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Spotlight

Spotlight: Zaha Hadid

07:45 - 31 October, 2018
Spotlight: Zaha Hadid, Heydar Aliyev Center. Image © Hufton+Crow
Heydar Aliyev Center. Image © Hufton+Crow

In her lifetime, Pritzker prize-winning architect, fashion designer and artist Zaha Hadid (31 October 1950 – 31 March 2016) became one of the most recognizable faces of our field. Revered and denounced in equal measure for the sensuous curved forms for which she was known, Hadid rose to prominence not solely through parametricism but by designing spaces to occupy geometries in new ways. Despite her tragically early death in March of 2016, the projects now being completed by her office without their original lead designer continue to push boundaries both creative and technological, while the fearless media presence she cultivated in recent decades has cemented her place in society as a woman who needs just one name: Zaha.

Heydar Aliyev Center. Image © Hufton+Crow Vitra Fire Station. Image © Wojtek Gurak Bergisel Ski Jump. Image © Hélène Binet Antwerp Port House. Image © Hélène Binet + 36

Spotlight: SANAA

15:00 - 29 October, 2018
Spotlight: SANAA, Grace Farms / SANAA. Image © Dean Kaufman
Grace Farms / SANAA. Image © Dean Kaufman

Founded in 1995 by architects Kazuyo Sejima (born 29 October 1956) and Ryue Nishizawa (born 7 February 1966), SANAA is world-renowned for its white, light buildings grounded in the architects’ Japanese cultural origins. Despite the white exteriors, their architecture is far from modernist; the constant incorporation of ambiguity and doubt in SANAA’s buildings is refreshing and playful, taking the reflective properties of glass and brightness of white to a new level.

Grace Farms / SANAA. Image © Dean Kaufman Louvre Lens / SANAA. Image © Julien Lanoo Glass Pavilion at the Toledo Museum of Art / SANAA. Image © Iwan Baan New Museum / SANAA. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 12

Spotlight: Paulo Mendes da Rocha

13:30 - 25 October, 2018
Spotlight: Paulo Mendes da Rocha, Museu Brasileiro de Escultura (MuBE). Image © Paul Clemence
Museu Brasileiro de Escultura (MuBE). Image © Paul Clemence

All space must be attached to a value, to a public dimension. There is no private space. The only private space that you can imagine is the human mind.
Paulo Mendes da Rocha, May 26, 2004

Paulo Mendes da Rocha is one of Brazil's greatest architects and urbanists. Born in Vitória, Espírito Santo in 1928, Mendes da Rocha won the 2006 Pritzker Prize, and is one of the most representative architects of the Brazilian Paulista School, also known as "Paulista Brutalism" that utilizes more geometric lines, rougher finishes and bulkier massing than other Brazilian Modernists such as Oscar Niemeyer.

Museu Brasileiro de Escultura (MuBE). Image © Paul Clemence New Leme Gallery. Image © Leonardo Finotti Cais das Artes. Image Courtesy of Paulo Mendes da Rocha Museu dos Coches. Image © Fernando Guerra |  FG+SG + 13

Spotlight: Paul Rudolph

15:00 - 23 October, 2018
University of Massachusetts campus in Dartmouth. Image Courtesy of UMass Dartmouth
University of Massachusetts campus in Dartmouth. Image Courtesy of UMass Dartmouth

One of the United States' leading architects of the Modernist era, Paul Marvin Rudolph (October 23, 1918 – August 8, 1997) was known for his contributions to modernism throughout the latter half of the 20th century. He served as the Chair of Yale University’s School of Architecture for six years and famously designed the Yale Art and Architecture Building, one of the earliest examples of Brutalist architecture in the United States.

University of Massachusetts campus in Dartmouth. Image Courtesy of UMass Dartmouth Milam Residence. Image © Casacara The Colonnade Condominiums. Image © Cooney-Hughes Orange County Government Center. Image © Matthew Carbone for Architect Magazine + 10

Spotlight: Peter Cook

15:00 - 22 October, 2018
Spotlight: Peter Cook, BIX Communicative Display Skin for the Kunsthaus Graz, 2003; View from Schlossberg. Image © Harry Schiffer / realities:united
BIX Communicative Display Skin for the Kunsthaus Graz, 2003; View from Schlossberg. Image © Harry Schiffer / realities:united

As one of the founding members of Archigram, the avant-garde neo-futurist architecture group of the 1960s, the British architect, professor, and writer Sir Peter Cook (born 22 October 1936) has been a pivotal figure within the global architectural world for over half a century; one of his most significant works from his time with Archigram, The Plug-In City, still invokes debates on technology and society, challenging standards of architectural discourse today.

