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New Book Calls for an End to Our Fetish for Conditioned Skyscrapers

06:00 - 16 March, 2017
New Book Calls for an End to Our Fetish for Conditioned Skyscrapers, Cambridge research seeks to end the architectural fetish of glass and steel skyscrapers © Flickr user tomhilton. Licensed under CC BY 2.0
Cambridge research seeks to end the architectural fetish of glass and steel skyscrapers © Flickr user tomhilton. Licensed under CC BY 2.0

Professor Alan Short of the University of Cambridge has published a book advocating for the revival of 19th-century architectural ideas to address the crippling energy use of modern skyscrapers. The Recovery of Natural Environments in Architecture proposes an end to the architectural fetish for glass, steel, and air conditioning, instead drawing inspiration from forgotten techniques in naturally ventilated buildings of the 1800s. The book is a culmination of 30 years’ research and design by Prof. Short and his colleagues at the University of Cambridge.

Cambridge research seeks to end the architectural fetish of glass and steel skyscrapers © Flickr user tomhilton. Licensed under CC BY 2.0 Professor Short argues that skyscraper design must depart from its current reliance on glass and steel, and begin to harness natural ventilation. Boeri Studio's Bosco Verticale. Image Courtesy of Paolo Rosselli Professor Alan Short calls for an overhaul of artificial ventilation in skyscrapers. Image Courtesy of University of Cambridge Energy demands from a recent skyscraper boom in China has led to energy controls on millions of inhabitants © Flickr user obscurepixels. Licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0 +5

Manufacturing Utopia - How Assemble is Creating a Model Factory at A/D/O

06:00 - 3 March, 2017
Manufacturing Utopia - How Assemble is Creating a Model Factory at A/D/O, The installation is set at A/D/O's courtyard in Brooklyn. Image Courtesy of Sam Nixon
The installation is set at A/D/O's courtyard in Brooklyn. Image Courtesy of Sam Nixon

London-based architecture collective Assemble is set to transform an outdoor courtyard at A/D/O in Brooklyn into a ‘model factory’ to explore utopian ideals of work. The Turner Prize-winning architects will use their first site-specific installation in the U.S. entitled ‘A Factory As It Might Be’ to depict a vision of how society should build and function using abundant, malleable materials.

The factory workshop contains a clay extruder and electric kiln. Image Courtesy of Sam Nixon Shelving will be added to allow for object display. Image Courtesy of Sam Nixon A range of objects can be produced from the factory to enhance the A/D/O courtyard. Image Courtesy of Sam Nixon Assemble have instructed the A/D/O team in tile production. Image Courtesy of Sam Nixon +15

Competition Winning Stadium Design Promotes Inclusivity in Dunkirk, France

12:00 - 4 February, 2017
Competition Winning Stadium Design Promotes Inclusivity in Dunkirk, France, The stadium is located in the heart of Dunkirk. Image Courtesy of Viktor Fretyán
The stadium is located in the heart of Dunkirk. Image Courtesy of Viktor Fretyán

The SOCKEEL + OLGGA consortium have won a competition to design the new Tribut Stadium in Dunkirk, France. The historic stadium, in a prominent location on a canal bank in central Dunkirk, will be transformed into a 5,000 seat stadium seeking to maximize inclusiveness and accessibility.

Public plaza and entrance concourse. Image Courtesy of Viktor Fretyán Interior perspective with concourse in background. Image Courtesy of Viktor Fretyán Exploded axonometric . Image Courtesy of Viktor Fretyán Movement through the transparent lattice animates the streetfront. Image Courtesy of Viktor Fretyán +11

16 Materials Every Architect Needs to Know (And Where to Learn About Them)

16:00 - 14 January, 2017
16 Materials Every Architect Needs to Know (And Where to Learn About Them)

A building’s materiality is what our bodies make direct contact with; the cold metal handle, the warm wooden wall, and the hard glass window would all create an entirely different atmosphere if they were, say, a hard glass handle, a cold metal wall and a warm wooden window (which with KTH’s new translucent wood, is not as absurd as it might sound). Materiality is of just as much importance as form, function and location—or rather, inseparable from all three.

Here we’ve compiled a selection of 16 materials that should be part of the design vocabulary of all architects, ranging from the very familiar (such as concrete and steel) to materials which may be unknown for some of our readers, as well as links to comprehensive resources to learn more about many of them.

