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In "Horizontal City," 24 Architects Reconsider Architectural Interiors at 2017 Chicago Architecture Biennial

10:20 - 25 September, 2017

Horizontal City is one of two collective exhibitions (the other being Vertical City) at the 2017 Chicago Architecture Biennial. 24 architects were tasked by artistic directors Sharon Johnston and Mark Lee to "reconsider the status of the architectural interior" by referencing a photograph of a canonical interior from any time period.

Their challenge was in considering the forms and ways that their selection "might extrapolate out from the cropped photographic frame into a spatial and lifestyle construction across a larger, horizontal site" – in this case, a field of plinths, the size and positioning of which is a direct reference to the footprint of Mies van der Rohe's 1947 plan for the IIT Campus in Chicago.

Installation Showing the Perspective of a Self-Driving Car Aims to Evoke Empathy for Artificial Intelligence

09:30 - 25 September, 2017
Installation Showing the Perspective of a Self-Driving Car Aims to Evoke Empathy for Artificial Intelligence, Courtesy of Guillermo Fernandez-Abascal, Urtzi Grau and Daniel Perlin
Courtesy of Guillermo Fernandez-Abascal, Urtzi Grau and Daniel Perlin

Driver Less Vision, an installation at the 2017 Seoul Biennale of Architecture and Urbanism by Guillermo Fernandez-Abascal, Urtzi Grau and Daniel Perlin, is an immersive 3D video experience comprised of spatial scans of Seoul, projected into a dome and paired with surround sound. The supporting audio is the internal monologue of a personified autonomous vehicle, driving through the streets of a future Seoul, Korea. The installation transports vierers to the front seat of the autonomous vehicle, providing a new perspective of traversing cities—through the car’s point of view.

Courtesy of Guillermo Fernandez-Abascal, Urtzi Grau and Daniel Perlin Courtesy of Guillermo Fernandez-Abascal, Urtzi Grau and Daniel Perlin Courtesy of Guillermo Fernandez-Abascal, Urtzi Grau and Daniel Perlin Courtesy of Guillermo Fernandez-Abascal, Urtzi Grau and Daniel Perlin + 9

All-In-One Structure Solves Flooding, Parking and the Lack of Green Space in Cities

08:00 - 25 September, 2017
All-In-One Structure Solves Flooding, Parking and the Lack of Green Space in Cities, Courtesy of THIRD NATURE
Courtesy of THIRD NATURE

As Earth’s population continues to grow, so does car traffic and issues related to climate change. It has been estimated about 30% of urban roadway congestion are drivers searching for a place to park. Car culture puts the pressure on cities to build more parking garages, which usually win out over green parks. Meanwhile, climate change continues to challenge cities to handle a great deal of stormwater. The 2017 Atlantic hurricane season is proof of this - as of Monday, 13 named storms have formed in the Atlantic ocean, costing 210 lives and counting. 

THIRD NATURE, a Danish architecture firm, designed a solution for the modern-day urban issues of flooding, parking and lacking green spaces with their project, POP-UP. A stacked green space, car park, and water reservoir, from top to bottom respectively, POP-UP uses Archimedes’ principle to store water and create floating space to store cars.

Courtesy of THIRD NATURE Courtesy of THIRD NATURE Courtesy of THIRD NATURE Courtesy of THIRD NATURE + 14

Social Agenda vs Social Media: Reviewing the 2017 Chicago Architecture Biennial

09:30 - 24 September, 2017
Social Agenda vs Social Media: Reviewing the 2017 Chicago Architecture Biennial, © Steve Hall
© Steve Hall

While architecture exhibitions have a tendency to be drab affairs with poorly displayed poster boards and reams of intellectualized text spouting pseudo-complex ideas, the Chicago Architecture Biennial stands out for its undeniable sense of playfulness. From its central HQ to the fringe performance events, this exhibition is bright, fun and Instagram-ready.

Chicago, like Venice, is blessed when it comes to architecture, making the city an ideal home for a recurring architecture show. The importance of this year’s iteration, the second after its inaugural event in 2015 (thus confirming its status as an actual “Biennial”), is clear. And the curators, Sharon Johnston and Mark Lee from LA-based practice Johnston Marklee, seem determined to grab people’s attention.

Which Building Has the World's Fastest-Moving Elevator?

09:30 - 23 September, 2017
Which Building Has the World's Fastest-Moving Elevator?, via Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat
via Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat

The targeted maximum wait time in office building elevators is 20 seconds—it just feels like 2 minutes when you’re in a rush. But how quickly are the elevators actually moving?

The fastest installed elevator reaches speeds of 67 feet per second (20.5 meters per second), or 46 miles per hour (73.8 kilometers per hour) in the Shanghai Tower. Not only does the Gensler-designed Shanghai Tower boast the fastest elevator, but also the longest continuous run of 1,898 feet of the 2,073-foot tower (578.5 of 632 meters), as revealed in a recent study by the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH). At these speeds, you can reach the 119th floor in 55 seconds.

via Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat via Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat via Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat via Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat + 6

How Narinder Sagoo And Foster + Partners Are Turning Architectural Preconceptions On Their Head (With A Pencil)

14:45 - 22 September, 2017
How Narinder Sagoo And Foster + Partners Are Turning Architectural Preconceptions On Their Head (With A Pencil), © Foster + Partners
© Foster + Partners

This short article, written by the author and critic Jonathan Glancey, coincides with the launch of the inaugural Architecture Drawing Prize – a competition curated by the World Architecture Festival, the Sir John Soane's Museum, and Make. The deadline for the award has been extended to September 25, 2017, and successful entries will be exhibited in both London and Berlin.

