ArchDaily | Broadcasting Architecture Worldwidethe world's most visited architecture website

Studio Gang Creates 7 Strategies to Reimagine Civic Spaces As Vibrant Urban Hubs

09:30 - 27 September, 2016
© Studio Gang
© Studio Gang

The Nolli Map made history when it was created in 1748, largely because of its focus on public spaces. With it, Giambattista Nolli highlighted the fact that public places don’t exclusively exist in the forms of streets and parks, but also in enclosed spaces. Yet the importance of our communal areas is constantly being undermined. Our public areas exist to promote inclusion and equal opportunities, but despite that they are being forgotten and abandoned, debilitating their ability to bind communities together.

Given that the main goal of Studio Gang’s newly released, free, downloadable booklet, Reimagining The Civic Commons has been to “help communities everywhere activate their civic commons,” then, it is unsurprising that the booklet includes graphic maps reminiscent of Nolli’s visual aim. The booklet, which arose from work funded by the Kresge Foundation and Knight Foundation, focuses on the advancement of 7 types of “existing assets”: libraries, parks, recreation centers, police stations, schools, streets and transit. Since the start of Studio Gang's research, a larger, $40 million initiative has begun—funded by the JPB Foundation, The Knight Foundation, The Kresge Foundation and The Rockefeller Foundation along with a multitude of local donors—with plans taking shape in Philadelphia, Chicago, Detroit, Memphis and Akron. The graphic guide is designed to offer adaptable, cost-effective and flexible approaches to these spaces, so that it can be implemented over time and in a variety of different communities. Read on for our summary of the report’s 7 strategies for improvement.

White Elephants: Over-Budget, Unsuccessful, and Embarrassing Architecture Projects From Around the World

09:50 - 26 September, 2016
White Elephants: Over-Budget, Unsuccessful, and Embarrassing Architecture Projects From Around the World

Not every piece of architecture can be an economic and social success. But there is one dreaded term reserved for only the mot wasteful of projects: "white elephants." The term comes from a story of the kings of Siam, now Thailand, who would reportedly gift sacred albino elephants to courtiers they didn't like. Refusing the gift from the king would have been unacceptable, but being sacred, these animals were forbidden from work, leading the courtier to financial ruin—a fact the kings knew all too well.

Of course, in architecture the term "white elephant" is used frequently to disparage certain projects, and whether a project is deserving of such infamy is usually a matter of perspective. Often eyesores or reminders of poorly spent funds, these projects refuse to be forgotten despite few wanting to remember them. Dotted around the world and across history, they all have the same thing in common: although they may (or may not) have once looked good on paper, they probably should have just stayed on paper.

This Recreation of Shakespeare's Globe Theatre is Built with Shipping Containers

09:30 - 25 September, 2016
This Recreation of Shakespeare's Globe Theatre is Built with Shipping Containers, Globe by Michigan Station, Detroit. Image Courtesy of The Container Globe
Globe by Michigan Station, Detroit. Image Courtesy of The Container Globe

All the world’s a stage – quite literally so, in the case of the Container Globe, a proposal to reconstruct a version of Shakespeare’s famous Globe Theatre with shipping containers. Staying true to the design of the original Globe Theatre in London, the Container Globe sees repurposed containers come together in a familiar form, but in steel rather than wood. Founder Angus Vail hopes this change in building component will give the Container Globe both a "punk rock" element and international mobility, making it as mobile as the shipping containers that make up its structure.

Globe by the Brooklyn Bridge, New York. Image Courtesy of The Container Globe View of Stage from the Yard. Image Courtesy of The Container Globe View from Upper Seating Gallery. Image Courtesy of The Container Globe Globe in Waitangi Park, Wellington NZ. Image Courtesy of The Container Globe +21

5 Initiatives That Show the Rise of Open Source Architecture

13:30 - 24 September, 2016
5 Initiatives That Show the Rise of Open Source Architecture

In architecture, perhaps the most remarkable change heralded by the 20th was the radical rethinking of housing provision which it brought, driven by a worldwide population explosion and the devastation of two world wars. Of course, Modernism’s reappraisal of the design and construction of housing was one part of this trajectory, but still Modernism was underpinned by a traditional process, needing clients, designers and contractors. Arguably more radical were a small number of fringe developments, such as mail-order houses in the US and Walter Segal’s DIY home designs in the UK. These initiatives sought to turn the traditional construction process on its head, empowering people to construct their own homes by providing materials and designs as cheaply as possible.

