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6 Modern Building Types That Will Soon Disappear Forever

09:30 - 4 July, 2018
Corner Shop (2000). Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/8431398@N04/2535026759'>Flickr user Andrea_44</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
Corner Shop (2000). Image © Flickr user Andrea_44 licensed under CC BY 2.0

Architecture is often seen as something which provides a place-marker in history, reflecting the zeitgeist of an era. But how do we design architecture in a world that is changing faster than ever before, where entire types of buildings disappear seemingly in a flash? Here, we round up six types of buildings that came into existence in modern times and are fading as fast as they appeared. Mostly banal and previously ubiquitous, the nostalgia associated with the disappearance of these buildings taps into something emotional, rather than intellectual admiration.

Memory and architecture are closely linked, with Juhani Pallasmaa in his book The Eyes of the Skin describing how “the body knows and remembers. Architectural meaning derives from archaic responses and reactions remembered by the body and the senses.” Some of the structures below have become obsolete within half a lifespan—an interesting point to consider in a discipline that has historically valued permanence above all. If structures no longer serve a social function, will they be remembered?

Milk Bar, West Footscray, Australia. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/spin_spin/97439414'>Flickr user Susan Fitzgerald</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-ND 2.0</a> UK Phone Booth . Image via Pixabay Closing down sale at Blockbuster Video, Bank Street, Galashiels. Image © <a href='https://www.geograph.org.uk/profile/6638'>Walter Baxter</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> Photobooth photos. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/simpleinsomnia/11980473896/in/album-72157637046542045/'>Flickr user simpleinsomnia </a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> + 11

50 Planning Terms & Concepts All Architects Should Know

09:30 - 28 June, 2018
50 Planning Terms & Concepts All Architects Should Know, Superkilen / Topotek 1 + BIG Architects + Superflex. Image © Iwan Baan
Superkilen / Topotek 1 + BIG Architects + Superflex. Image © Iwan Baan

As architects, we often use a niche set of words that are sometimes unnecessarily complex and confusing to our non-architect friends. In 2015 we compiled a list of these, ranging from “typology” to “Blobitecture.” Here we’ve rounded up 50 urban planning terms that might be a bit less familiar but just as important to know. 

From weird portmanteaus such as “Boomburb” to cute-sounding acronyms such as "YIMBY", here is a fun A to Z in urban planning language that will make future collaboration easier. 

Water and Wellbeing: Projects that Explore the Potential of Public Baths and Pools

06:00 - 20 June, 2018
Water and Wellbeing: Projects that Explore the Potential of Public Baths and Pools, © Jaime Navarro
© Jaime Navarro

There is something about water that continually captures our imagination. Tranquil, dramatic, or ever-changing, the architecture of public baths and swimming pools can enhance the inherent qualities of water. Bathhouses were traditionally meeting-spaces where social differences bled away into skin and steam. Even in contemporary architectural projects, spaces for swimming and bathing often feel like a separate world, therapeutic and intimate. 

Below are 12 projects that display stunning spaces for communal bathing and swimming.

© Jean Baptiste Dorner Courtesy of raumlaborberlin © Klemens Ortmeyer Courtesy of Álvarez cubells arquitectos + 12

Atelier Deshaus' Shanghai Modern Art Museum Through the Lens of Kris Provoost

16:00 - 16 June, 2018
© Kris Provoost
© Kris Provoost

Architect Kris Provoost, who lives and works in Shanghai, has captured Atelier Deshaus' new Shanghai Modern Art Museum through a series of photographs, displaying both the details of the building as well as its context on the Shanghai riverfront. The Shanghai Modern Art Museum is an adaptive re-use project on the old Laobaidu coal bunker, its industrial exterior kept and re-interpreted into a contemporary architectural project. Provoost captured the beautiful detailing of the project, as well as how it transforms during the cherry blossom season. 