Plug-In City. Image © Peter Cook via the <a href='http://archigram.westminster.ac.uk/'>Archigram Archival Project</a> Abedian School of Architecture / CRAB Studio. Image © Peter Bennetts Departments Of Law And Central Administration / CRAB Studio. Image © Ronald Kreimel CLT Innovation Center for the Arts University Bournemouth / CRAB Studio. Image Courtesy of CRAB Studio + 25

Spotlight: Sir Christopher Wren

04:00 - 20 October, 2018
Spotlight: Sir Christopher Wren, Old Royal Navy College, Greenwich. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/nickschooley/6758847925'>Flickr user nickschooley</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a>
Old Royal Navy College, Greenwich. Image © Flickr user nickschooley licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

Sir Christopher Wren (20 October 1632 – 25 February 1723) is one the most significant architects in British history, and was a recognized astronomer, scholar, and physicist-mathematician. Wren was classically trained at the University of Oxford in physics and engineering where he developed his interest in architecture. He is perhaps most famous for designing London's iconic St Paul's Cathedral, however he is credited with the design of dozens of other churches, government buildings, and hospitals in England. Wren was knighted in 1673.

Spotlight: Alejandro Zaera-Polo

02:30 - 17 October, 2018
Spotlight: Alejandro Zaera-Polo, Birmingham New Street Station. Image © Javier Callejas
Birmingham New Street Station. Image © Javier Callejas

Alejandro Zaera-Polo (born October 17th 1963) is an internationally recognized architect and scholar, and founder of London, Zurich, and Princeton-based firm Alejandro Zaera-Polo & Maider Llaguno Architecture (AZPML). First rising to prominence in the 1980s with his writings for publications such as El Croquis, Zaera-Polo has had a prolific career in both the academic and professional realms of architecture.

Spotlight: Le Corbusier

05:30 - 6 October, 2018
Spotlight: Le Corbusier, Notre Dame du Haut at Ronchamp. Image © <a href='www.flickr.com/photos/9160678@N06/2089042156'>Flickr user scarletgreen</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
Notre Dame du Haut at Ronchamp. Image © Flickr user scarletgreen licensed under CC BY 2.0

Born in the small Swiss city of La Chaux-de-Fonds, Charles-Édouard Jeanneret-Gris—better known by his pseudonym Le Corbusier (October 6, 1887 – August 27, 1965)—is widely regarded as the most important architect of the 20th century. As a gifted architect, provocative writer, divisive urban planner, talented painter, and unparalleled polemicist, Le Corbusier was able to influence some of the world’s most powerful figures, leaving an indelible mark on architecture that can be seen in almost any city worldwide.

Palace of the Assembly at Chandigarh. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/70608042@N00/1321525329'>Flickr user chiara_facchetti</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> Villa Savoye. Image © Flavio Bragaia Church at Firminy. Image © Richard Weil Swiss Pavilion. Image © Samuel Ludwig + 25

Spotlight: Maya Lin

16:30 - 5 October, 2018
Spotlight: Maya Lin, Vietnam Veterans Memorial. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/derekskey/5249593792'>Flickr user derekskey</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
Vietnam Veterans Memorial. Image © Flickr user derekskey licensed under CC BY 2.0

At the age of just 21 and while she was still finishing her undergraduate degree at Yale, Maya Lin (born October 5, 1959) won the design competition for the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington DC. The memorial went on to become among the most recognizable designs in the world, and heralded a sea change for memorial design, breaking with classical conventions and dramatically changing the discourse of a typology.

Competition Entry to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial competition. Image <a href='http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/97505164/'>via Library of Congress</a>, released to public domain by Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund Apex of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, Beginning & End of Chronology. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/frank_steele/3424813809'>Flickr user frank_steele</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-ND 2.0</a> Vietnam Veterans Memorial. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/kenlund/2716164844'>Flickr user kenlund</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> Vietnam Veterans Memorial. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/timevanson/8017951874'>Flickr user Tim Evanson</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> + 8

Spotlight: Bjarke Ingels

13:05 - 2 October, 2018
Spotlight: Bjarke Ingels, Lego House. Image Courtesy of LEGO Group
Lego House. Image Courtesy of LEGO Group

Danish architect Bjarke Ingels (born 2 October 1974) is often cited as one of the most inspirational architects of our time. At an age when many architects are just beginning to establish themselves in professional practice, Ingels has already won numerous competitions and achieved a level of critical acclaim (and fame) that is rare for new names in the industry. His work embodies a rare optimism that is simultaneously playful, practical, and immediately accessible.

