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Olson Kundig Designs Rooftop Play Space in South Korea

© Olson Kundig Architects
© Olson Kundig Architects

In collaboration with client Shinsegae, Olson Kundig Architects has designed a 20,000 square foot roof garden in Uijeongbu, South Korea.  Sitting atop the ninth floor of a twelve story department store, the park acts as a playground for children and a cultural center for the community.  The project follows a rising trend: placing green spaces on top of buildings in urban areas to create safe and secluded public places.  This particular garden uses entirely native species and incorporates sculptures by the artist Do-Ho Suh.

© Olson Kundig Architects © Olson Kundig Architects © Olson Kundig Architects © Olson Kundig Architects

Urban Agriculture Part I: What Cuba Can Teach Us

Havana Cuba. CC Flickr User weaver.
Havana Cuba. CC Flickr User weaver.

Everyday, in the city of London, 30 million meals are served. That’s millions of trucks arriving to millions of stores and restaurants in a complex, tightly scheduled orchestration of production, transportation, and distribution.

We take it for granted that this system will never fail. But what would happen if these trucks were stopped? As unrealistic as it sounds, it’s happened – and not so long ago.

In 1989, over 57% of Cuba’s caloric intake was imported from the Soviet Union. When it collapsed, Cuba became, virtually overnight, solely responsible for feeding its population – including the 2.2 million in the city of Havana. [1] What happened next is an incredible story of resilience and innovation.

As our world becomes increasingly urbanized, our farms increasingly endangered, and our reliance upon fossil fuels increasingly undesirable, the question of how we will feed billions of future city dwellers is no mere thought experiment – it’s an urgent reality.

The story of Cuba offers us an interesting question:  What would our cities look like if we began to place food production/distribution as the primary focus of urban design? And what will it take to make this vision a reality?

More on how Food can shape our cities, after the break…

ZAC bords de seine / ECDM Architects

ECDM Architects recently designed another housing project (we just shared their Student Housing Project earlier on AD) in the Issy les moulineaux, France.  Entitled ZAC bords de seine the project features retail and mixed service areas in addition to several gardens that create “an intelligent living space that turns to its surrounding environment and weather elements for assistance.”

More about the project after the break.

ORDOS 100 #11: NL Architects

This villa is located in plot ORDOS project.

Architects: NL Architects – Pieter Bannenberg, Walter van Dijk, Kamiel Klaasse Location: Ordos, Inner Mongolia, China Project leader: Michael Schoner Project team: Jung-Hwa Cho, Gen Yamamoto, Florent Le Corre, Wei-Nien Chen, Amadeo Linke Structural Engineer: ABT Delft, Walter Spangenberg Climate Consultant: DGMR, Paul van Bergen Design year: 2008 Construction year: 2009 Curator: Ai Weiwei, Beijing, China Client: Jiang Yuan Water Engineering Ltd, Inner Mongolia, China Constructed Area: 1,000 sqm aprox

ORDOS 100 #9: Sou Fujimoto

model
model

This villa is located in plot ORDOS project.

Architects: Sou Fujimoto Architects Location: Ordos, Inner Mongolia, China Design year: 2008 Construction year: 2009 Curator: Ai Weiwei, Beijing, China Client: Jiang Yuan Water Engineering Ltd, Inner Mongolia, China Constructed Area: 1,000 sqm aprox

ORDOS 100 #8: R&Sie(n)

This villa is located in plot ORDOS project.

Architects: R&Sie(n) Location: Ordos, Inner Mongolia, China Architects in Charge: Francois Roche, Stephanie Lavaux, Toshikatsu Kiuchi Design year: 2008 Construction year: 2009 Curator: Ai Weiwei, Beijing, China Client: Jiang Yuan Water Engineering Ltd, Inner Mongolia, China Constructed Area: 1,000 sqm aprox

FARO wins sustainable design competition with residencial tower

FARO architecten bv just shared with us their latest project, the winning entry for a sustainable residential tower design competition.

Text from the architects and more images after the break.

In Progress: Mountain Dwellings / BIG

by HOME
by HOME

Right next to their VM Housing project, BIG is currently finishing their new project: Mountain Dwellings. But this time, the client asked for a specific program with 2/3 parking and 1/3 living. Rather than doing 2 separate buildings, BIG decided to combine the splendours of the suburban backyard with the social intensity of urban density, resulting on a terraced housing over the parking area.