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Foster+Partners-Led Trailblazer Apprenticeships Bring Overdue Relief for Disenfranchised Architecture Students

06:30 - 19 July, 2018
Foster+Partners-Led Trailblazer Apprenticeships Bring Overdue Relief for Disenfranchised Architecture Students, Foster + Partners' London office, Riverside. Image © Marc Goodwin
Foster + Partners' London office, Riverside. Image © Marc Goodwin

Earlier this month, a “Trailblazer Group” comprising 20 leading architecture firms led by Foster + Partners announced the creation of the UK’s first Architecture Apprenticeship Standards. Supported by the RIBA, ARB (Architects Registration Board) and over a dozen UK universities, the group has structured a program which tackles the financial feasibility of an architectural education through paid apprenticeships, and addresses the disparity experienced by students transitioning between education and practice

While doing little to alter the notorious seven-year length of the UK's accreditation process, the apprenticeship is a welcome and proactive step in reforming an education system which, on the ground, breeds an atmosphere of financial insecurity, mental health issues, and a disenchantment among students with the value of their £45,000 investment in architecture degrees.

Foster + Partners' London office, Riverside. Image © Marc Goodwin Foster + Partners will lead the Trailblazers Apprenticeships program. Image via Norman Foster Foundation Hawkins/Brown, who designed the new campus for UCL's Bartlett School, will take part in the program. Courtesy of The Bartlett School of Architecture <a href='https://www.archdaily.com/489721/lines-drawn-the-uk-architecture-students-network-discuss-the-future-of-architectural-education'>In 2014, the UK Architecture Student Network met to discuss the future of architectural education</a> Image © Vinesh Pomal / Zlatina Spasova + 6

Forget "Post-Digital": Why Technological Innovation in Architecture is Only Just Getting Started

09:30 - 18 July, 2018
Forget "Post-Digital": Why Technological Innovation in Architecture is Only Just Getting Started, Cloud Pergola, the Croatian National Pavilion at this year’s Venice Architecture Biennale, is one of the largest robotically extruded 3D-printed structures ever built. The robotic arm was trained to adapt to the unpredictable material behavior, by gleaning real-time feedback from the construction process. The installation was designed by Alisa Andrasek (with Bruno Juricic and Madalin Gheorghe), engineered by Arup London, and fabricated by Ai Build. Image © Luke Hayes
Cloud Pergola, the Croatian National Pavilion at this year’s Venice Architecture Biennale, is one of the largest robotically extruded 3D-printed structures ever built. The robotic arm was trained to adapt to the unpredictable material behavior, by gleaning real-time feedback from the construction process. The installation was designed by Alisa Andrasek (with Bruno Juricic and Madalin Gheorghe), engineered by Arup London, and fabricated by Ai Build. Image © Luke Hayes

This article was originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "The Post-Digital Will Be Even More Digital, Says Mario Carpo."

Book presentations, or book launches, are holdovers from ages long past. One could argue that the same applies to books in print themselves; but we still read and write books, never mind in which shape and form, while I do not see many reasons to keep presenting them in brick-and-mortar bookshops, or similar venues. Friends in the publishing industry tell me that a single tweet, or a successful hashtag on Instagram, can sell more copies than a book launch—and at a lesser cost, for sure. Besides, one of the most baffling aspects of book launches is that, traditionally—and I remember this was already the case when I was a student—a significant fraction of the public in attendance tends to be viscerally and vocally hostile to the topic of the book being presented. Why would readers who dislike a book as a plain matter of principle take the time to read it in full then vent their anger at its author, I cannot tell; but this is to say that having published a book last fall titled The Second Digital Turn: Design Beyond Intelligence, I had plenty of opportunities, in the course of the last few months, to glean a vast repertoire of technophobic commonplaces. Chiefly noted among them, due to its sheer outlandishness, was the objection that digital innovation would by now have fully run its course: having adapted to, and adopted, some new tools and technologies, architects would have moved on, free at last to get back to things that really matter to them (whatever they might be).

How Long Does it Take to Become an Architect?

07:00 - 17 July, 2018
How Long Does it Take to Become an Architect?, Courtesy of Andrea Vasquez
Courtesy of Andrea Vasquez

Before deciding on a career in architecture, plenty of questions can cross one’s mind: Which school should I choose? Should I study abroad or choose a local school? Would enrolling in top international universities cost me a fortune? How long will it take for me to finally be able to build my own structure? At the end of the day, the making of an architect is pretty simple: half a decade of architecture studies, and then some.

