ArchDaily | Broadcasting Architecture Worldwidethe world's most visited architecture website
i

Sign up now and start saving and organizing your favorite architecture projects and photos

i

Find the most inspiring products for your projects in our Product Catalog.

i

Get the ArchDaily Chrome Extension and be inspired with every new tab. Install here »

All
Projects
Products
Events
Competitions

Italian Architecture

  1. ArchDaily
  2. Countries
  3. Italy

Latest projects in Italy

Latest news in Italy

"Don't Blame Me!": 6 Projects That Were Disowned by High-Profile Architects

09:30 - 22 May, 2017
"Don't Blame Me!": 6 Projects That Were Disowned by High-Profile Architects, © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/tseedmund/5351328288/'>Flickr user tseedmund</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
© Flickr user tseedmund licensed under CC BY 2.0

Construction is an exercise in frugality and compromise. To see their work realized, architects have to juggle the demands of developers, contractors, clients, engineers—sometimes even governments. The resulting concessions often leave designers with a bruised ego and a dissatisfying architectural result. While these architects always do their best to rectify any problems, some disputes get so heated that the architect feels they have no choice but to walk away from their own work. Here are 6 of the most notable examples:

Marvel at the Scope, Scale and Splendor of Ancient Rome With This Virtual Fly-Through

12:00 - 10 May, 2017
Marvel at the Scope, Scale and Splendor of Ancient Rome With This Virtual Fly-Through, Map of the Roman Forum, taken from Ball Platner's "The Topography and Monuments of Ancient Rome" (1904). Image via Wikimedia Commons (Public Domain)
Map of the Roman Forum, taken from Ball Platner's "The Topography and Monuments of Ancient Rome" (1904). Image via Wikimedia Commons (Public Domain)

We can all recognise the great architectural landmarks of Ancient Rome: the Pantheon, the Colosseum, Trajan's Column – but do you know how they originally appeared or, perhaps more interestingly, how they sat within the context of the historic city? In this captivating 14-minute-long virtual fly-through by the Kahn Academy and Smarthistory, a YouTube channel dedicated to historical video essays, the ancient splendor of the Eternal City (at around 320AD) is presented alongside expert commentary.

Study Determines That This is (Probably) What Andrea Palladio Looked Like

04:00 - 17 April, 2017
Study Determines That This is (Probably) What Andrea Palladio Looked Like, Left: seemingly accurate portrait of Palladio purchased at an antiques store in New Jersey, USA. Right: seemingly accurate portrait of Palladio in a private collection in Moscow, Russia. Image via The New York Times / Palladio Museum
Left: seemingly accurate portrait of Palladio purchased at an antiques store in New Jersey, USA. Right: seemingly accurate portrait of Palladio in a private collection in Moscow, Russia. Image via The New York Times / Palladio Museum

In today's culture of narcissism and celebrity it's an assumed expectation that faces can be put to names. Even in 16th Century Europe, the large majority of notable persons had a likeness made of themselves and displayed for posterity – save for architects, it seems. Take, for instance, Andrea Palladio (1508-1580) – the Renaissance style-setter and author of the groundbreaking treatise The Four Books on Architecture, the seminal text of which inspired the likes of Thomas Jefferson. If challenged, could you easily put a face to Palladio's name? There is no accurate, agreed-upon "official" portrait of the architect – until now, that is.

Six of the Best Spatial Installations at Salone del Mobile 2017

07:30 - 14 April, 2017
Six of the Best Spatial Installations at Salone del Mobile 2017, nendo. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
nendo. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

With the 2017 Salone del Mobile now behind us, photographer Laurian Ghinitoiu has shared a collection of photographs from Milan Design Week. From housing prototypes to immersive "digital installations", the annual design show—which is often touted to be the fourth largest of any kind in the world—this year brought together a wide range of practitioners and design companies. In Milan, unusual collaborations are the order of the day.

