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I.M. Pei’s Inspiration: A Comparison of Masterful Architecture with Minimalist Art

09:30 - 26 April, 2017
I.M. Pei’s Inspiration: A Comparison of Masterful Architecture with Minimalist Art, I.M. Pei's JFK Presidential Library and Museum in Massachusetts. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/masstravel/8568079947'>Flickr user masstravel</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-ND 2.0</a>
I.M. Pei's JFK Presidential Library and Museum in Massachusetts. Image © Flickr user masstravel licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0

Today, April 26th 2017, marks I.M. Pei’s 100th birthday. The occasion offers a wonderful opportunity to take a retrospective look at one of the most significant and productive architects of the past 100 years, with many organizations hosting events, celebrations, and symposiums to talk about Master Pei and his notable projects. However at these events, just as throughout I.M. Pei’s career, there is unlikely to be much intellectual conversation about Pei’s architectural legacy. The main discussion around I.M. Pei is still focused on his design talent and intriguing narratives about the charisma he used to convince clients to continue through tough projects.

Though I.M. Pei himself has never talked at length about his design theory or the intellectual basis of his projects, these simple narratives leave certain questions unanswered: Where does I.M. Pei’s inspiration for architectural form come from? How did his architectural design affect his peer group of architects and artists, and contribute intellectually to the contemporary art world?

Korean Curiosity: Is Seoul Experiencing a "Neo-Brutalist Revival"?

09:30 - 25 April, 2017
© Raphael Olivier
© Raphael Olivier

During his frequent travels to Seoul, Hong Kong- and Singapore-based photographer Raphael Olivier noticed a new trend taking the South Korean capital: a crop of geometric, concrete buildings of all genres. He calls the new style Neo-Brutalism, after the modernist movement that proliferated in the late 1950s to 1970s, in which raw concrete was meant to express a truth and honesty. Olivier's observation led him to capture the phenomenon in a personal photo series—a photographic treasure trove of these projects which, when taken as a whole, uncovers a cross-section of this trend in the city's architecture.

© Raphael Olivier © Raphael Olivier © Raphael Olivier © Raphael Olivier +19

UK's First "Naked House" Proposal Aims to Bring Affordability to London's Housing Market

12:45 - 24 April, 2017
Elevation. Image Courtesy of OMMX
Elevation. Image Courtesy of OMMX

The average cost of a home in London has now reached over £500,000 ($640,000), a figure far beyond the reach of the large majority of individuals or families on or below the average UK income (£34,473, or just under $45,000, per year). It’s a story which has been told time and again in recent years; the “housing crisis” of affordability continues to exacerbate the lives of a generation.

For Naked House, a not-for-profit organization dedicated to “stripping affordable housing back to the bare essentials,” crisis necessitates a creative response. With support and funding from the GLA (Greater London Authority) and the incumbent Mayor of London, who has awarded a £500,000 grant to the development, they—in collaboration with OMMX—have now made an important step closer to realizing their vision.

Site model. Image Courtesy of OMMX Interior space. Image Courtesy of OMMX Sectional model. Image Courtesy of OMMX Perspective based on the urban typology of a "Mews". Image Courtesy of OMMX +5

How to Name Your Architecture Practice to Improve Your Chances of Success

09:30 - 24 April, 2017

The single most important thing that an architecture firm can do to become successful is to create good architecture. Unfortunately, there are many other considerations to business success, especially in our current world that is driven by PR and marketing. For every architecture firm’s founder, one of the first—and biggest—decisions they must make about their public profile is what to call the company.

Gone are the days when architects would simply name their firm after themselves and sell their designs to their cocktail party associates. Today, architects need to court new clients in a competitive marketplace, and to do that they need a name that stands out. To help new firm owners (and long-term dreamers) to pick out an effective name and return to the important business of architecture, here is ArchDaily’s list of things to consider when naming your firm.

Finding Love in the Sand: The Instinctive Architecture of the Pufferfish

09:30 - 23 April, 2017

How much effort are you willing to put in to attract that special someone? The humble Japanese pufferfish, just twelve centimeters long when un-puffed, almost certainly has you beat. To attract the best fish in the sea, male pufferfish spend at least seven 24-hour days completing an intricate mating ritual that involves swimming their bodies into and through the seafloor to form ridges and trenches in the sand. If they pause too early, the entire ordeal gets washed away by currents.

