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Jersey City: The Latest Architecture and News

Park and Shore Apartments / Woods Bagot

© Chris Cooper© Chris Cooper© Chris Cooper© Chris Cooper+ 27

  • Architects: Woods Bagot
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  600000 ft²
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2019
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: Benjamin Moore, Blanco, Interface, Kohler, Stone Source, +13

Red Rock House / Anmahian Winton Architects

© Jane Messinger© Jane Messinger© Jane Messinger© Jane Messinger+ 24

Red Rock, United States

Spotlight: Raymond Hood

In a short but prodigious career Raymond Mathewson Hood (March 29, 1881 – August 14, 1934) had an outsized influence on twentieth century architecture. Born in Pawtucket, Rhode Island, Hood was the son of a box manufacturer in an affluent Baptist family.[1] He attended Brown University before studying at MIT School of Architecture, later graduating from the École des Beaux-Arts in 1911. While in Paris, Hood met John Mead Howells, who in 1922 would select him as a partner for the design of the Chicago Tribune Tower. The team would beat out many more avant-garde entries by the likes of Walter Gropius, Adolf Loos, and Eliel Saarinen, with their own Neo-Gothic edifice that mimicked the Butter Tower of Rouen Cathedral.

10 Things You Didn't Know About Modern Icon Pierre Chareau

Known for his collaboration on the legendary Maison de Verre, French architect, and interior designer Pierre Chareau is a celebrated artist cited by Richard Rogers, Jean Nouvel, and more as a major influence on their work.

Completed in 1932, Maison de Verre—or “House of Glass”—has become a prime example of modern architecture, despite the fact that not many people have actually seen the hidden treasure, located on Paris’ Left Bank.

Although his work is currently viewed in high regard, Chareau had a tumultuous career, with large variances between his successes and his failures.

Drawing from a Cultured Magazine spotlight article on the designer, we have compiled a list of facts about Chareau’s life and career that showcase the rollercoaster of his success.

Continue reading for the 10 things you didn’t know about Pierre Chareau.

Managed By Q Headquarters / Studio A+H

© Eduard Hueber / archphoto© Eduard Hueber / archphoto© Eduard Hueber / archphoto© Eduard Hueber / archphoto+ 31

  • Architects: Studio A+H
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  30000 ft²
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2017
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: A+L Lighting, Acoustical Solutions, Blinds.com, Curran Floor

Wentworth House 2 / MHN Design Union

© Brett Boardman Photography
© Brett Boardman Photography

© Brett Boardman Photography© Brett Boardman Photography© Brett Boardman Photography© Brett Boardman Photography+ 20

Vaucluse, Australia
  • Architects: MHN Design Union
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  900
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2015
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: DECO Australia

485 Marin Residential Building / HWKN

© Frank Oudeman© Frank Oudeman© Frank Oudeman© Frank Oudeman+ 20

AD Classics: AT&T Building / Philip Johnson and John Burgee

It may be the single most important architectural detail of the last fifty years. Emerging bravely from the glassy sea of Madison Avenue skyscrapers in midtown Manhattan, the open pediment atop Philip Johnson and John Burgee’s 1984 AT&T Building (now the Sony Tower) singlehandedly turned the architectural world on its head. This playful deployment of historical quotation explicitly contradicted modernist imperatives and heralded the mainstream arrival of an approach to design defined instead by a search for architectural meaning. The AT&T Building wasn’t the first of its type, but it was certainly the most high-profile, proudly announcing that architecture was experiencing the maturation of a new evolutionary phase: Postmodernism had officially arrived to the world scene.

The Top 10 New Skyscrapers of 2018

1: Lotte World Tower / Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates with Baum Architects. Image © Tim Griffith
1: Lotte World Tower / Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates with Baum Architects. Image © Tim Griffith

Emporis has announced the results of its annual Emporis Skyscraper Award, recognizing the best new supertall buildings completed in the previous year. This year, the top prize was given to the Lotte World Tower in Seoul, South Korea, designed by Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates and Baum Architects. The tapered tower, South Korea’s tallest, also houses the world’s highest glass-bottomed observation deck, for architects who can handle the 1820-foot (555-meter) drop.

AD Classics: Citigroup Center / Hugh Stubbins + William Le Messurier

This article was originally published on November 5, 2014. To read the stories behind other celebrated architecture projects, visit our AD Classics section.

In a city of skyscrapers of nearly every shape and size, the Citigroup Center on Lexington Avenue is one of New York’s most unique. Resting on four stilts perfectly centered on each side, it cantilevers seventy-two feet over the sidewalk and features a trademark 45-degree sloping crown at its summit. The original structure responsible for these striking features also contained a grave oversight that nearly resulted in structural catastrophe, giving the tower the moniker of “the greatest disaster never told” when the story finally was told in 1995. The incredible tale—now legendary among structural engineers—adds a fascinating back-story to one of the most iconic fixtures of the Manhattan skyline.

