ArchDaily | Broadcasting Architecture Worldwidethe world's most visited architecture website
i

Sign up now and start saving and organizing your favorite architecture projects and photos

i

Find the most inspiring products for your projects in our Product Catalog.

i

Get the ArchDaily Chrome Extension and be inspired with every new tab. Install here »

h

Nominate now the Building of the Year 2017 »

All
Projects
Products
Events
Competitions

Gothic Construction Techniques Inspire ETH Zurich's Lightweight Concrete Floor Slabs

08:00 - 19 April, 2017
Gothic Construction Techniques Inspire ETH Zurich's Lightweight Concrete Floor Slabs , © ETH Zurich / Peter Rüegg.
© ETH Zurich / Peter Rüegg.

With the intention of maximizing available space and avoiding steep construction costs, researchers from ETH Zurich’s Department of Architecture have devised a concrete floor slab that with a thickness of a mere 2cm, remains load bearing and simultaneously sustainable. Inspired by the construction of Catalan vaults, this new floor system swaps reinforced steel bars for narrow vertical ribs, thus significantly reducing the weight of construction and ensuring stability to counter uneven distributions on its surface. 

As opposed to traditional concrete floors that are evidently flat, these slabs are designed to arch to support major loads, reminiscent of the vaulted ceilings found in Gothic cathedrals. Without the need for steel reinforcing and with less concrete, the production of CO2 is minimized and the resulting 2cm floors are 70% lighter than their typical concrete counterparts.

via Block Research Group via Block Research Group via Block Research Group via Block Research Group +5

SUTD Professors Bring Parametric Design To Light in Illuminated 3D Printed Installation

16:00 - 15 April, 2017
SUTD Professors Bring Parametric Design To Light in Illuminated 3D Printed Installation, © SUTD: Felix Raspall and Carlos Banon
© SUTD: Felix Raspall and Carlos Banon

A luminous tetrahedral mesh spanning 10 meters, (Ultra) Light Network is the latest 3D printed innovation achieved by Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) Professors Felix Raspall and Carlos Banon, who were also behind this mesh pavilion last year. Displayed at this year’s iLight Marina Bay in Singapore, the interactive light sculpture is an exploration of how full-scale 3D printed components can create a system to “address not only structural requirements but also power transmission, and information communication within a seamless and continuous aesthetic.” 

Suspended over its visitors, the display engages the public through responses to their movements below, controlled by over 50,000 distinct LED pixels and their parent algorithm. This is made possible through five Teensy microcontrollers, working in conjunction with three ultrasonic sensors at the base of the structure, resulting in a lively and illuminating experience. 

© SUTD: Felix Raspall and Carlos Banon © SUTD: Felix Raspall and Carlos Banon © SUTD: Felix Raspall and Carlos Banon © SUTD: Felix Raspall and Carlos Banon +18

This Mysterious 3D Printed Grotto Challenges Boundaries of Computational Geometry and Human Perception

12:00 - 9 April, 2017
This Mysterious 3D Printed Grotto Challenges Boundaries of Computational Geometry and Human Perception, © Michael Lyrenmann
© Michael Lyrenmann

Following the success of their highly intricate Arabesque Wall, Benjamin Dillenburger and Michael Hansmeyer have once again achieved new levels of ornamental eye candy – this time, with a full-scale 3D printed grotto created from seven tons of sandstone. Commissioned by the Centre Pompidou in Paris, the grotto is an example of how the spatial expression of computational technologies can make for remarkable architectural experiences.

“Digital Grotesque II is a testament to and celebration of a new kind of architecture that leaves behind traditional paradigms of rationalization and standardization and instead emphasizes the viewer’s perception, evoking marvel, curiosity and bewilderment,” state Dillenburger and Hansmeyer.

© Michael Hansmeyer © Fabrice Dall’Anese © Michael Hansmeyer © Michael Hansmeyer +21

This 6-Axis Robot Arm Can 3D Print Fiberglass Composites

08:00 - 26 March, 2017
This 6-Axis Robot Arm Can 3D Print Fiberglass Composites, Atropos was developed by architects and engineers at the Politecnico di Milano's +Lab. Image Courtesy of Politecnico di Milano
Atropos was developed by architects and engineers at the Politecnico di Milano's +Lab. Image Courtesy of Politecnico di Milano

A team of architects and engineers at the Politecnico di Milano in Italy have unveiled Atropos, a six-axis robotic arm capable of printing continuous fiber composites. The one of a kind robot was developed by +Lab, the 3D printing laboratory at the Politecnico, who have taken inspiration from fibres found in the natural world. Through a technology known as Continuous Fiber Composites Smart Manufacturing, Atropos has the potential to create large, complex structures to aid the design and construction process.