A Glimpse of the Forward-Thinking, Humorous Work of Cedric Price

09:30 - 22 April, 2017
A Glimpse of the Forward-Thinking, Humorous Work of Cedric Price, Cedric Price's "Potteries Thinkbelt" project. Image Courtesy of Canadian Centre for Architecture
Cedric Price's "Potteries Thinkbelt" project. Image Courtesy of Canadian Centre for Architecture

Samantha Hardingham's recently-published work, A Forward-Minded Retrospective: Cedric Price Works—1953-2003, traces the architect's career through a comprehensive collection of his drawings and renders. The exhaustive two-volume work acknowledges Cedric Price not just as the entertaining novelty he is often regarded as, but as a great mind who was ahead of his time. While the vast majority of work produced during his lifetime was never built, Hardingham draws out the radical genius behind such projects as the hybrid office complex-highway "Officebar," a zoo restaurant whose column-less interior paved the way for its later conversion to a giraffe habitat, and many others—built and unbuilt.

In addition to the uncanny future forecasting expressed in many of Price's works, they are also known for serving as inspiration for the functionalist designs of Renzo Piano and Richard Rogers, making them necessary to a complete understanding of the modern architectural canon. In an article on Metropolis Magazine, Samuel Medina takes a whistle-stop tour of some of the most intriguing works presented in Hardingham's new book.

7 Ways Architects Can Work Toward Carbon Neutral Buildings by 2030

09:30 - 21 April, 2017
7 Ways Architects Can Work Toward Carbon Neutral Buildings by 2030, Image composite by Micke Tong
Image composite by Micke Tong

This article was originally published on Autodesk's Redshift publication as "7 Tactics for Meeting the Architecture 2030 Challenge and Beyond."

As the impacts of global climate change escalate, forward-thinking architecture firms have committed to being part of the solution. Increasingly, these firms are signing on to the 2030 Challenge and American Institute of Architects’ supporting initiative, AIA 2030 Commitment, which provide a framework to reduce fossil-fuel dependence and make all buildings, developments, and major renovations carbon neutral by 2030.

The 2030 Challenge has been adopted by 80 percent of the top 10 and 65 percent of the top 20 architecture, engineering, and planning firms in the United States, as well as many state and local government agencies. Among these are Eskew+Dumez+Ripple (EDR), a New Orleans–based architecture and planning firm; HOK, a global design, architecture, engineering, and planning firm; and CTA Architects Engineers, an integrated design, engineering, and architecture firm with offices throughout the Western United States and Canada. Here, five professionals from EDR, HOK, and CTA share seven key tactics they’ve employed to move toward the 2030 target—and a sustainable future for the planet.

As Roads Become High-Tech, Historic Toll Booths Might Need to Be Saved

09:30 - 20 April, 2017
As Roads Become High-Tech, Historic Toll Booths Might Need to Be Saved, Tollbooth in New Harmony, Indiana. Image via <a href='http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/highsm.04189/'>Library of Congress/LC-DIG-HIGHSM-04189</a>
Tollbooth in New Harmony, Indiana. Image via Library of Congress/LC-DIG-HIGHSM-04189

This article was originally published on Atlas Obscura as "The Case for Preserving the 20th Century Tollbooth."

Massachusetts is destroying its toll plazas. By the end of this year, every single one on the Massachusetts Turnpike will have been demolished. Drivers will still pay to use the road—they will zoom through the metal arches of electronic tolling infrastructure—but the routine of slowing down, stopping to grab a ticket, and waiting for the barrier to rise will be gone.

Massachusetts is being more aggressive than most places about sweeping away its old tolling infrastructure, but all across the country, from New York to FloridaTexas to California, road authorities are switching to all-electronic tolling. While it’s too soon to declare the tollbooth dead, it’s easy to imagine a future in which roads are unencumbered by boxy plazas and simple gates.

30 Sites Every Architect Should Visit in Mexico City

08:00 - 20 April, 2017
30 Sites Every Architect Should Visit in Mexico City , via Flickr user: © Kasper Christensen, bajo licencia CC BY-SA 2.0
via Flickr user: © Kasper Christensen, bajo licencia CC BY-SA 2.0

Though the idea of a vacation in Mexico usually brings to mind images of margaritas on white-sand beaches, it seems the country is slowly but surely gaining recognition in other aspects as well. Among the most populated urban cities in Latin America and the world – not to mention The New York Times' number one "Place to Go in 2016" – Mexico City offers a particular cultural diversity evident both in its traditions and in its architecture. Considering it's the main tourist, educational, cultural, economic and political center of Mexico, it makes sense that it's the perfect scenario for the social encounters of its multicultural inhabitants and tourists.

The sites of architectural interest alone are worth the visit, with prehispanic, classic, modern and contemporary examples ranging from Juan O'Gorman and Luis Barragán to Felix Candela and David Chipperfield. Add to that the fact that its gastronomic scene has garnered much praise and attention in recent years, and you've got a perfect combo. Below is a carefully curated list of 30 sites that every architect should know and visit.

