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Niall Patrick Walsh

Hailing from Ireland, Niall is the News Editor at ArchDaily having joined in 2017 as an editorial intern. He is currently based in Dublin, where we works as a graduate architect for BDP, one of the largest firms in the UK and Ireland. niallpatrickwalsh@archdaily.com

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Ode to Pioneers - A Vision For The 'House of Delft' Mixed-Use Hub

Van Dongen–Kuschuch Architects and Planners has released images for its ‘House of Delft’ mixed-use hub in the Netherlands. Located beside Delft Central Train Station, the scheme will act as a gateway to both the historic city center and the renowned University of Technology. The architectural intent behind the proposal is to celebrate the artistic, scientific and innovative achievements which came from the city throughout its history. As visitors step off the train, it will be both an introduction to the city, and an indicator of what it has to offer.

The facades are to act as display windows to future innovation in Delft. Image Courtesy of Van Dongen-Koschuch Architects and Planners The House of Delft acts as an introduction to the city. Image Courtesy of Van Dongen-Koschuch Architects and Planners House of Delft will be constructed of high-quality durable materials. Image Courtesy of Van Dongen-Koschuch Architects and Planners House of Delft will offer a range of rented and market studios. Image Courtesy of Van Dongen-Koschuch Architects and Planners + 8

Humanity and Art Entwined - How NADAAA's Exhibit Became Blankets for Syrian Refugees

Jordanian artist Raya Kassisieh, with the support of American firm NADAAA, has repurposed her exhibit from the Amman Design Week in Jordan to create blankets for Syrian refugees and Jordanian families. The Entrelac exhibit, created by Kassisieh and NADAAA, consists of 300kg of hand-knit, un-dyed wool which was later cut and stitched to create blankets for those fleeing the Syrian Civil War, now approaching its sixth year.

The exhibit was displayed at the Amman Design Festival in September 2016. Image © Roland Halbe The exhibit was stitched into blankets to aid Syrian refugees. Image Courtesy of Amman Design Week The exhibit was stitched into blankets to aid Syrian refugees. Image Courtesy of Amman Design Week The exhibit is made of hand-knit, un-dyed wool. Image Courtesy of Amman Design Week + 11

A Roof for Verona’s Roman Amphitheater – Competition Winners Announced

The results of a competition to propose an openable roof over the Arena di Verona, Italy have been announced. Three winners were chosen out of eighty-seven proposals to cover the famous amphitheater, a defining symbol of the city of Verona. The competition was announced in March 2016 in order to protect the Roman monument from the elements and to ensure that it continues to provide quality entertainment to spectators two thousand years after its construction.

Winning proposal by GMP. Image Courtesy of City of Verona Press Office Winning proposal by GMP. Image Courtesy of City of Verona Press Office Second place proposal by Vincenzo Latina. Image Courtesy of City of Verona Press Office Third place proposal by Roberto Ventura. Image Courtesy of City of Verona Press Office + 19

Architecture Initiative Transforms Derelict Brutalist Northampton Landmark into Mixed-Use Academy

London-based firm Architecture Initiative has released updates of their mixed-use scheme set to transform a neglected brutalist building in Northampton, England. The Northampton International Academy, currently an abandoned Royal Mail sorting office, will be centered around educational, commercial, and community use. The scheme aims to address a need for school places in a manner which contributes to the economic regeneration of the local area.

Public plaza and facilities. Image Courtesy of Architecture Initiative Voids allow natural light deep into the building. Image Courtesy of Architecture Initiative Existing concrete structure is retained. Image Courtesy of Architecture Initiative Work began on site in September 2016. Image Courtesy of Architecture Initiative + 22

Competition Winning Stadium Design Promotes Inclusivity in Dunkirk, France

The SOCKEEL + OLGGA consortium have won a competition to design the new Tribut Stadium in Dunkirk, France. The historic stadium, in a prominent location on a canal bank in central Dunkirk, will be transformed into a 5,000 seat stadium seeking to maximize inclusiveness and accessibility.

Public plaza and entrance concourse. Image Courtesy of Viktor Fretyán Interior perspective with concourse in background. Image Courtesy of Viktor Fretyán Exploded axonometric . Image Courtesy of Viktor Fretyán Movement through the transparent lattice animates the streetfront. Image Courtesy of Viktor Fretyán + 11

de Architekten Cie. and FELIXX's Competition-Winning Transformation of Chelyabinsk

Dutch firm de Architekten Cie, in collaboration with Felixx Landscape Architects and Planners, has won an international competition to transform the historic Russian city of Chelyabinsk. The winning masterplan, chosen by the City Administration of Chelyabinsk from five proposals, seeks to activate the city’s existing grid structure and to use it as a vehicle for spatial transformation.