In the 21st century, the spirit of these fringe movements is alive and well, but the parameters have changed somewhat: with a rise in individualism, and new technologies sparking the “maker movement,” the focus has shifted away from providing people with the materials to construct a fixed design, and towards improving access to intellectual property, allowing more people to take advantage of cheap and effective designs. The past decade has seen a number of initiatives aimed at spreading open source architectural design--read on to find out about five of them.

Zaha Hadid Architects' Antwerp Port House Photographed by Laurian Ghinitoiu

09:15 - 23 September, 2016
Zaha Hadid Architects' Antwerp Port House Photographed by Laurian Ghinitoiu, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

Zaha Hadid Architects' new Port House in the Belgian city of Antwerp, which has been almost a decade in planning and construction, officially opens this week. A monumental new structure sits above a repurposed and renovated (formerly derelict) fire station, providing a new headquarters for Europe's second largest shipping port. Housing 500 staff, who will now be under the same roof for the first time, the building represents a sustainable and future-proof workplace for its employees. Photographer Laurian Ghinitoiu has visited to capture his unique perspective on this new addition to the city's crane-covered skyline.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu +42

Experience the "Brutal Faith" of Gottfried Böhm's Pilgrimage Church in Neviges

04:00 - 23 September, 2016
Experience the "Brutal Faith" of Gottfried Böhm's Pilgrimage Church in Neviges, Courtesy LOBBY Magazine. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Courtesy LOBBY Magazine. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

This exclusive photo essay by Laurian Ghinitoiu was originally commissioned for the fifth issue of LOBBY. Available later this month, the latest issue of the London-based magazine—published in cooperation with the Bartlett School of Architecture—examines the theme of Faith as "a fervent drive, a dangerous doctrine, a beautifully fragile yet enduring construct, an unapologetic excuse, a desperate call for attention and a timely consideration on architectural responsibility."

In 1986 the Pritzker Architecture Prize announced their first German laureate. In a speech at the ceremony in London’s Goldsmiths’ Hall, the Duke of Gloucester suggested that the prize “may not guarantee immorality,” inferring, perhaps, that not even the most prestigious award in architecture could compete with an œuvre so compact, focussed and enduring as that of Gottfried Böhm – a “son, grandson, husband, and father of architects.”

Courtesy LOBBY Magazine. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu Courtesy LOBBY Magazine. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu Courtesy LOBBY Magazine. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu Courtesy LOBBY Magazine. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu +24

5 Teams Shortlisted for Redesign of New York City's Port Authority Bus Terminal

14:20 - 22 September, 2016
5 Teams Shortlisted for Redesign of New York City's Port Authority Bus Terminal, via PABTcompetition.com
via PABTcompetition.com

The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey has revealed the five finalists teams in competition to redesign the Port Authority bus terminal in west Manhattan: Arcadis of New York, Archilier Architecture Consortium, Hudson Terminal Center Collaborative, Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects, and Perkins Eastman.

The Port Authority Bus Terminal International Design + Deliverability Competition challenged architects to reimagine the current terminal building, built in 1950 and expanded in 1979, for the demands of modernday ridership. The terminal currently accommodates approximately 220,000 passenger trips and more than 7,000 bus movements on an average weekday, with demand projected to increase to 270,000 daily peak-hour passengers by 2020, and as many as 337,000 daily peak-hour passengers by 2040.

Continue reading to see each of the designs.

The Sociology of Coliving: How WeLive Creates a "Third Place"

09:30 - 22 September, 2016
The Sociology of Coliving: How WeLive Creates a "Third Place", Courtesy of WeLive
Courtesy of WeLive

This article was originally published on Autodesk's Redshift publication (formerly known as Line//Shape//Space), under the title "Live, Work, Play: WeLive’s Live-Work Spaces Reveal a 'Third Place.'"

According to urban sociologist Ray Oldenburg, people need three types of places to live fulfilled, connected lives: Their “first place” (home) for private respite; their “second place” (work) for economic engagement; and their “third place,” a more amorphous arena used for reaffirming social bonds and community identities.

This third place can be a barbershop, neighborhood bar, community center, or even a public square. The desire for these three separate spheres drives how human environments are designed at a bedrock level, but increasing urbanism—as well as geographic and economic mobility—are collapsing these multiple spaces into one. The result is a new hybrid building type: a live-work multiunit dwelling that is home, office, and clubhouse.

Critical Round-Up: The National Museum of African American History and Culture

09:30 - 21 September, 2016
Critical Round-Up: The National Museum of African American History and Culture, © Darren Bradley
© Darren Bradley

A century since the founding of the National Memorial Association and the start of a campaign by African-American war veterans for a monument of African American culture, the National Museum of African American History and Culture will finally be opened on September 24th. The Museum took $540 million and four years to build, resulting in a striking, and refreshingly unorthodox, architectural construction on Washington DC’s National Mall. The Freelon Adjaye Bond/SmithGroup JJR team, led by Ghanaian-British architect David Adjaye, defiantly broke the white-marble-Corinthian-column convention, opting instead for a bronze-coated aluminum façade bound to provoke a reaction from the critics.