Denmark Pavilion, Shanghai Expo 2010. Image © Iwan Baan VM Houses / BIG + JDS. Image Courtesy of BIG Danish National Maritime Museum. Image © Rasmus Hjortshõj 2016 Serpentine Pavilion. Image © Iwan Baan + 26

Spotlight: Renzo Piano

16:00 - 14 September, 2018
Spotlight: Renzo Piano, The Whitney Museum. Image © Nic Lehoux
The Whitney Museum. Image © Nic Lehoux

Architecture is art, but art vastly contaminated by many other things. Contaminated in the best sense of the word—fed, fertilized by many things.
– Renzo Piano

Italian architect Renzo Piano (born 14 September 1937) is known for his delicate and refined approach to building, deployed in museums and other buildings around the world. Awarded the Pritzker Prize in 1998, the Pritzker Jury compared him to Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, and Brunelleschi, highlighting "his intellectual curiosity and problem-solving techniques as broad and far ranging as those earlier masters of his native land."

Pathé Foundation. Image © Michel Denancé Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum. Image © Nic Lehoux Harvard Art Museums Renovation and Expansion. Image © Nic Lehoux Menil Collection. Image © D Jules Gianakos + 24

Spotlight: Tadao Ando

16:00 - 13 September, 2018
Spotlight: Tadao Ando, Church of the Light. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/hetgacom/22029029686'>Flickr user hetgacom</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a>
Church of the Light. Image © Flickr user hetgacom licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

As the recipient of the 1995 Pritzker Prize, Tadao Ando (born 13 September 1941) is highly regarded for his unparalleled work with concrete, sensitive treatment of natural light, and strong engagement with nature. Based in Osaka, Japan, Ando's ascetic yet rich version of modernism resonates with the traditional Japanese conception of architecture, and has caused him to be regularly referred to as a "critical regionalist."

Hyogo Prefectural Museum of Art. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hyogo_prefectural_museum_of_art08s3200.jpg'>Wikimedia user 663highland</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> The Langen Foundation. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Langen_Foundation_Neuss_02.jpg'>Wikimedia user Perlblau</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/de/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 2.0 DE</a> The Pulitzer Foundation. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Pulitzerfoundation.jpg'>Wikimedia user Garfield226</a> Licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> Church of the Light. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/hetgacom/22029029686'>Flickr user hetgacom</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> + 14

Spotlight: Louis Sullivan

16:00 - 3 September, 2018
 © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/chicagoarchitecturetoday/8400309871/'>Flickr user chicagoarchitecturetoday</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>. Image © Flickr user chicagoarchitecturetoday licensed under CC BY 2.0
© Flickr user chicagoarchitecturetoday licensed under CC BY 2.0. Image © Flickr user chicagoarchitecturetoday licensed under CC BY 2.0

Known as Chicago's "Father of Skyscrapers," Louis Sullivan (September 3, 1856 – April 14, 1924) foreshadowed modernism with his famous phrase "form follows function." Sullivan was an architectural prodigy even as a young man, graduating high school and beginning his studies at MIT when he was just 16. After just a year of study he dropped out of MIT, and by the time he was just 24 he had joined forces with Dankmar Adler as a full partner of Adler and Sullivan.