Whether you are considering studying abroad or staying home, you'll need to know how long it takes to become an architect in your country of choice. Take a look at how long it usually takes to earn that degree in different countries from all over the world, and what you'll need to do (aside from attending school) before becoming a certified architect.

45 Construction Terms & Concepts All Architects Should Know

09:30 - 16 July, 2018
45 Construction Terms & Concepts All Architects Should Know, Dune Art Museum. Image Courtesy of Open Architecture
Dune Art Museum. Image Courtesy of Open Architecture

For most recent graduates, it quickly becomes evident that what you learn in architecture school is not necessarily enough to become a confident architect. Some things can’t be taught in classrooms at all; instead, they're acquired through years of work on site and solving construction problems first-hand. Among the many things you learn on site are the terminologies used by construction workers that can sound like absolute nonsense to architects at first.

An architecture dictionary might seem like a superb idea, but in practice wouldn't be convenient on a construction site—unless you can memorize the useful entries out of the 25,000 terms in Cyril M Harris' Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Alternatively, here’s a more manageable list of 45 construction terms and concepts every architect should know.

Cross Bracing. Image <a href='https://pxhere.com/en/photo/970928'>via pxhere</a> (public domain)  Precast Concrete blocks used in Frank Lloyd Wright's Tonkens House. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Example_of_precast_concrete_blocks_in_the_Tonkens_House._Photo_courtesy_of_Toby_Oliver..jpg'>Wikimedia user Factfile8</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 4.0</a> Virtual Design & Construction. Image <a href='https://pxhere.com/en/photo/547880'>via pxhere</a> (public domain) Diagrid. Image <a href='https://unsplash.com/photos/VIrwcwdr2Bc'>via Unsplash</a> (public domain) + 11

How the Masters See It: Six Ways to Design with Light

09:30 - 15 July, 2018
How the Masters See It: Six Ways to Design with Light, Sculpted Light: Upper level gallery of the Jumex Museum by David Chipperfield (David Chipperfield Architects). Large skylight monitors with diffusing filters provide even illumination in the top-floor gallery and control the abundant sunlight and solar-heat gains. Image © Simon Menges
Sculpted Light: Upper level gallery of the Jumex Museum by David Chipperfield (David Chipperfield Architects). Large skylight monitors with diffusing filters provide even illumination in the top-floor gallery and control the abundant sunlight and solar-heat gains. Image © Simon Menges

Light is an important, if complex, tool in architecture. Not only does it lend atmosphere, texture, and vibrancy, but it is increasingly essential in an age where technology alienates us from nature. In this excerpt from Mary Guzowski's new book, The Art of Architectural Daylighting, she introduces the science and art of daylighting - and details six ways the masters approach the challenge.  

ArchDaily at The Midnight Charette Podcast

09:30 - 14 July, 2018
ArchDaily at The Midnight Charette Podcast, Courtesy of The Midnight Charette
Courtesy of The Midnight Charette

In the ten years since our site was launched, ArchDaily has grown into the world’s most visited architecture website; it is now a project with greater reach and scale than the site’s founders could ever have anticipated. Thanks to our readers, contributors and leadership, the initial iteration of the site (based in Chile and known as Plataforma Arquitectura) has evolved into a global architecture media network that includes the English site you’re reading right now as well as region and language-specific sister sites in Brazil, China, Colombia, Mexico, and Peru.

The story of ArchDaily's growth is one of the many topics covered in a new 114-minute interview with ArchDaily’s co-founder David Basulto on this week’s episode of the Midnight Charette podcast. Hosted by David Lee and Marina Bourderonnet, the podcast features weekly discussions on design issues of the day and interviews with figures in the architecture community. In their talk with Basulto, the conversation wanders from the story of our company and some behind-the-scenes trivia about how our site works (did you know our custom content management system is named after the biblical Tower of Babel’s designer?) to insights on how architects will shape our future cities and the ways that data collection and analysis could shape the designs of tomorrow.