© Paul Clemence © Paul Clemence © Darren Bradley © Darren Bradley +19

Johnston Marklee Named Artistic Directors of the 2017 Chicago Architecture Biennial

08:10 - 21 September, 2016
© Eric Staudenmaier Courtesy Chicago Architecture Biennial
© Eric Staudenmaier Courtesy Chicago Architecture Biennial

The Chicago Architecture Biennial (CAB) has announced that Sharon Johnston and Mark Lee, of the Los Angeles-based firm Johnston Marklee, have been named Artistic Directors for the 2017 event. Following a successful inaugural run in 2015, the second edition of the biennial will take place from September 16 - December 31, 2017.

Speaking exclusively to ArchDaily, Artistic Directors Sharon Johnston and Mark Lee said:

We are thrilled with the invitation to be the Artistic Directors for the second edition of the largest exhibition of contemporary architecture in North America. To have a global platform to address current ideas and showcase the talent in the field of architecture in a city with such an extraordinary architectural pedigree is a once in a lifetime opportunity.

A Virtual Look Into Patrick Bateman's "American Psycho" Apartment

09:50 - 20 September, 2016
A Virtual Look Into Patrick Bateman's "American Psycho" Apartment, Courtesy of Archilogic
Courtesy of Archilogic

Patrick Bateman’s apartment from American Psycho is one of the most iconic locations in recent film history – his bone-white business card writ large. The sterile set design, by Gideon Ponte, is as impersonally creepy as Christian Bale’s performance (sure, put a telescope by the window, why don’t you; a serial killer without voyeurism just isn’t scary enough.) Archilogic’s interactive 3D model invites you to experience the apartment from the inside – without fear of an axe to the head.

BIG, MVRDV, Snøhetta, aMDL Unveil Proposals for San Pellegrino Bottling Plant Competition

13:05 - 19 September, 2016
BIG, MVRDV, Snøhetta, aMDL Unveil Proposals for San Pellegrino Bottling Plant Competition

BIG, MVRDV, Snøhetta and aMDL have unveiled images of their proposals for the redesign of San Pellegrino flagship factory and bottling plant located at the source of the mineral water in San Pellegrino Terme, Italy.

The competition brief asked architects to renovate and expand the historic home of San Pellegrino, the world’s leading sparkling mineral water company, with a “truly innovative and technologically-advanced design” aimed at integrating into the natural aesthetic of the surrounding terrain, while responding to the iconic identity of the S. Pellegrino brand.

Continue reading to see each proposal along with official descriptions from each firm.

11 Ways to Become a Better Architect (Without Doing Architecture)

07:00 - 19 September, 2016
11 Ways to Become a Better Architect (Without Doing Architecture), © Ariana Zilliacus
© Ariana Zilliacus

Architects are often noted for having bad work-life balance, a lot of stress and little free time. How can you take time off while still improving your skills as an architect? Can that time off even give you an extra edge? Compared to other fields, architecture stands out as a field in which you need to “know a little bit about everything." Thus, in order to live up to our name we must also do a little bit of everything, and as they say, a little goes a long way. So with that in mind, here are 11 activities which, while not obviously architectural, just might make you a better architect.

Basildon's "Failed" New Town: What Happened When We Built Utopia?

09:30 - 17 September, 2016

We are all familiar with the "utopian" towns of the 20th Century. Basildon, Essex, was one of the largest of those New Towns. It was founded in 1949, when Lewis Silkin, the Minister of town and country planning at the time, ambitiously predicted that "Basildon will become a city which people from all over the world will want to visit. It will be a place where all classes of community can meet freely together on equal terms and enjoy common cultural recreational facilities."[1] Nearly seventy years later, Basildon is left with a struggling local economy, splintered communities, and a fraction of the art and culture than what was originally hoped for. "New Town Utopia" is a documentary film that confronts this concrete reality with a question: “What happened when we built Utopia?”

Basildon Fire Station. Image © <a href='http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/261329'>Geograph user GaryReggae</a> licensed under <a href='http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> BasildonTown Square. Image © <a href='http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/2575026'>Geograph user Stephen McKay</a> licensed under <a href='http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> Freedom House, Basildon. Image © <a href='http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/261326'>Geograph user GaryReggae</a> licensed under <a href='http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> Bell Tower, St. Martin's Church, Basildon. Image © <a href='http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/335962'>Geograph user Julieanne Savage</a> licensed under <a href='http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> +6

TED Talk: MASS Design Group's Michael Murphy Asks “What More Can Architecture Do?”