The Guaranty Building in Buffalo, New York. Image © Jack E. Boucher (public domain) The Carson Pirie Scott Building in Chicago, Illinois. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/cjsmithphotography/8656829487'>Flickr user cjsmithphotography</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-NC-SA 2.0</a> The Wainwright Building in St Louis, Missouri. Image © University of Missouri The Wainwright Building in St Louis, Missouri. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:2010-07-04_1880x2820_stlouis_wainwright_building.jpg'>J. Crocker</a> + 8

Spotlight: Sverre Fehn

16:00 - 14 August, 2018
Spotlight: Sverre Fehn, Nordic Pavilion in Venice. Image ©  Åke E:son Lindman
Nordic Pavilion in Venice. Image © Åke E:son Lindman

1997 Pritzker Prize laureate Sverre Fehn (August 14th 1924 – February 23rd 2009) was a leader in Post World War II Scandinavian architecture. “His work has an intuitive confidence in how to use the Nordic landscape and its particular light conditions within the built culture, and yet throughout his career each period has reflected a refined sensitivity to international changes and attitudes in architecture,” said his close collaborator Per Olaf Fjeld. “It can be compared to a poetic work conceived on an isolated mountain by a writer with an uncanny, intuitive sense of what is going on in the towns below.” [1]

Spotlight: Jean Nouvel

12:00 - 12 August, 2018
Spotlight: Jean Nouvel , © Iwan Baan
© Iwan Baan

The winner of the Wolf Prize in 2005 and the Pritzker of 2008, French architect Jean Nouvel has attempted to design each of his projects without any preconceived notions. The result is a variety of projects that, while strikingly different, always demonstrate a delicate play with light and shadow as well as a harmonious balance with their surroundings. It was this diverse approach that led the Pritzker Prize Jury in their citation to characterize Nouvel as primarily "courageous" in his "pursuit of new ideas and his challenge of accepted norms in order to stretch the boundaries of the field."

Institut du Monde Arabe. Image © Georges Fessy One Central Park. Image © Murray Fredericks Doha Office Tower, Qatar. Image © Nelson Garrido Police Headquearters & Charleroi Danses / Ateliers Jean Nouvel + MDW Architecture. Image © Filip Dujardin + 15

Spotlight: Joshua Prince-Ramus

16:00 - 11 August, 2018
Spotlight: Joshua Prince-Ramus, Vakko Headquarters and Power Media Center. Image © Iwan Baan
Vakko Headquarters and Power Media Center. Image © Iwan Baan

Joshua Prince-Ramus (born 11th August, 1969) has made a significant mark as one of the most promising young architects working today. Named one of the five greatest architects under 50 in 2011 by The Huffington Post, Prince-Ramus made a name for himself as one of Rem Koolhaas' many protégés before forming his practice, REX, in 2006.

Spotlight: Peter Eisenman

12:00 - 11 August, 2018
Spotlight: Peter Eisenman, Wexner Center for the Arts. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/75905404@N00/3484952969'>Flickr user OZinOH</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/'>CC BY-NC 2.0</a>
Wexner Center for the Arts. Image © Flickr user OZinOH licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

Whether built, written or drawn, the work of renowned architect, theorist and educator Peter Eisenman (born 11th August 1932) is characterized by Deconstructivism, with an interest in signs, symbols and the processes of making meaning always at the foreground. As such, Eisenman has been one of architecture's foremost theorists of recent decades; however he has also at times been a controversial figure in the architectural world, professing a disinterest in many of the more pragmatic concerns that other architects engage in.

The Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/dalbera/9617851018/'>Flickr user dalbera</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> House II. Image <a href='https://www.an-onymous.com/peter-eisenman/'>via an-onymous.com</a> The City of Culture. Image © Duccio Malagamba The Wexner Center. Image © Brad Feinknopf + 12

Spotlight: Kengo Kuma

08:00 - 8 August, 2018
Spotlight: Kengo Kuma, Asakusa Culture and Tourism Center. Image © Takeshi Yamagishi
Asakusa Culture and Tourism Center. Image © Takeshi Yamagishi

Kengo Kuma (born 8th August, 1956) is one of the most significant Japanese figures in contemporary architecture. His reinterpretation of traditional Japanese architectural elements for the 21st century has involved serious innovation in uses of natural materials, new ways of thinking about light and lightness and architecture that enhances rather than dominates. His buildings don't attempt to fade into the surroundings through simple gestures, as some current Japanese work does, but instead his architecture attempts to manipulate traditional elements into statement-making architecture that still draws links with the area in which it's built. These high-tech remixes of traditional elements and influences have proved popular across Japan and beyond, and his recent works have begun expanding out of Japan to China and the West.

Green Cast. Image Courtesy of kengo kuma & associates GC Prostho Museum Research Center. Image © Daici Ano Même – Experimental House. Image Courtesy of kengo kuma & associates Shun Shoku Lounge by Guranavi. Image Courtesy of kengo kuma & associates + 37