we use materials—both in their traditional forms and in their future conceptions—so that our projects are making relevant contributions to the way we are inhabiting our planet?

In order to evolve, we have to know how, so it’ s worth beginning a discussion around these issues.

“I Don’t Have Any Competitors Because My Projects Are Unique”: In Conversation with Hua Zhang

07:00 - 27 February, 2019
“I Don’t Have Any Competitors Because My Projects Are Unique”: In Conversation with Hua Zhang, Yu Qingcheng Gallery, Tianjin, China. ImageCourtesy of Architectural Design and Research Institute of Tianjin University
Yu Qingcheng Gallery, Tianjin, China. ImageCourtesy of Architectural Design and Research Institute of Tianjin University

The following excerpt from my recent interview with Tianjin-based architect Zhang Hua continues an ongoing series of interviews that I’ve been conducting during my frequent trips to China. Zhang Hua is leading his design studio, Zhanghua Architects, which is a part of Tianjin University Research Institute. Professor Zhang Hua’s work follows his uncompromising form-generating theory, which is based on the desire to capture the progression of transformational processes. In his many built projects, the architect examines and expresses such formal transformations as turning from something basic to complex or from monolith to disperse. The focus is on the state of transformation itself, how a form is changing and morphing from one state to another. We spoke with Zhang Hua through an interpreter at the institute, with half a dozen young architects and researchers from his studio, seated all around and taking notes.

Yu Qingcheng Gallery, Tianjin, China. ImageCourtesy of Architectural Design and Research Institute of Tianjin University Geological Museum Tianjin, China / Zhang Hua. ImageCourtesy of Architectural Design and Research Institute of Tianjin University Geological Museum Tianjin, China / Zhang Hua. ImageCourtesy of Architectural Design and Research Institute of Tianjin University Millet Vinegar Museum / Zhang Hua. ImageCourtesy of Zhang Hua + 24

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