How Luis Barragán Used Light to Make Us See Color

09:30 - 12 July, 2018
How Luis Barragán Used Light to Make Us See Color, © 2018 Barragan Foundation, Switzerland/SOMAAP; Fred Sandback Archive
© 2018 Barragan Foundation, Switzerland/SOMAAP; Fred Sandback Archive

In Luis Barragán’s poetic imagination color plays as significant a role as dimension or space. Rough textures and water reflections heighten the impact of bright sunlight in his colorful buildings. But where does such vibrancy come from and how is it heightened by the architecture itself?

© 2018 Barragan Foundation, Switzerland/SOMAAP; Fred Sandback Archive © 2018 Barragan Foundation, Switzerland/SOMAAP; Fred Sandback Archive © 2018 Barragan Foundation, Switzerland/SOMAAP; Fred Sandback Archive © 2018 Barragan Foundation, Switzerland/SOMAAP; Fred Sandback Archive + 6

The Architecture Behind a Brave Racoon's Viral Skyscraper Climb

09:30 - 11 July, 2018
The Architecture Behind a Brave Racoon's Viral Skyscraper Climb, © Evan Frost/<a href='https://www.mprnews.org/'>MPR News</a>
© Evan Frost/MPR News

This article was originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "SOM Explains Exactly How a Raccoon Scaled Its St. Paul Skyscraper."

After completing Town Square, a mixed-use, double-tower complex in the heart of St. Paul, Minnesota in 1980, the late architect Donald Smith of SOM told Architectural Record magazine, “We must reorient our attention to the center [of] cities to save them.”

Smith’s words were prophetic, it turns out, but not in the way he may have expected.

Last month, Town Square—now known as UBS Plaza—captured the attention of the globe as a scraggly, wayward raccoon climbed up its southern tower’s 25 stories.

The rough, exposed aggregate concrete facade allowed the raccoon to scale the building like a tree. Image © Evan Frost/<a href='https://www.mprnews.org/'>MPR News</a> When completed in 1980, SOM's Town Square project in St. Paul (designed by the firm's Denver office) was a prime example of late-'70s mixed use buildings. Image Courtesy of SOM / © Hedrich Blessing The complex, as late architect Donald Smith told Architectural Record at the time, aimed to foster development in urban centers "in terms of people, not the automobile". Image Courtesy of SOM / © Hedrich Blessing Detail of the building's concrete facade system. Image Courtesy of SOM + 7

Why Stadiums Made of Wood Could Be the Next Big Innovation in Sports Architecture

09:30 - 10 July, 2018
Why Stadiums Made of Wood Could Be the Next Big Innovation in Sports Architecture, A rendering of a stadium constructed with Bear Stadiums and Rubner Holzbau’s modular wood systems. Image Courtesy of Rubner Holzbau
A rendering of a stadium constructed with Bear Stadiums and Rubner Holzbau’s modular wood systems. Image Courtesy of Rubner Holzbau

This article was originally published by Autodesk's Redshift publication as "Could Modular Wood Stadium Construction Be a Game Changer?"

Imagine a sports stadium that could expand and contract with its fan base and team’s fortunes, one that could pick up and move to greener (and more lucrative) pastures.

Given team owners’ history of playing fans against each other, making stadiums more mobile isn’t likely to give pennant-wavers a sense of security, but the concept is an incredible breakthrough for building technology. Endlessly modular and made of ultralow-impact mass timber, this vision of low-carbon construction, conceived by engineered-wood manufacturer Rubner Holzbau and prefabricated stadium designer Bear Stadiums, could soon materialize at a soccer pitch near you.

History's Most Notorious Unfinished Buildings

09:30 - 9 July, 2018
© Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Família
© Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Família

Both today and in centuries past, it is a reality of building that not every project is destined for success. Financial issues or unrealistic timetables can complicate a building’s construction but, while usually the final result eventually meets the initial expectations, other times the worst-case scenario of a building being abandoned during construction becomes a nightmare come true. Unfortunately, these failed projects have an extensive history. Economic factors are the most common cause of unfinished construction, but buildings have also been stranded in limbo by wars, geopolitical shifts, epidemics of disease and other unpredictable obstacles, leaving partial structures as haunting reminders of what might have been.

Whether partially completed and left as ruins or still under construction decades (or centuries) after initial groundbreaking, unfinished buildings offer an alternative history of our built environment, promising long-delayed gratification or examples of design so ambitious that they prove impossible to realize. Initiated by civilizations across the globe, the following list details just a few examples of history’s most interesting and infamous unfinished construction projects.