AA Summer DLAB Program Applies Computational Design to Concrete

06:00 - 24 October, 2016

Update: We've added a video of the process to the article!

This year's Architectural Association (AA) Summer DLAB program culminated in Weave.X, the final working prototype of three-dimensionally interwoven concrete structures. Designed and fabricated by 21 participants from 11 countries in July and August, the prototype explores computational design, geometry rationalization, material behavior, and robotic fabrication as applied to concrete and robotic rod-bending techniques. The result is a network of self-supporting concrete branches that envelop an amorphous enclosure.

© Architectural Association © Architectural Association © Architectural Association © Architectural Association +12

Chimney Café / GOA

22:00 - 9 May, 2016
Chimney Café / GOA, © Lu Hengzhong
© Lu Hengzhong

© Lu Hengzhong © Lu Hengzhong © Lu Hengzhong © Lu Hengzhong +13

  • Architects

  • Location

    Shanghai, Shanghai, China
  • Design Team

    WANG Yan, WANG Yibo
  • Developer

    Chimney (Shanghai) Culture Development Co., Ltd
  • Construction

    Shanghai Puhong Construction Engineering Co., Ltd
  • Area

    60.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2015
  • Photographs

AD Classics: Bergisel Ski Jump / Zaha Hadid Architects

03:00 - 9 May, 2016
AD Classics: Bergisel Ski Jump / Zaha Hadid Architects, © Helene Binet
© Helene Binet

Situated on the peak of Bergisel Mountain above the picturesque alpine city of Innsbruck, Austria, the Bergisel Ski Jump represents the contemporary incarnation of a historic landmark. Designed by Zaha Hadid between 1999 and 2002, the Ski Jump is a study in formal expression: its sweeping lines and minimalist aesthetic create a sense of graceful, high-speed motion, reflecting the dynamic sensation of a ski jump in a monumental structure that stands above the historic center of Innsbruck and the mountain slopes around.

© Helene Binet Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects © Helene Binet +27

Santiago Calatrava Designs 3 New Bridges for Huashan

12:00 - 9 December, 2015
Santiago Calatrava Designs 3 New Bridges for Huashan , View of the canal. Image © Santiago Calatrava LLC
View of the canal. Image © Santiago Calatrava LLC

Santiago Calatrava has been commissioned to design a trio of bridges in the Chinese city of Huashan, east of Wuhan. The three steel bridges - Xihu, Xianbi and Lincong - will span 1.5 kilometers of the city's new Yangtze River canal, providing access to pedestrians, cyclists and vehicles. 

“Architecture is one of the art forms best able to improve and revitalize cities both artistically and functionally,” said Calatrava. “The Huashan project is a clear example of how an urban element, key to the successful growth of the city, can at the same time improve the quality of life for its citizens, thanks to an integration of all three bridges and the creation of boulevards on the banks of the canal.”

The Apple and the Leaf: On How in Architecture There Are No Indisputable Truths

10:00 - 2 October, 2015
The Apple and the Leaf: On How in Architecture There Are No Indisputable Truths, Villa Além / Valerio Olgiati. Image © Archive Olgiati
Villa Além / Valerio Olgiati. Image © Archive Olgiati

For many centuries, the demands of gravity appeared to give architecture one requirement that was largely unquestionable: that structures must rise vertically. However, with the advent of steel it was revealed that this limit had not been provided by gravity but by our own limited technologies. In this text, originally published by Domus Magazine in Italian and shared with ArchDaily by the author, Alberto Campo Baeza reflects on the architectural freedom offered by steel structures and the arbitrariness they bring to architectural space.

Isaac Newton was resting under an apple-tree in his garden when an apple fell on his head. Being endowed with such a privileged head and thoughts faster than lightning, he rose forthwith from his afternoon nap and set about calculating the acceleration of gravity.

Had Sir Isaac Newton had a little more patience and had he taken his time in getting to his feet, he might have noticed how, following the apple, a few leaves also fell from that same apple-tree, and while they fell, they did so in quite a different manner to the apple.