Proposed panoramic view. Image Courtesy of Felixx Landscape Architects and Planners The reactivated historic grid. Image Courtesy of Felixx Landscape Architects and Planners Development of the Miass river. Image Courtesy of Felixx Landscape Architects and Planners The reactivated historic grid. Image Courtesy of Felixx Landscape Architects and Planners + 8

Henley Halebrown Releases New Images of Mixed Use School in London

Henley Halebrown has released updates for their proposed mixed-use scheme in Hackney, London. 333 Kingland Road, previously occupied by a fire station, will soon be home to the Hackney New Primary School, commercial units, and dual aspect apartments. The scheme aims to address a need for school places and homes in London and to maintain a connection between learning and living in a dense urban environment.

The central school courtyard. Image Courtesy of Henley Halebrown Model of school entrance. Image Courtesy of Henley Halebrown Looking east along Downham Road. Image Courtesy of Henley Halebrown Looking south along Kingsland Road. Image Courtesy of Henley Halebrown + 15

How Rebuilding Britain’s Houses of Parliament Helped Create Clean Air Laws

MIT has published new research revealing how the reconstruction of the British Houses of Parliament paved the way for legislation to tackle air pollution in Victorian London. Through original archival work into the 1840-1870 reconstruction, MIT architectural historian Timothy Hyde has revealed that work on the Parliament building was so hindered by air pollution that the British government ordered an inquiry into the effects of the atmosphere on new buildings.

The British Houses of Parliament. Image © Flickr user megantrace. Licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0  © Flickr user daveograve. Licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0. Image New limestone corroded while the building was still being constructed. Image © Flickr user pahudson. Licensed under CC BY 2.0 Westminster Bridge, 1903. Image © Flickr user nedgusnod2. Licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0 + 5

AGi Wins Competition to Transform Galician Roman Ruins into Sensory Museum

AGi Architects has won a competition to transform 18 ancient Roman sites into a natural museum in Pontevedra, Galicia, Spain. The winning proposal, entitled In Natura Veritas, was selected from 26 submissions in a competition organized by the Spanish Ministry of Public Works. The AGi scheme, due to be realized in the coming months, aims to preserve the memory of the natural environment chosen as a living place by the Roman settlers hundreds of years ago and to treat the visitor to a multi-sensory journey through the 18 sites across the Pontevedra landscape.

Courtesy of AGi Architects Courtesy of AGi Architects Light, sounds, scents and textures change throughout the journey. Image Courtesy of AGi Architects An archaeological grid structures the landscape. Image Courtesy of AGi Architects + 12

Want to Understand the Inner Workings of China's iPhone City? Start Here

The New York Times has published an in-depth article entitled ‘How China Built iPhone City With Billions in Perks for Apple’s Partners’, revealing a treasure chest of public benefits for the world’s biggest iPhone factory in Zhengzhou, China. In a city of six million inhabitants in an impoverished region of China, the local government has contributed $1.5 billion to Foxconn, Apple’s supplier of iPhones. The money is used, in part, to improve local infrastructure, reduce Foxconn's export costs, and build housing for the factory’s 350,000-strong workforce (five times the number of people employed directly by Apple in the United States).

Apple Store in Shanghai, China © Flickr user wza. Licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 Zhengzhou Convention Centre © Flickr user josechugijon. Licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 Foxconn manufactures the iPhone © Flickr user prachatai. Licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 iPhone City, Zhengzhou at night © Flickr user damien_thorne. Licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 + 5

FAAB Architektura Fights Smog in Cracow with Proposed Music Academy

FAAB Architektura has designed a smog-fighting music academy on the site of a former military base in Cracow, Poland. In a city constantly tackling air pollution, FAAB has incorporated a 1300 square meter "Air Purifier" into their proposal, combating CO2 levels as effectively as 33,000 city trees. This system, however, is only one element in a music academy wholly integrated with its natural surroundings.

Courtesy of FAAB Architektura Courtesy of FAAB Architektura Courtesy of FAAB Architektura Courtesy of FAAB Architektura + 18

Vincent Callebaut Architectures' Plans for Eco-Neighbourhood in Brussels

Vincent Callebaut Architectures has released plans for the development of a radical eco-neighborhood at Tour & Taxis, Brussels, Belgium. Covering an area of 135,000 square meters, the proposal will see the redevelopment of the early twentieth-century Gare Maritime, and the construction of three residential “vertical forests” reaching 100 meters in height. The architect’s ultimate vision is a neighborhood which embraces technological progress, sustainable building principles, and renewal of the built heritage.

Situated northwest of Brussels city center, and constructed in 1907, the industrial park at Tour & Taxis originally operated as a shipping and customs complex. Whilst the lifting of European customs borders has rendered its original function obsolete, the Gare Maritime (Marine Terminal) still embodies the architecture of the industrial era.

Courtesy of Vincent Callebaut Architectures Courtesy of Vincent Callebaut Architectures Courtesy of Vincent Callebaut Architectures Courtesy of Vincent Callebaut Architectures + 28