Éric Lapierre Appointed as Chief Curator of 2019 Lisbon Architecture Triennale

13:30 - 19 April, 2017
Éric Lapierre Appointed as Chief Curator of 2019 Lisbon Architecture Triennale, The Palace of Sinel de Cordes in Lisbon (headquarters of the Triennale). Image © Abinadi Meza
The Palace of Sinel de Cordes in Lisbon (headquarters of the Triennale). Image © Abinadi Meza

The Trienal de Lisboa have today announced that a team of nine, led by Parisian architect Éric Lapierre, has been appointed as the curatorial team of the 5th edition of Lisbon Architecture Triennale which will be held from October to December 2019. Lapierre, who runs the Masters in Architecture & Experience at the École Nationale Supérieure d’Architecture in Marne-la-Vallée, Paris, will collaborate with philosopher Sébastien Marot, who is also a critic in architecture and landscape design. Other members of the curatorial team include Ambra Fabi, Giovanni Piovene, Mariabruna Fabrizi, Fosco Lucarelli, Laurent Esmilaire, Tristan Chadney, and Vasco Pinelo de Melo. A grand total of 48 proposals were submitted to the organization, comprising 155 participants from 16 countries.

What Will Thomas Heatherwick's "Vessel" At Hudson Yards Really Add to New York?

09:30 - 19 April, 2017
What Will Thomas Heatherwick's "Vessel" At Hudson Yards Really Add to New York?, The 150-foot-tall steel structure has been compared to a bedbug, a beehive, and a döner kebab. Its base is 50 feet wide and its upper span measures 150 feet. Image Courtesy of Forbes Massie, Heatherwick Studio
The 150-foot-tall steel structure has been compared to a bedbug, a beehive, and a döner kebab. Its base is 50 feet wide and its upper span measures 150 feet. Image Courtesy of Forbes Massie, Heatherwick Studio

This article was originally published by The Architect's Newspaper as "What do New Yorkers get when privately-funded public art goes big?"

When Thomas Heatherwick—the nimble London-based designer known for work that defies easy categorization—unveiled his design for a new public landmark called Vessel at Hudson Yards to a crowd of reporters and New York City power players in September, questions abounded. What is it? What will it do to the neighborhood? And what does it say that Stephen Ross, the president and CEO of Related Companies, the primary developer of Hudson Yards, is financing the entire $250 million piece by himself?

It’s natural that Ross chose Heatherwick Studio to design his centerpiece, because the office’s creations stun. For the UK Pavilion at the 2010 Shanghai Expo, it extruded 60,000 clear acrylic tubes from a center space to create a fuzzy, crystalline object whose apparent fragility is as mesmerizing as it is clever. As the studio moves toward ever-larger and ever-more-public commissions, the people who will live with its work will need to seriously consider what it will mean for their neighborhoods and cities.

18 Cool Examples of Architecture for Kids

06:00 - 19 April, 2017

Designing for kids is certainly not child’s play. Whilst the design process is undertaken by adults, the end users are often children, such is the case in kindergarten, schools, and parks. Architects have a responsibility, therefore, to ensure that the built environment offers children the chance to play, explore, and learn in physical space, even in a digital age. With that in mind, here are 18 cool spaces designed especially for children – environments which may perhaps inspire the Fosters, Hadids, and Le Corbusiers of tomorrow.

Architecture Takes Center Stage With Google Earth Relaunch

10:00 - 18 April, 2017

Google Earth is no longer a clunky, data-intensive desktop or mobile application. As of today, one of the tech-giant's flagship (and unrivalled) products has been relaunched as a widely accessible web application for Google Chrome. This means that anyone can now access the full Google Earth product, free of charge, without having to install software or download mobile applications.

The Website Behind the "Post-Digital" Drawing Revolution

09:30 - 18 April, 2017
The Website Behind the "Post-Digital" Drawing Revolution, Depicting Spaces. Image Courtesy of Tom Grillo
Depicting Spaces. Image Courtesy of Tom Grillo

This article was originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "Inside The Digital Platform Championing Post-Digital Drawing."

Digital technologies were supposed to kill the drawing. And in an obvious way they did, with CAD displacing hand draughtsmanship long ago. But drawing is more than mere delineation—measured construction drawings—or even the rendering, which has devolved into a mere marketing tool. Indeed, as Sam Jacob writes, it constitutes a fundamental “architectural act” that lies at the core of the discipline’s self-understanding.