09:30 - 16 September, 2016

In this TED Talk, co-founder of MASS Design Group, Michael Murphy, presents the question “what more can architecture do?” as the springboard philosophy behind the practice. Following a trajectory of MASS’s projects, Murphy reflects upon their practice’s progress in seeing architecture as an opportunity to invest in the future of communities.

When Droplets Create Space: A Look at Liquid Architecture

09:30 - 15 September, 2016
When Droplets Create Space: A Look at Liquid Architecture, Light in Water, 2015. Paris. Architects: DGT Architects. Photographer: <a href='http://www.takuji-shimmura.com/'>Takuji Shimmura</a>. Image © DGT Architects
Light in Water, 2015. Paris. Architects: DGT Architects. Photographer: Takuji Shimmura. Image © DGT Architects

Throughout the past century, architecture's relationship with water has developed along a variety of different paths. With his “Fallingwater” house, for example, the American master Frank Lloyd Wright confronted the dramatic flow of water with strong horizontal lines to heighten the experience of nature. Since then, architecture's use of water has become more varied and complex. A space made almost purely of water emerged with Isamu Noguchi's design at the Osaka World Expo: glistening water appeared to fall from nowhere and glowed in the dark. Later with digitalization and fluid forms as design parameters, the focus shifted towards liquid architecture made of water and light. The interpretations have ranged from architectural forms modeled after literal drops of water, like Bernhard Franken´s visionary “Bubble” for BMW, to spectacular walk-in installations made of lines of water, transformed into pixels by light.

Icelandic Pavilion. Hannover, Expo 2000. Image © Thomas Schielke Blur Building. Exposition Pavilion: Swiss Expo, Yverdon-Les-Bains, 2002. Architects: Diller Scofidio + Renfro. Image © Diller Scofidio + Renfro Olafur Eliasson: The reflective corridor, Draft to stop the free fall, 2002. (Der reflektierende Korridor, Entwurf zum Stoppen des freien Falls, 2002). Photographer: Werner J. Hannappel. Courtesy of Centre for International Light Art Unna, Germany. Image © 2002 Olafur Eliasson Luce Tempo Luogo, 2011. Milano. Architects: DGT Architects. Photographer: Daici Ano. Image © DGT Architects +20

REM: A Retroactive, Redacted Study of the World’s Greatest Living Architect

11:15 - 14 September, 2016
REM: A Retroactive, Redacted Study of the World’s Greatest Living Architect, Rem Koolhaas, the eponymous protagonist of "REM". Image © Tomas Koolhaas
Rem Koolhaas, the eponymous protagonist of "REM". Image © Tomas Koolhaas

In the canon of great Dutch architects sit a number of renowned practitioners, from Berlage to Van Berkel. Based on influence alone, Rem Koolhaas—the grandson of architect Dirk Roosenburg and son of author and thinker Anton Koolhaas—stands above all others and has, over the course of a career spanning four decades, sought to redefine the role of the architect from a regional autarch to a globally-active shaper of worlds – be they real or imagined. A new film conceived and produced by Tomas Koolhaas, the LA-based son of its eponymous protagonist, attempts to biographically represent the work of OMA by “expos[ing] the human experience of [its] architecture through dynamic film.” No tall order.

Mark – a homeless man, filmed in Seattle Public Library (USA). Image © Tomas Koolhaas CCTV (China). Image © Tomas Koolhaas De Rotterdam (The Netherlands). Image © Tomas Koolhaas Seattle Public Library (USA). Image © Tomas Koolhaas +17

AD Classics: Planetario Galileo Galilei / Enrique Jan

06:00 - 14 September, 2016
AD Classics: Planetario Galileo Galilei / Enrique Jan, via Flickr user: Luis Argerich CC BY–NC 2.0
via Flickr user: Luis Argerich CC BY–NC 2.0

Within the Buenos Aires neighborhood of Palermo in a park designed by the French landscape architect Charles Thays, the Parque 3 de Febrero (February 3rd Park) , sits the Galileo Galilei Planetarium. Inaugurated on December 20, 1966, it was born of the idea of human evolution and the need to show it in architecture. The building exists as an instrument or bridge between the scientific world and the citizens of the city of Buenos Aires.

Designed by Argentine architect Enrique Jan, the building establishes a relationship between astronomy and architecture through its shared components: mathematics and geometry. Thanks to its location and unique shape, it is currently one of the iconic images of the city and the scene of many scientific, cultural, and festive events.