© Kris Provoost © Kris Provoost © Kris Provoost © Kris Provoost + 25

This Cave-Like Luxury Apartment is Planned for Australia's Gold Coast

16:00 - 10 June, 2018
This Cave-Like Luxury Apartment is Planned for Australia's Gold Coast , Courtesy of Contreras Earl Architecture
Courtesy of Contreras Earl Architecture

Contreras Earl Architecture, in collaboration with the Sunland Group, designed a 44-story residential tower in Queensland, Australia. The "Hedges Pedestal," a two-story base and communal areas for residents, was conceived by Contreras Earl Architecture and draws inspiration from the coastal location of the site; its curving exterior façade, which includes a sculptural anodized aluminum, resembles the curves of wind erosion on the sand. Meanwhile, floors 3 through 44 were designed in-house by developer Sunland Group.

Courtesy of Contreras Earl Architecture Courtesy of Contreras Earl Architecture Courtesy of Contreras Earl Architecture Courtesy of Contreras Earl Architecture + 7

Sharjah Architecture Triennial to Open as First Major Platform on Middle Eastern Architecture

12:00 - 9 June, 2018
Sharjah Architecture Triennial to Open as First Major Platform on Middle Eastern Architecture, Central Market, King Faisal Street, Al Itihad Park, Sharjah. Image © Paul Gorra
Central Market, King Faisal Street, Al Itihad Park, Sharjah. Image © Paul Gorra

The Sharjah Architecture Triennial will open in November 2019 as "the first major platform for dialogue on architecture and urbanism in the Middle East, North Africa, East Africa and South Asia." Curator Adrian Lahoud has announced the theme of the Triennial as the Rights of Future Generations, aiming to fundamentally challenge traditional ideas about architecture and introduce new ways of thinking that veer from current Western-centric discourse.

Aerial view of Corniche Street and Al Mujarrah neighborhood. Image © Ieva Saudargaitė King Faisal Mosque, King Abdul Aziz Street, Sharjah, Office of Technical & Architectural Engineering & Consultancy, 1987.Aerial view of a Bank Street urban fragment. Image © Ieva Saudargaitė King Faisal Mosque, King Abdul Aziz Street, Sharjah, Office of Technical & Architectural Engineering & Consultancy, 1987. Image © Ieva Saudargaitė Street view of Bank Street buildings and Al Hisn Fort Museum, Sharjah. Image © Paul Gorra + 12

The World's First Pavilion-Scale Structure Built Using Augmented Reality

08:00 - 8 June, 2018

Fologram has recently built the world’s first pavilion-scale steel structure using the HoloLens, displaying the possibilities of integrating standard CAD workflow with augmented reality. By displaying the generative design model through holographic instructions rather than traditional 2D drawings, it explores the potential of revolutionizing the bridge between design and construction.

Courtesy of Fologram Courtesy of Fologram Courtesy of Fologram Courtesy of Fologram + 11

Stefano Boeri Combats Rural Decline With Free Initiative

16:00 - 2 June, 2018
Stefano Boeri Combats Rural Decline With Free Initiative, School Exterior Visualization. Image Courtesy of Stefano Boeri Architetti
School Exterior Visualization. Image Courtesy of Stefano Boeri Architetti

For the 2018 Venice BiennaleStefano Boeri Architetti presents Slow Food Freespace, the first Slow Village to be constructed in Sichuan, China. Made in collaboration with Slow Food Movement, speakers Stefano Boeri and Carlo Petrini discussed the project at the event “Across Chinese Cities - The Community.” 

For the Slow Food China project, Stefano Boeri Architetti has designed a school, a library and a small museum for the villages involved, free of charge. The program attempts to encourage millions of Chinese farmers to stay in their rural districts, combatting the unprecedented emigration to cities which has grown in the last few years. By offering educational facilities and cultural landmarks to these rural communities, it inspires the preservation of local culture and acknowledges the importance of the agricultural economy.

Library Visualization. Image Courtesy of Stefano Boeri Architetti School Visualization. Image Courtesy of Stefano Boeri Architetti Masterplan. Image Courtesy of Stefano Boeri Architetti Elevations and Plans. Image Courtesy of Stefano Boeri Architetti + 7

Bee Breeders Announce Winners of Nemrut Volcano Eyes Competition

12:00 - 2 June, 2018
Bee Breeders Announce Winners of Nemrut Volcano Eyes Competition, First Prize. Image Courtesy of Bee Breeders
First Prize. Image Courtesy of Bee Breeders

Bee Breeders have announced the winners of the Nemrut Volcano Eyes Competition, where participants were tasked with designing a visitor observation platform on top of Nemrut, a dormant volcano in eastern Turkey. With the unique natural environment, including a caldera and a pair of lakes, the observation platform is intended to provide unobstructed views of the extraordinary landscape. The jury encouraged submissions that were cost-effective, environmentally-responsible, and energy-efficient.