Image by Ilya Ilusenko <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Palace_Of_Soviets_8.JPG'>via Wikimedia</a> (public domain) © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/hisgett/4675714481'>Flickr user hisgett</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> © Raphael Olivier © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Tourists_posing_at_the_National_Monument_of_Scotland.jpg'>Wikimedia user Colin</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/'>CC BY-SA 4.0</a> + 12

What if it's All a Front? Zacharie Gaudrillot-Roy Reimagines Buildings as Isolated Facades

09:30 - 8 July, 2018
© Zacharie Gaudrillot-Roy
© Zacharie Gaudrillot-Roy

In his ongoing photo-series "Façades," French photographer Zacharie Gaudrillot-Roy a series of images in which he removes the mass and depth of buildings, and leaves behind the mere fragments of exterior skin. The photos, which resemble deserted Hollywood sets, illustrate roadways, towns, apartment complexes, and other environments without giving away the ideas of anything beyond the superficial image of the facade—leaving much to the imagination.

© Zacharie Gaudrillot-Roy © Zacharie Gaudrillot-Roy © Zacharie Gaudrillot-Roy © Zacharie Gaudrillot-Roy + 11

How Could Modern Self-Build Communities Challenge the Role of the Architect?

09:30 - 7 July, 2018
How Could Modern Self-Build Communities Challenge the Role of the Architect?, via Graven Hill Village Development Company
via Graven Hill Village Development Company

Self-build”: no mention of an architect, or anyone else for that matter. Maybe it’s a prehistoric urge that makes this idea so enticing; our earliest ancestors constructed their primitive huts to suit their unique needs and reflect their status or style. “Self-build” promises to physically re-connect people to the homes they live in.

However, the romantic notion of "self-build" housing is rarely compatible with the modern reality we live in. Building has become increasingly clouded by the difficulty of procuring land, excessive governmental red-tape, and an increase in building complexity. While self-build remains the purest form of this dream, there are now a series of nuanced processes that can help us achieve similar results. As a new generation of communities that encourage this dream emerges, we must look at the role the architect plays within them.

via Graven Hill Village Development Company via Graven Hill Village Development Company via Graven Hill Village Development Company via Graven Hill Village Development Company + 9

74 Exceptional Architecture Portfolios

09:30 - 6 July, 2018
74 Exceptional Architecture Portfolios, Natchai 'N' Suwannapruk. Image via Issuu
Natchai 'N' Suwannapruk. Image via Issuu

Technical skills: check. Visually coherent content: check. Distinctive personal input on both the projects and portfolio design: double check.

Although résumés and portfolios can be somewhat flat when it comes to informative content, it is their ability to present an applicant's unique sense of style that makes or breaks an application. Whether it’s a deliberate image selection, or a clear, consistent layout, some people manage to fulfill all the criteria needed in a successful portfolio. Issuu, the world’s largest online digital publishing platform that allows anyone—from architects to global brands to fresh graduates—to publish their creative content online, has hand-picked their top 74 exceptional architecture portfolios. The selected architects have managed to showcase their impressive projects and technical skills in portfolios that reflect their creative mindset.

We’re not saying you should judge a book by its cover, but some "covers" can’t help but stand out from the rest, for all the right reasons. Take a look at Issuu’s list of top architecture portfolios here, and see a few of our personal favorites below.

Populous Creates Design-Build Group to Deliver Sports Venue Upgrades (Without Upsetting Fans)

09:30 - 5 July, 2018
Populous Creates Design-Build Group to Deliver Sports Venue Upgrades (Without Upsetting Fans), Arena das Dunas, Brazil by Populous. Image Courtesy of Populous
Arena das Dunas, Brazil by Populous. Image Courtesy of Populous

As an industry populated by creators, the business of design is continually reconsidered and reshaped by processes of reinvention and experimentation. Rarely content with yesterday’s innovations in anything from modeling software to building materials, architects naturally look for strategic ways to gain maximum advantage in both building and business. Taking just such a creative approach to the challenge of improving athletic venues within the stringent time frame of a team’s offseason, the dominant Kansas City-based sports architecture firm Populous recently launched a standalone service that employs the efficiency advantages of a design-build firm to simplify and expand the process of implementing stadium upgrades without any disruption to the fan experience.