For architects, says Narinder Sagoo, Head of Design Communications at Foster + Partners, drawings are about story telling. They are also a highly effective way of raising questions about design projects. Although the history of architecture—certainly since the Italian Renaissance—has been mapped by compelling drawings asserting the primacy, and reflecting the glory, of fully resolved buildings, there is another strain of visualisation that has allowed architects to think through projects free of preconceptions.

© Foster + Partners © Foster + Partners © Foster + Partners © Foster + Partners + 8

15 Must-See Installations at the 2017 Chicago Architecture Biennial

12:00 - 22 September, 2017

With the 2017 Chicago Architecture Biennial in full swing and open to the public until January 7, 2017, we've scoured the galleries, halls and corridors of the Chicago Cultural Center to bring you our favorite fifteen installations. Documented through the lens of Laurian Ghinitoiu and assembled by our Editorial Team on location, this selection intends to shed light on the breadth, scope and preoccupations of Make New History – the largest architecture event in North America.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 45

DesignIntelligence Announces Top Architecture Schools for 2017–2018

11:55 - 22 September, 2017
DesignIntelligence Announces Top Architecture Schools for 2017–2018, Milstein Hall at Cornell University / OMA. Image © Matthew Carbone
Milstein Hall at Cornell University / OMA. Image © Matthew Carbone

Which programs in the United States are best preparing students for a future in the profession? DesignIntelligence emailed architecture and interior design professionals from around the US and asked them to answer this question, using their answers to rank schools from the perspective of those with the power to hire graduates. According to the report, DesignIntelligence surveyed "a total of 2,654 hiring professionals from 1,923 professional practice organizations" in the fields of architecture, landscape architecture, and interior design.

The 15 Most Popular Architectural Materials & Products of 2017

09:30 - 22 September, 2017

What are the best construction materials and products on the market? Which are the most popular? Thanks to the activities of our readers, we're beginning to find some answers to these questions. Combining the use of two ArchDaily tools, many of our readers have saved their favorite architectural materials and products—directly from our catalog—into their personalized My ArchDaily folders.

We have investigated the data from the first 6 months of 2017 to identify and share the most popular products from our catalog with you. What do these products have that make them so popular? Would you apply them on your next project?

Georgia's Soviet Architectural Heritage Captured by Photographers Roberto Conte and Stefano Perego

09:30 - 21 September, 2017
Tbilisi. The Palace of Ceremonies/Rituals, by Victor Djorbenadze (1984-1985). Image © Roberto Conte
Tbilisi. The Palace of Ceremonies/Rituals, by Victor Djorbenadze (1984-1985). Image © Roberto Conte

The Republic of Georgia’s past is defined by turbulence and a struggle for identity. A former republic of the USSR, Georgia is perhaps best known as the birthplace of Joseph Stalin. The nation's history has been anything but calm, and remnants of the architectural past provide a glimpse into the nation that was.

The country's remaining Soviet landmarks give Georgia an air of being caught between the past and the present. Italian photographers Roberto Conte and Stefano Perego capture this in their photo series, Soviet Architecture Heritage in Georgia, with a compilation of photos that highlights the existing Soviet heritage in Georgian architecture today. 

Tbilisi. Archaeological Museum (1988). Image © Stefano Perego Zhinvali. Aragveli monument. Image © Stefano Perego Tbilisi. Technical Library, by G. Bichiasshvili (1985). Image © Roberto Conte Tbilisi. The Palace of Ceremonies/Rituals, by Victor Djorbenadze (1984-1985). Image © Roberto Conte + 12

Many Feared Dead or Trapped After Earthquake Topples Buildings Throughout Mexico

09:15 - 20 September, 2017
Many Feared Dead or Trapped After Earthquake Topples Buildings Throughout Mexico, The destruction of a building in Mexico following the 2017 earthquake. Image via Infobae
The destruction of a building in Mexico following the 2017 earthquake. Image via Infobae

Following the devastating earthquake measuring 7.1 in magnitude that struck Mexico yesterday at 13:14 local time, many—over 200 people at the time of writing—are feared either dead or trapped in collapsed buildings or unsafe structures. While rescue efforts continue and information surrounding the scope of devastation is preliminary, schools are closed indefinitely and major companies and organizations have requested their employees not to work.

The death toll continues to rise while ArchDaily México, which is located in Mexico City, reports wide-reaching destruction of the built fabric of the capital. Footage captured by terrified residents show the final moments of buildings—many taller than four stories—that were reduced to dust and debris in seconds.