Below are the winners of the competition: 

First Prize. Image Courtesy of Bee Breeders Third Prize. Image Courtesy of Bee Breeders Second Prize. Image Courtesy of Bee Breeders Green Award. Image Courtesy of Bee Breeders + 37

From Romantic Ruins to the Ultra-Real: A History of the Architectural Render

09:30 - 31 May, 2018

Throughout history, architects have used sketches and paintings to display to their clients the potential outcomes of the projects rattling around their minds. Since Brunelleschi’s adoption of drawn perspective in 1415, architectural visualizations have painted hyper-realistic imaginings of an ideal, where the walls are always clean, the light always shines in the most perfect way, and the inhabitants are always happy.

With technological advances in 3D modeling and digital rendering, this ability to sell an idea through a snapshot of the perfect architectural experience has become almost unrestricted. Many have criticized the dangers of unrealistic renderings that exceed reality and how they can create the illusion of a perfect project when, in fact, it is far from being resolved. However, this is only the natural next step in a history of fantastical representations, where the render becomes a piece of art itself. 

Below is a brief history of the interesting ways architects have chosen to depict their projectsfrom imagined time travel to the diagrammatic.

Ledoux, Theatre of Besançon Archigram's Walking City proposal. Image courtesy of Deutsches Architekturmuseum Gandy's Drawing of John Soane's Bank of England The Peak - 1983. Image © Zaha Hadid + 10

10 Inspiring Examples of Post-Disaster Architecture

08:00 - 28 May, 2018
10 Inspiring Examples of Post-Disaster Architecture, Shiftpods. Image via Advanced Shelter Systems
Shiftpods. Image via Advanced Shelter Systems

Following natural disaster or conflict, architecture plays a critical role in not only reconstructing lost infrastructure but also responding to the need for comfort and safety for those affected. Successful post-disaster architecture must meet both the short-term need for immediate shelter, as well as long-term needs for reconstruction and stability. Eight years after the 2010 Haiti earthquake, those displaced continue to reside in temporary shelters without adequate access to plumbing and electricity, revealing the critical importance of addressing long-term needs after disaster and conflict. 

Below, we've rounded up 10 impressive examples of post-disaster architecture that range from low-cost, short-term proposals to those that attempt to rebuild entire communities from the ground up:

Pop-Up Places of Worship. Image Courtesy of Lucas Boyd and Chad Greenlee Villa Verde Housing. Image © Suyin Chia Soma City Home-For-All. Image © Koichi Torimura Cardboard Cathedral. Image © Bridgit Anderson + 10

Oslo's Holocaust Center Reappropriates Former Norwegian Nazi Building

06:00 - 28 May, 2018
Oslo's Holocaust Center Reappropriates Former Norwegian Nazi Building, Exterior Visualization. Image Courtesy of Transborder Studio
Exterior Visualization. Image Courtesy of Transborder Studio

Transborder has announced their estimated completion date of 2020 for the extension to Oslo's Center for Studies of the Holocaust and Religious Minorities. The building, Villa Grande, was once the residence of the leader of the Norwegian Nazi Party during the invasion years. "This faceted legacy where important contributions to the appearance of the villa arose from a dark and hateful ideology, demanded a critical adaptation of the extension where one had to have a conscious attitude to historical layers of the building."

Reflective Pool. Image Courtesy of Transborder Studio Rooftop Garden. Image Courtesy of Transborder Studio Courtesy of Transborder Studio Section. Image Courtesy of Transborder Studio + 12

Neri Oxman and MIT Develop Programmable Biocomposites for Digital Fabrication

16:00 - 27 May, 2018
Courtesy of MIT Media Lab
Courtesy of MIT Media Lab

Neri Oxman and MIT have developed programmable water-based biocomposites for digital design and fabrication. Named Aguahoja, the project has exhibited both a pavilion and a series of artifacts constructed from molecular components found in tree branches, insect exoskeletons, and our own bones. It uses natural ecosystems as inspiration for a material production process that produces no waste. “Derived from organic matter, printed by a robot, and shaped by water, this work points toward a future where the grown and the made unite.”