The design team studied the behaviour of silkworms and spiders when developing the fiber-printing robot. Image Courtesy of Politecnico di Milano Quick-setting fiber resin negates the need for additional supports. Image Courtesy of Politecnico di Milano The six-axis robotic arm uses technology known as Continuous Fiber Composites Smart Manufacturing. Image Courtesy of Politecnico di Milano The process can produce elements ranging from centimeters to meters. Image Courtesy of Politecnico di Milano +16

How a 3D Printer Changed My Life

08:00 - 20 March, 2017
How a 3D Printer Changed My Life, Courtesy of Héctor Llano | Teamstudio
Courtesy of Héctor Llano | Teamstudio

3D printing is here to stay. Every day we see articles that show us the latest accomplishment using 3D printers. From bridges printed entirely in 3D to 3D replicas of lost architecture or for something silly machines that print pizzas. We are fascinated and impressed by everything they can do, but still, regard them as something without real life application. In the field of architecture we see it as the next revolution that will save us the time spent on making models, but ... why limit it to only that?

Umea University Develops Low-Cost, Flexible 3D Printer

08:00 - 17 March, 2017
Umea University Develops Low-Cost, Flexible 3D Printer, © Linnéa Therese Dimitriou
© Linnéa Therese Dimitriou

Sliperiet, Umeå Arts Campus has developed a new type of 3D printer that features increased printing flexibility at a lower cost. Called Hangprinter. The system is suspended by a series of thin fishing lines, it does not require a frame or rails, but rather, it can be attached to any stable surface, for instance, a ceiling. 

As a part of the +Project innovation initiative, the Hangprinter is in the process of making a “Tower of Babel,” a project that currently measures almost three-and-a-half meters tall, making it the tallest object the system has made, as well as “much taller than the scope of any commercially available large format printer.”

Invented by Torbjørn Ludvigsen, who began the project while a student at Umeå University, the Hangprinter’s design was originally formulated to reduce costs. “The frame or box was almost half the cost of the final 3D printer, and I thought I could do without it,” said Ludvigsen. Hangprinter can be put together for about 200 Euros.

© Linnéa Therese Dimitriou © Linnéa Therese Dimitriou © Linnéa Therese Dimitriou © Linnéa Therese Dimitriou +4

Build Your Own 3D Printed House, All in One Day

08:00 - 13 March, 2017
Build Your Own 3D Printed House, All in One Day, Courtesy of Apis Cor
Courtesy of Apis Cor

In recent times, 3D printing technology has made some great strides in its production content and quality, and now it has successfully printed the world’s first liveable house in Stupino, Russia. Responsible for this feat are San Francisco 3D printing startup Apis Cor, and Russian real estate developer PIK, who began the project in December of last year.

“Now we can say with confidence that with Apis Cor solution, the construction 3D printing has leaped to a new evolutionary stage,” said the project team. “The company and its partners are confident that the house in Stupino was the first step that can convince the world that 3D technology in the construction market is a reality.”

Courtesy of Apis Cor Courtesy of Apis Cor Courtesy of Apis Cor Courtesy of Apis Cor +8

This Complex Concrete Column Was Made Using 3D-Printed Formwork

08:00 - 28 February, 2017
This Complex Concrete Column Was Made Using 3D-Printed Formwork, © Lisa Ricciotti
© Lisa Ricciotti

While large-scale 3D printing for architecture continues to be a busy area of research, France-based company XtreeE has been using 3D printed concrete in projects since 2015. Their latest creation is an organic truss-style support structure for a preschool playground in Aix-en-Provence.

Courtesy of XtreeE Courtesy of XtreeE Courtesy of XtreeE Courtesy of XtreeE +11

This 3D-Printer Uses Holograms for Super-Fast Printing

16:15 - 20 February, 2017

One established 3D-printing technique is using laser to cure light-activated plastic, building up layers one at a time in a time-consuming process. But now tech start-up Daqri has discovered a way of speeding up that process: by using a 3-dimensional hologram.

World's First 3D Printed Bridge Opens in Spain

06:00 - 7 February, 2017
World's First 3D Printed Bridge Opens in Spain, Courtesy of IAAC
Courtesy of IAAC

The first 3D printed pedestrian bridge in the world opened to the public on December 14 in Madrid. Led by the Institute of Advanced Architecture of Catalonia (IAAC) in a process that took a year and a half from its conception, the structure crosses a stream in Castilla-La Mancha Park in Alcobendas, Madrid.

Although similar initiatives have already been announced in the Netherlands, this is the first to have finished construction. The structure is printed in micro-reinforced concrete, and measures 12 meters in length and 1.75 meters wide.

Courtesy of IAAC Courtesy of IAAC Courtesy of IAAC Courtesy of IAAC +5

Margot Krasojević Architects Unveils Lace-Like 3D Printed Light Made of Recycled Plastic

14:00 - 8 January, 2017
Margot Krasojević Architects Unveils Lace-Like 3D Printed Light Made of Recycled Plastic, © Margot Krasojević
© Margot Krasojević

In somewhat of a departure from its usual parametric, experimental work, Margot Krasojević Architects has created a recycled, 3D printed LED light, in an investigation of the importance of reappropriating plastics. The project—Lace LED—however, aligns with the firm’s exploration of renewable energy and environmental issues within architecture and product design. 