© Flickr user Steven Severing-Haus© Flickr user paulkhor© Flickr user Jeff Stvan© Flickr user Axel Drainville+ 10

COOKFOX Studio / COOKFOX Architects

© Eric Laignel© Eric Laignel© Eric Laignel© Eric Laignel+ 11

AD Classics: Austrian Cultural Forum / Raimund Abraham

This article was originally published on May 25, 2015. To read the stories behind other celebrated architecture projects, visit our AD Classics section.

Before the impossibly “super-thin” tower became ubiquitous on the Midtown Manhattan skyline, Raimund Abraham’s Austrian Cultural Forum challenged the limits of what could be built on the slenderest of urban lots. Working with a footprint no bigger than a townhouse (indeed, one occupied the site before the present tower), Abraham erected a daring twenty-four story high-rise only twenty-five feet across. Instantly recognizable by its profile, a symmetrical, blade-like curtain wall cascading violently toward the sidewalk, ACFNY was heralded by Kenneth Frampton as “the most significant modern piece of architecture to be realized in Manhattan since the Seagram Building and the Guggenheim Museum of 1959.” [1]

The massing of the building is dictated solely by zoning laws and the immediacy of its neighbors. Image © Photo by David Plakke, davidplakke.com; Courtesy of Austrian Cultural Forum New York© Photo by David Plakke, davidplakke.com; Courtesy of Austrian Cultural Forum New YorkThe director's office that occupies the box-like protrusion on the southern facade. Image © Photo by David Plakke, davidplakke.com; Courtesy of Austrian Cultural Forum New YorkEast-facing section with the "scissor stairs" on the left-hand side+ 7

AD Classics: TWA Flight Center / Eero Saarinen

This article was originally published on June 16, 2016. To read the stories behind other celebrated architecture projects, visit our AD Classics section.

Built in the early days of airline travel, the TWA Terminal is a concrete symbol of the rapid technological transformations which were fueled by the outset of the Second World War. Eero Saarinen sought to capture the sensation of flight in all aspects of the building, from a fluid and open interior, to the wing-like concrete shell of the roof. At TWA’s behest, Saarinen designed more than a functional terminal; he designed a monument to the airline and to aviation itself.

This AD Classic features a series of exclusive images by Cameron Blaylock, photographed in May 2016. Blaylock used a Contax camera and Zeiss lenses with Rollei black and white film to reflect camera technology of the 1960s.

© Cameron Blaylock© Cameron Blaylock© Cameron Blaylock© Cameron Blaylock+ 26

AD Classics: Empire State Building / Shreve, Lamb and Harmon

This article was originally published on December 5, 2016. To read the stories behind other celebrated architecture projects, visit our AD Classics section.

Even in Manhattan—a sea of skyscrapers—the Empire State Building towers over its neighbours. Since its completion in 1931 it has been one of the most iconic architectural landmarks in the United States, standing as the tallest structure in the world until the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center were constructed in Downtown Manhattan four decades later. Its construction in the early years of the Great Depression, employing thousands of workers and requiring vast material resources, was driven by more than commercial interest: the Empire State Building was to be a monument to the audacity of the United States of America, “a land which reached for the sky with its feet on the ground.”[1]

Image via Wikimedia (Public Domain). ImageLaying of the tower's foundationsThe pinnacle of the tower. Image © Wikimedia user David Corby (licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0)Image via Wikimedia (Public Domain). ImageUnder constructionImage via Wikimedia (Public Domain). ImageUnder construction+ 6

AD Classics: Pennsylvania Station / McKim, Mead & White

This article was originally published on February 11, 2014. To read the stories behind other celebrated architecture projects, visit our AD Classics section.

New York City’s original Pennsylvania Station was a monument to movement and an expression of American economic power. In 1902, the noted firm McKim, Mead and White was selected by the President of the Pennsylvania Railroad to design its Manhattan terminal. Completed in 1910, the gigantic steel and stone building covered four city blocks until its demolition in 1963, when it ceded to economic strains hardly fifty years after opening.

© wikimedia commonsTrack level and concourses. Image © Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Detroit Publishing Company CollectionConcourse from South, 1962. Image © Cervin Robinson - Historic American Buildings SurveyFacade from Northeast. Image © Cervin Robinson - Historic American Buildings Survey+ 40

Rose Center for Earth and Space / Polshek Partnership (Ennead Architects)

© Richard-Barnes© Jeff-Goldberg© Jeff-Goldberg© Jeff-Goldberg+ 8

New York, United States

adidas NYC / Gensler

© Dirk Tacke, Courtesy of adidas© Dirk Tacke, Courtesy of adidas© Dirk Tacke, Courtesy of adidas© Dirk Tacke, Courtesy of adidas+ 13

New York, United States

150 Charles / Dirtworks Landscape Architecture

© Mark Weinberg© Mark Weinberg© Mark Weinberg© Mark Weinberg+ 15