Courtesy of MIT Media Lab Courtesy of MIT Media Lab Courtesy of MIT Media Lab Courtesy of MIT Media Lab + 15

Eva Franch i Gilabert on the Meaning of Architecture

14:00 - 27 May, 2018

Architecture isn’t just about big names and big buildings but about all kinds of social practices.

In the latest video from NOWNESS' Design Futures series, Eva Franch i Gilabert walks the streets of New York as she discusses the role of architecture and its potential for the future. Franch i Gilabert is a Catalan architect, educator, and curator. She is also London's Architectural Association's youngest, and first woman director. 

Courtesy of Nowness Courtesy of Nowness Courtesy of Nowness Courtesy of Nowness + 6

This Instagram is Dedicated to Stunning Walls From Across the World

08:00 - 27 May, 2018

As architects, we all have a 'thing' for walls, windows, and everything in-between. The aptly named Instagram account @ihaveathingforwalls celebrates the beauty of walls—the peeling, the painted, the colorful, the dilapidated. As a curated selection of submissions from their followers, the page displays photographs of walls from Warsaw to Hong Kong; snapshots of beauty from everyday life.  

Take a tour of walls across the globe below, and feel inspired to pay a little more attention to the surfaces around you:

Polished Concrete: How It Is Made and What to Consider When Using It in Your Projects

09:30 - 14 May, 2018
LIEVITO - Gourmet Pizza and Bar / MDDM STUDIO. Image © Jonathan Leijonhufvud
LIEVITO - Gourmet Pizza and Bar / MDDM STUDIO. Image © Jonathan Leijonhufvud

Polished concrete is a versatile material that is easily customizable in its appearance, using stunning aggregates, quartz, and colors to create a sense of industrial sophistication in both homes and commercial buildings. Its reflective surface creates an evocative quality under light, which can be suitable for a variety of programs.

While still mainly used as a material for interior flooring, architects have been pushing the limits of polished concrete for years, using it for feature walls, patio floors and even large exterior panels such as in David Chipperfield’s extension to the Saint Louis Art Museum

Brick House / Clare Cousins Architects. Image © Shannon McGrath Urban Man Cave / Inhouse Brand Architects. Image © Riaan West The Apple Store / pH+. Image © Tim Soar Kristalia New Headquarters / Sandro Burigana. Image © Paolo Contratti - Contratticompany Srl + 16

The Best Architecture Reads this Spring: 19 New Books Selected by Metropolis Magazine

09:30 - 12 May, 2018
The Best Architecture Reads this Spring: 19 New Books Selected by Metropolis Magazine, Courtesy of Metropolis Magazine
Courtesy of Metropolis Magazine

Metropolis Magazine has released a curated list of 19 new books to read this spring, with topics ranging from the evolution of social housing to Stanley Kubrick's unfilmed masterpiece to a fascinating tome on the architecture of Zionism. Not simply volumes detailing well-tread histories, these chosen titles explore every niche category through the lens of architecture. Ever wondered how Buckminster Fuller inspired six former gang members to construct his geodesic dome? Or what metro stations in North Korea look like?

How Art Can Use Architecture to Spill Beyond the Gallery Space

10:00 - 6 May, 2018

In their latest video from the Time-Space-Existence series, PLANE—SITE features acclaimed conceptual artist Lawrence Weiner and his ideas regarding the relationship between people and material objects, language as a gesture, and making art accessible to the public. Lawrence Weiner is known for his typographical art applied onto elements of the built environment, and he describes how architecture itself can become an alternative space to present art.

Rose F. Kennedy Greenway Mural, Boston 2015. Image© Geoff Hargadon Rocca Albornoziana, Spoleto, Italy 1996. Image© Aurelio Amendola Galeria Alfonso Artiaco, Naples, 2016. Image© Luciano Romano Milwaukee Art Museum, 2017. Image© John Magnoski + 8