Printed with post-consumer plastics like synthetic polymer packaging from takeout food containers and 3D printer off-cuts, Lace LED is a light diffuser with fractal pattern configurations resembling a piece of woven lace.

© Margot Krasojević © Margot Krasojević © Margot Krasojević © Margot Krasojević +12

MIT Develops Multi-Material Design System Slated to Become “Photoshop of 3D Printing”

14:00 - 7 January, 2017

Following last year’s introduction of MultiFab, a multi-material 3D printer, researchers at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory has pioneered a system for designing multi-material objects. The new interface, Foundry, is meant to be accessible to non-programmers, whereas multi-material 3D printing technology has historically been prohibitive both with respect to cost and user-friendliness.

Death Masks From MIT Capture Your Dying Breath

16:00 - 4 December, 2016
Death Masks From MIT Capture Your Dying Breath, Courtesy of MIT Media Lab
Courtesy of MIT Media Lab

In the ancient world, traditional death masks were believed to strengthen and protect the soul of the dead as they progressed to the afterlife. It was this mythical notion of transition from death to new life that inspired Vespers, a collection of death masks from Neri Oxman and her team at MIT’s Mediated Matter Group

Courtesy of MIT Media Lab Courtesy of MIT Media Lab Courtesy of MIT Media Lab Courtesy of MIT Media Lab +40

This Kickstarter Campaign is 3D Printing Tokyo in 100 Pieces

09:30 - 8 October, 2016

Have you ever wanted to look over an entire city from the comfort of your own desk? Do you have a sentimental relationship with the city of Tokyo? If you answered "yes" to these questions, iJet Inc, a 3D print solutions company, along with DMM.com Ltd, have launched a Kickstarter that might be for you.

One Hundred Tokyo is a project aiming to reproduce Tokyo’s urban landscape in the form of one hundred ten by ten centimeter 3D printed models. All of the data and equipment needed to gather visual information of the city has been provided by ZENRIN Co Ltd, who traveled around the landscape in specialized vehicles. The 3D models created by this process are then printed on 3DSystems printers, using gypsum powder that is coated in a special resin in order to harden, and then coated once again in resin paint to achieve the full-color skyline.

Courtesy of iJet Inc. Courtesy of iJet Inc. Courtesy of iJet Inc. Courtesy of iJet Inc. +4

Se Yoon Park Uses Architectural Techniques to Symbolize Life in Sculptures

12:00 - 25 September, 2016

After working for OMA, BIG, FR-EE and REXarchitect-turned-artist Se Yoon Park has dedicated the last three years to Light, Darkness, and the Tree, a sculpture series employing digital fabrication techniques to express an allegory for life. With assistants, Vladislav Markov, Kelly Koh, David Temann Lu, Ramon Rivera, Kara Moats, and Insil Jang, Park uses dynamic light and shadow to capture movement on surfaces that contort, split and disappear into each other. 

3D Printed Replica of Syrian Arch Destroyed by ISIS Erected in New York City

12:30 - 21 September, 2016

A photo posted by Wappato (@wappato) on

A year after the ancient city of Palmyra, Syria was destroyed by the Islamic State, a 3D-printed recreation of one of its most iconic structures has begun its world tour. Originally erected in London’s Trafalgar square in April, on Monday, the replica of Palmyra’s Arch of Triumph was unveiled in its new location outside city hall in New York City.

Dinara Kasko's Design Background Inspires Architectural Desserts & Delicacies

10:30 - 12 September, 2016

Part of the beauty of an architectural education is that it provides you with design skills that can be applied to a wide variety to jobs. So when it came time for Kharkov University Architecture School graduate Dinara Kasko to select a career path, she chose to pursue something a little bit sweeter: architectural pastry chef.

via Dinara Kasko's Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/dinarakasko/) via Dinara Kasko's Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/dinarakasko/) via Dinara Kasko's Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/dinarakasko/) via Dinara Kasko's Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/dinarakasko/) +30

AA School of Architecture Designs Adaptable Structural Plastic 3D Printing Method

06:00 - 15 August, 2016
AA School of Architecture Designs Adaptable Structural Plastic 3D Printing Method, Courtesy of The AA School of Architecture
Courtesy of The AA School of Architecture

The AA School of Architecture’s DRL Masters Program has developed a thesis project, entitled Growing Systems, which explores adaptable building systems using methods of robotic fabrication and generative special printing within the context of housing.

Centered on a new method of structural 3D vertical extrusion, the project combines the precision of prefabricated elements with the adaptability of on-site fabrication, in response to the flux and dynamism of cities. The method becomes a system of elasticity that can accommodate site parameters, as well as future adjustments.

Courtesy of The AA School of Architecture Courtesy of The AA School of Architecture Courtesy of The AA School of Architecture Courtesy of The AA School of Architecture +8