3 Reasons Why Excel is the Ultimate BIM Sidekick

09:30 - 19 September, 2017
3 Reasons Why Excel is the Ultimate BIM Sidekick, Courtesy of ArchSmarter
Courtesy of ArchSmarter

This article was originally published by ArchSmarter.

Have you ever played the party game “telephone”? You know the one, where you tell something to the person next to you and they pass it on to the person next to them and so on down the line. Inevitably, your original message is badly mangled and misappropriated by the time it gets back to you. Everyone gets a good laugh at how far the end message is from your original one.

13 Weird, Surprising Architecture Facts You've Probably Never Heard

09:30 - 18 September, 2017
13 Weird, Surprising Architecture Facts You've Probably Never Heard

The history of humans building shelters goes back over 10,000 years. Over this time, the human need to build was distilled into the profession of architecture, and in the process it attracted all manner of eccentric, visionary, and stubborn individuals. In light of both architecture's long history and its abundance of colorful characters, it's no surprise that it's full of surprising and unlikely stories. From Lincoln Logs and the Olympics to Ouija boards and 9/11, here are 13 architecture-related facts you may not have previously known.

How VR Is Helping Researchers Understand the Phenomenology Behind Light in Architecture

12:30 - 17 September, 2017

“How shall we hew the sun / Split it and make blocks / To build a ruddy palace?” wondered Wallace Stevens in his 1918 poem Architecture for the Adoration of Beauty. Inspired by the verse, in his essay The Room, the Street and Human Agreement, Louis Kahn paraphrased “What slice of the sun enters your room?” The great architect also spent his entire career experimenting with those dual protagonists: light and shadow. Kahn’s obsession with light, and in particular the architectural control of it, influenced countless architects, including Peter Zumthor and Tadao Ando.

Kynthia Chamilothori shares that fascination. A 2014 Architectural Engineering graduate from the Technical University of Crete, where she received the Limmat Stiftung Excellence Award, and current PhD candidate in the Laboratory of Integrated Performance In Design (LIPID) in EPFL under the supervision of Prof. Marilyne Andersen and Dr. Jan Wienold, Chamilothori’s doctoral research project focuses on how the patterns of light and shadow shape the way we perceive architectural spaces. But, while Kahn and other architects throughout history have relied on little more than intuition, Chamilothori is using far more scientific methods, working with a tool that wasn’t available to the great masters: virtual reality. Through experiments in virtual and real environments, Chamilothori investigates the impact of facade and daylight patterns on the atmosphere of a space. Her PhD is supported by a grant awarded by the Velux Stiftung Foundation.

This Quirky Architecture Couple’s Instagrams are #instagoals

09:30 - 16 September, 2017

A post shared by Anna Devís (@anniset) on

Whether they're pretending facade details are raindrops or peeking out of Ricardo Bofill’s La Muralla Roja, Daniel Rueda and Anna Devis introduce a unique perspective on the city. The Valencia-based duo are #couplegoals, and their Instagram accounts reveal their fun, quirky personalities and love for the built environment.

Scrolling through their feeds, viewers get a glimpse of the couple’s travels through whimsical portraits which celebrate the beauty of architecture. The adorable duo playfully interacts with their surroundings, using the city as their stage and architecture—and each—other as characters.

Curators Johnston Marklee Introduce the 2017 Chicago Architecture Biennial, "Make New History"

11:15 - 15 September, 2017

As the 2017 Chicago Architecture Biennial prepares to open its doors, curators Sharon Johnston and Mark Lee (Johnston Marklee) introduce Make New History – the theme of the second edition of North America's largest architecture and design exhibition.

Understanding the trace of history is more important than ever. Maybe now it's a good time to take stock and reevaluate to see what architecture could do better, and there are certain issues that other disciplines address better than architecture itself.

Herzog & de Meuron’s Museu Blau in Barcelona Through the Lens of Denis Esakov

09:30 - 15 September, 2017
Herzog & de Meuron’s Museu Blau in Barcelona Through the Lens of Denis Esakov, © Denis Esakov
© Denis Esakov

We look for materials which are as intelligent, versatile and complex as natural phenomena, in other words materials which don't just appeal to the eyes of the astounded art critic, but are also really efficient and appeal to all our senses.
– Jacques Herzog

Like several other works of architecture by Herzog & de Meuron the Forum Building, known since the 2012 relocation of Barcelona's Museu de les Ciències Naturals as the Museu Blau, is remarkable for its sensitive use of materials. A triangular mass of gray-blue concrete punctured and split in places to reveal the contrasting use of reflective planes, the building is a hard one to ignore, especially for an architectural photographer.

© Denis Esakov © Denis Esakov © Denis Esakov © Denis Esakov + 16

In "Vertical City," 16 Contemporary Architects Reinterpret the Tribune Tower at 2017 Chicago Architecture Biennial

20:55 - 14 September, 2017
© Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

In a large-scale, central installation at the 2017 Chicago Architecture Biennial, the likes of 6a architects, Barozzi Veiga, Kéré Architecture, MOS, OFFICE KGDVS, and Sergison Bates—among others—have designed and constructed sixteen five meter-tall contemporary iterations of the renowned 1922 Chicago Tribune Tower design contest.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 56