"I am writing this text in honor of the architect Valerio Olgiati, after seeing his very beautiful house in Portugal". Image © Archive Olgiati Leutschenbach School / Christian Kerez. Image Courtesy of Christian Kerez Rufo House / Alberto Campo Baeza. "But I, who have always defended orthogonal structures, also argue that structures do not always necessarily have to be orthogonal". Image © Javier Callejas Apartment Building on Forsterstrasse / Christian Kerez. From the architect's description: "The concrete wall slices are placed one above the other, suspended under each other or cantilevered. They form the loadbearing structure... their structurally essential organization remains hidden behind the appearance of a free, open-ended design". Image © Walter Mair +6

aarhus arkitekterne Designs Revolutionary Proton Therapy Center for Denmark

07:00 - 2 September, 2015
aarhus arkitekterne Designs Revolutionary Proton Therapy Center for Denmark, Courtesy of aarhus arkitekterne
Courtesy of aarhus arkitekterne

Danish practice aarhus arkitekterne has won a competition to design the new Proton Therapy Centre for advanced cancer treatment in Aarhus, Denmark. As “the most advanced radiation center to date and the only one of its kind in Denmark,” as well as one of only a few in the world, the Centre will undoubtedly become a pioneer in cancer treatment.

Designed from the inside out, the building’s façades are meant to convey the function of the interior, “and tell the story of precision, which is they key component of proton therapy as a form of treatment,” according to the architects. Thus, the atrium of the building becomes central to its orientation, providing not only an axis, but also a source of natural lighting.

ARO and Heery Design Nippert Stadium Expansion for University of Cincinnati

08:00 - 28 July, 2015
ARO and Heery Design Nippert Stadium Expansion for University of Cincinnati, Courtesy of The University of Cincinnati
Courtesy of The University of Cincinnati

Architecture Research Office (ARO) and Heery International have designed the West Pavilion, a 115,000 square-foot extension to the University of Cincinnati’s Nippert Stadium. Set at one of America’s most historic college football venues, the new expansion will stretch 450 feet in length —about half of the stadium—and “will introduce the program’s first true premium seating, club spaces, and high-end press facilities.”

In addition to being a part of university-wide expansions, the project is the centerpiece of the $86 million renovation of Nippert Stadium itself, which includes adding more restrooms and concessions, and better pedestrian circulation.

Courtesy of The University of Cincinnati Courtesy of The University of Cincinnati Courtesy of The University of Cincinnati Courtesy of The University of Cincinnati +17

Bortolotto Unveils Design for Rosalie Sharp Pavilion in Toronto

14:00 - 21 June, 2015
Bortolotto Unveils Design for Rosalie Sharp Pavilion in Toronto, Exterior View. Image Courtesy of Bortolotto
Exterior View. Image Courtesy of Bortolotto

The Ontario College of Art and Design University (OCAD U) has commissioned Toronto firm Bortolotto to transform the university’s main office building into the Rosalie Sharp Pavilion. The office will be wrapped in a technologically-responsive layer, transforming it into a multi-use, student work and exhibition space and transforming the corner of Dundas and McCaul streets into an interactive gateway for the campus.

Competition Entry: AECOM Proposes Transport Center for Solana Beach

08:00 - 19 June, 2015
Competition Entry: AECOM Proposes Transport Center for Solana Beach, Courtesy of AECOM LA Design Studio
Courtesy of AECOM LA Design Studio

AECOM has designed a preliminary study for a mixed-use transportation development in Solana Beach, California, as part of a response for a RFP (Request for Proposal). Located near major roads and connected to railroads, the project proposal consists of a combination of retail stores and restaurants, providing transit users with leisure spaces on their travels, in addition to parking for the nearby AMTRAK train station. 

Courtesy of AECOM LA Design Studio Courtesy of AECOM LA Design Studio Courtesy of AECOM LA Design Studio Courtesy of AECOM LA Design Studio +15

MX3D to 3D Print a Bridge in Mid-Air over Amsterdam Canal

06:00 - 16 June, 2015
MX3D to 3D Print a Bridge in Mid-Air over Amsterdam Canal, © Joris Laarman for MX3D
© Joris Laarman for MX3D

Amsterdam already has over 1,200 bridges throughout its canals, with some dating as far back as the 17th century, but the city is about to add one more in correspondence with its growing 3D printing industry. Dutch start-up MX3D has partnered with Joris Laarman Lab, Heijmans, Autodesk, and several other supporters, in a collaboration that will create an intricate steel pedestrian bridge made by 3D printers.