Aviva Stadium, Dublin by Populous. Image © Scott Tallon Walker Arena das Dunas, Brazil by Populous. Image Courtesy of Populous Bristol Arena, England by Populous. Image Courtesy of Bristol City council Fisht Olympic Stadium, Sochi by Populous. Image © 2014 XXII Winter Olympic Games + 9

Open Call: The Best Student Design-Build Projects

04:00 - 5 July, 2018
Open Call: The Best Student Design-Build Projects

When learning about architecture, there is no replacement for practical experience: seeing how materials can be joined together, how structural elements respond to the stresses placed upon them, or how construction techniques can alter the finished project. For this reason, it is a good idea to give students a chance for some hands-on experience building real structures—something that, due to budgetary constraints and the academic culture of many architecture schools, has sadly been uncommon in the past.

However, in recent years, this culture has started to shift, with increasing numbers of architecture schools finding ways for students to be involved in construction projects, from small, temporary interventions and pavilions, to larger permanent buildings. In order to show the excellent work that can be done in an educational context, for the fourth time ArchDaily is calling on students and professors to submit the design-build projects they have completed in the past year. As always, we're teaming up with all of ArchDaily en Español, ArchDaily Brasil, and ArchDaily China, in the hope that we can present the best work from students worldwide to a worldwide audience. Read on to find out how you can take part.

6 Modern Building Types That Will Soon Disappear Forever

09:30 - 4 July, 2018
Corner Shop (2000). Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/8431398@N04/2535026759'>Flickr user Andrea_44</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
Corner Shop (2000). Image © Flickr user Andrea_44 licensed under CC BY 2.0

Architecture is often seen as something which provides a place-marker in history, reflecting the zeitgeist of an era. But how do we design architecture in a world that is changing faster than ever before, where entire types of buildings disappear seemingly in a flash? Here, we round up six types of buildings that came into existence in modern times and are fading as fast as they appeared. Mostly banal and previously ubiquitous, the nostalgia associated with the disappearance of these buildings taps into something emotional, rather than intellectual admiration.

Memory and architecture are closely linked, with Juhani Pallasmaa in his book The Eyes of the Skin describing how “the body knows and remembers. Architectural meaning derives from archaic responses and reactions remembered by the body and the senses.” Some of the structures below have become obsolete within half a lifespan—an interesting point to consider in a discipline that has historically valued permanence above all. If structures no longer serve a social function, will they be remembered?

Milk Bar, West Footscray, Australia. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/spin_spin/97439414'>Flickr user Susan Fitzgerald</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-ND 2.0</a> UK Phone Booth . Image via Pixabay Closing down sale at Blockbuster Video, Bank Street, Galashiels. Image © <a href='https://www.geograph.org.uk/profile/6638'>Walter Baxter</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> Photobooth photos. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/simpleinsomnia/11980473896/in/album-72157637046542045/'>Flickr user simpleinsomnia </a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> + 11

7 Notable Unbuilt Structures Brought to Life in New Renders

09:30 - 3 July, 2018
7 Notable Unbuilt Structures Brought to Life in New Renders, Courtesy of Onward by Onstride Financial
Courtesy of Onward by Onstride Financial

It only takes a pen, paper, and an innovative mind to create remarkable structures. Bringing these architectures to life, however, is where challenges arise. While some architects have shown their creativity and ambition by designing and constructing some of the craziest structures the world has ever seen, other architects were only left with an ambitious drawing. Whether due to financial limitations or designs that are way ahead of their time, some projects never saw the light of day.

Although you won’t be visiting these structures anytime soon—or ever, as far as we know—take a virtual tour of what could have been 7 of the world’s most iconic, innovative structures, courtesy of renders produced by Onward, the blog from Onstride Financial.

How Important is the Name of a Renowned Architect to a Project?

09:30 - 2 July, 2018
How Important is the Name of a Renowned Architect to a Project?, Port offices of Antwerp, Zaha Hadid Architects, 2016. Image © Helene Binet
Port offices of Antwerp, Zaha Hadid Architects, 2016. Image © Helene Binet

From the Fundación Arquia Blog, architect José Ramón Hernandez brings us an article that reflects on projects that can only be appreciated because of who they were created by. If it weren't for the fact that they bear the signature of their illustrious creator, they most likely would have gone completely unnoticed or even despised.