MAD Unveils Proposal to Transform Milan's Dilapidated Railyards

10:30 - 10 April, 2017
MAD Unveils Proposal to Transform Milan's Dilapidated Railyards, Historical Future: Milan Reborn, Scalo Farini and Valtellina
Historical Future: Milan Reborn, Scalo Farini and Valtellina

In an presentation at Milan Design Week 2017, MAD Architects has revealed their proposal for the Scali Milano project, which invited five international firms (MAD, Stefano Boeri Architetti, Mecanoo, MIRALLES TAGLIABUE EMBT, and Cino Zucchi Architetti) to design a community-reactivation masterplan aimed at transforming a series of Milan's neglected railyards into "productive social landscapes that establish a harmony between Milan’s citizenry, the larger metropolitan region, and the natural environment." 

Titled Historical Future: Milan Reborn, MAD's scheme proposes reorganizing the railyards into a series of interconnected micro-systems that follow five spatial concepts: “City of Connections,” “City of Green,” “City of Living,” “City of Culture,” and “City of Resources.”

Zaha Hadid Architects Creates Immersive Digital Installation for Samsung at Milan Design Week

11:30 - 4 April, 2017
Zaha Hadid Architects Creates Immersive Digital Installation for Samsung at Milan Design Week, © Luke Hayes. Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects
© Luke Hayes. Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects

Zaha Hadid Architects has collaborated with Samsung and digital art and design collective Universal Everything to create an immersive technology installation at the 2017 Milan Design Week, taking place this week in the Italian city. Named ‘Unconfined,’ the pavilion will showcase Samsung’s new Galaxy S8 smartphone by leading visitors through an immersive environment inspired by the device.

This 6-Axis Robot Arm Can 3D Print Fiberglass Composites

08:00 - 26 March, 2017
This 6-Axis Robot Arm Can 3D Print Fiberglass Composites, Atropos was developed by architects and engineers at the Politecnico di Milano's +Lab. Image Courtesy of Politecnico di Milano
Atropos was developed by architects and engineers at the Politecnico di Milano's +Lab. Image Courtesy of Politecnico di Milano

A team of architects and engineers at the Politecnico di Milano in Italy have unveiled Atropos, a six-axis robotic arm capable of printing continuous fiber composites. The one of a kind robot was developed by +Lab, the 3D printing laboratory at the Politecnico, who have taken inspiration from fibres found in the natural world. Through a technology known as Continuous Fiber Composites Smart Manufacturing, Atropos has the potential to create large, complex structures to aid the design and construction process.

Introducing GSAPP Conversations' Inaugural Episode: "Exhibition Models"

09:30 - 24 February, 2017
Introducing GSAPP Conversations' Inaugural Episode: "Exhibition Models"

We are pleased to announce a new content partnership between ArchDaily and Columbia University's Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation (GSAPP) in New York City.

BIG Selected to Design San Pellegrino Factory and Headquarters in Northern Italy

08:10 - 15 February, 2017
BIG Selected to Design San Pellegrino Factory and Headquarters in Northern Italy, © BIG
© BIG

Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) have been revealed as the winners of a competition to conceptualize and design a new headquarters and bottling plant for San Pellegrino, located in the terme of the same name in the Alps of northern Italy. Finalists included MVRDV, Snøhetta, and aMDL, each of whom presented their proposals in October last year.

A Roof for Verona’s Roman Amphitheater – Competition Winners Announced

08:00 - 6 February, 2017
A Roof for Verona’s Roman Amphitheater – Competition Winners Announced, Winning proposal by GMP. Image Courtesy of City of Verona Press Office
Winning proposal by GMP. Image Courtesy of City of Verona Press Office

The results of a competition to propose an openable roof over the Arena di Verona, Italy have been announced. Three winners were chosen out of eighty-seven proposals to cover the famous amphitheater, a defining symbol of the city of Verona. The competition was announced in March 2016 in order to protect the Roman monument from the elements and to ensure that it continues to provide quality entertainment to spectators two thousand years after its construction.

Loading... It could take a few seconds