Jacob describes a new “post-digital” mode of drawing that incorporates narrative cues, art historical allusions, and software-enabled collage techniques. It recalls Mies’s sparse one-point perspectives and de Chirico’s metaphysical paintings as well as the affected irreverence of Postmodernism. It’s a style popularized by blogs such as KoozA/rch, which was founded by architect Federica Sofia Zambeletti three years ago. We spoke to Zambeletti about the resurgence of architectural drawing and how the style could soon exhaust itself.

This sketch by the architect and noted yacht designer Lujac Desautel attempts a synthesis of Miesian space and David Hockney’s representational style. The drawing, along with many others of its type, was featured on KooZA/rch, a popular blog curated by designer Federica Sofia Zambeletti. Image Courtesy of Lujac Desautel / KOOZA:RCH Built In A Day, Creating Narratives of Horizontality Based On A Speculative Fiction. Image Courtesy of David Verbeek Mixed Realism Meets Flatness and Symbolism. Image Courtesy of Nowadays Office Evoking Memories, An architecture of Desire. Image Courtesy of Gustav Düsing & Max Hacke / KooZA/rch +14

Look Inside a Collection of Seoul-Based Architecture Offices, Photographed by Marc Goodwin and Felix Nybergh

04:00 - 18 April, 2017
Look Inside a Collection of Seoul-Based Architecture Offices, Photographed by Marc Goodwin and Felix Nybergh, UnSangDong Architects. Image © Marc Goodwin / Felix Nybergh
UnSangDong Architects. Image © Marc Goodwin / Felix Nybergh

Architectural photographer Marc Goodwin, in cooperation with Felix Nybergh, has recently completed the fourth collection of his "ultra-marathon of photoshoots" – this time in Seoul. Following Goodwin's unique insight into the spaces occupied by Nordic architectural offices (based in Oslo, Stockholm, Copenhagen and Helsinki), his look at studios both large and small lived in by London-based practices, and his lens on a collection of Beijing-based studios, he and Nybergh have now turned their attention to the rich architectural scene of the South Korean capital.

Moonbalsso. Image © Marc Goodwin / Felix Nybergh Hyunjoon Yoo Architects. Image © Marc Goodwin / Felix Nybergh IROJE architects & planners. Image © Marc Goodwin / Felix Nybergh designcamp moonpark dmp. Image © Marc Goodwin / Felix Nybergh +30

AIA Pushes for Elimination of “Intern” Title for Young Architects

14:10 - 17 April, 2017
AIA Pushes for Elimination of “Intern” Title for Young Architects, © Jim Richards
© Jim Richards

For recent architecture school graduates setting off on their careers for the first time, being referred to by the traditional title of “intern” can feel a little trivializing – as a full-time employee with a completed degree and real responsibilities, the title does little to capture a new hire’s true role within the firm.

Cognizant of this discrepancy, the AIA is now taking steps to eliminate the use of ‘intern,’ a term grandfathered in from the days of architectural apprenticeships and more linear paths through the architectural profession.

How to Pronounce the Names of 22 Notable Architects

09:30 - 17 April, 2017
How to Pronounce the Names of 22 Notable Architects

There’s no doubt that one of the best things about architecture is its universality. Wherever you come from, whatever you do, however you speak, architecture has somehow touched your life. However, when one unexpectedly has to pronounce a foreign architect’s name... things can get a little tricky. This is especially the case when mispronunciation could end up making you look less knowledgeable than you really are. (If you're really unlucky, it could end up making you look stupid in front of your children and the whole world.)

To help you out, we’ve compiled a list of 22 architects with names that are a little difficult to pronounce, and paired them with a recording in which their names are said impeccably. Listen and repeat as many times as it takes to get it right, and you’ll be prepared for any intellectual architectural conversation that comes your way. 

Should Airbnb Help Save This High-Tech Gem?

09:30 - 14 April, 2017
Should Airbnb Help Save This High-Tech Gem?, The Columbus Occupational Health Association could be an ideal candidate for a partnership between Airbnb and Columbus, Indiana. Image Courtesy of H3
The Columbus Occupational Health Association could be an ideal candidate for a partnership between Airbnb and Columbus, Indiana. Image Courtesy of H3

This article was originally published by The Architect's Newspaper as "Why Airbnb should help save an architectural icon."

If I had to guess, I would say that it has been forty years since Columbus, Indiana, was the hot topic of cocktail conversations at design-related get-togethers in New York City. In those days, it was the supercharged patronage of industrialist J. Irwin Miller and his relationships with designers like Eero Saarinen and Alexander Girard that spurred a wave of innovative and provocative architecture in the small Midwestern town. Columbus, with a population of 45,000, has a Robert Venturi fire station, a John Johansen school, a park by Michael Van Valkenburgh, and several buildings by Eliel and Eero Saarinen, including the younger’s iconic Miller House.