Richard Serra's East-West/West-East Rises in the Qatari Desert

17:30 - 30 April, 2015
Richard Serra's East-West/West-East Rises in the Qatari Desert , “East-West/West-East” / Richard Serra. Image © Nelson Garrido
“East-West/West-East” / Richard Serra. Image © Nelson Garrido

A new sculpture has risen in the desert of Qatar: “East-West/West-East,” Richard Serra's second public commission by the Gulf nation. Sited in a barren landscape that was suggested by Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa al-Thani, the former Emir, the installation is comprised of four steel plates incrementally placed and standing perpendicular to the ground.

Much like Serra's first Qatari sculpture - "7" in Doha - the German rolled steel structure will oxidize, changing from gray to orange and eventually a dark amber, much like the Seagram Building in midtown, said Serra in an interview with The New Yorker. The artist hopes it will become a landmark within the country. 

A selection of images from architecture photographer Nelson Garrido, after the break. 

“East-West/West-East” / Richard Serra. Image © Nelson Garrido “East-West/West-East” / Richard Serra. Image © Nelson Garrido “East-West/West-East” / Richard Serra. Image © Nelson Garrido “East-West/West-East” / Richard Serra. Image © Nelson Garrido +12

Santiago Calatrava's Florida Polytechnic Building Awarded "Best in Steel Construction" by AISC

11:00 - 22 April, 2015
Santiago Calatrava's Florida Polytechnic Building Awarded "Best in Steel Construction" by AISC, © Alan Karchmer for Santiago Calatrava
© Alan Karchmer for Santiago Calatrava

Last week, the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) presented its Innovation Design in Engineering and Architecture with Structural Steel Awards program. Recognizing exemplary work in steel for both its architectural and structural merits, the AISC awarded Santiago Calatrava's Innovation, Science, and Technology (IST) building at Florida Polytechnic University in Lakeland, Florida with the national award in the $15 million to $75 million category.

Winners Named for 2013-2014 Steel Design Student Competition: Border Crossing

01:00 - 29 August, 2014
Winners Named for 2013-2014 Steel Design Student Competition: Border Crossing, Donovan Dunkley, Vail Nuguid & Alexia Sanchezm, City College of New York. Image Courtesy of Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture
Donovan Dunkley, Vail Nuguid & Alexia Sanchezm, City College of New York. Image Courtesy of Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture

In Borders: A Very Short Introduction, Hagan Diener writes, "…every border has a story. Every line on a map, every maker in the landscape, was derived from some complex negation of power and culture." It is this potency of meaning that makes the physical and conceptual border such a fascinating site. The 2013-2014 ACSA administered and AISC sponsored Steel Design Student Competition challenged students to design a border crossing station addressing the complex factors of cross-border relationships, using structural steel as the primary material. Learn more about the competition and the winning projects after the break.

Donovan Dunkley, Vail Nuguid & Alexia Sanchezm, City College of New York. Image Courtesy of Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture Kyle Marren, Ryerson University. Image Courtesy of Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture Jorge Cornet, Adam Schroth & Thomas Soldiviero, Catholic University of America. Image Courtesy of Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture Donovan Dunkley, Vail Nuguid & Alexia Sanchezm, City College of New York. Image Courtesy of Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture +19

Bamboo: A Viable Alternative to Steel Reinforcement?

01:00 - 8 June, 2014
Bamboo: A Viable Alternative to Steel Reinforcement?, bamboo reinforcement. Image © Professorship of Architecture and Con- struction Dirk E. Hebel, ETH 3) Zürich / FCL Singapore
bamboo reinforcement. Image © Professorship of Architecture and Con- struction Dirk E. Hebel, ETH 3) Zürich / FCL Singapore

Developing countries have the highest demand for steel-reinforced concrete, but often do not have the means to produce the steel to meet that demand.  Rather than put themselves at the mercy of a global market dominated by developed countries, Singapore’s Future Cities Laboratory suggests an alternative to this manufactured rarity: bamboo.  Abundant, sustainable, and extremely resilient, bamboo has potential in the future to become an ideal replacement in places where steel cannot easily be produced.