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Zaha Hadid Architects and Others Envision Heathrow's Future

08:00 - 12 May, 2016
Zaha Hadid Architects and Others Envision Heathrow's Future , Zaha Hadid Architects Vision. Image Courtesy of Heathrow Media Centre
Zaha Hadid Architects Vision. Image Courtesy of Heathrow Media Centre

Heathrow Airport is offering a first glimpse at commissioned expansion proposals by Zaha Hadid Architects, Grimshaw, HOK, and Benoy, that will shape the future of the global hub in London. The project brief called for "bold ideas to create a world-class sustainable airport that [will] deliver innovations in passenger service, integrate local communities, and showcase the best of British design." Challenging the architects to push the boundaries of what is the current airport typology, the proposals are meant to drive a step change in global airport design.

Zaha Hadid Architects Vision. Image Courtesy of Heathrow Media Centre Grimshaw Vision. Image Courtesy of Heathrow Media Centre HOK Vision. Image Courtesy of Heathrow Media Centre Benoy Vision. Image Courtesy of Heathrow Media Centre +4

WOHA Unveils “Fragments of an Urban Future” for the 2016 Venice Biennale

06:00 - 12 May, 2016
WOHA Unveils “Fragments of an Urban Future” for the 2016 Venice Biennale, PARKROYAL on Pickering. Image Courtesy of WOHA Architects
PARKROYAL on Pickering. Image Courtesy of WOHA Architects

Singapore-based WOHA’s “Fragments of an Urban Future” will be on display at the 2016 Venice Biennale, addressing some of the critical issues that megacities face today --  “unprecedented urbanization, accelerating climate change and the need for preservation of tropical biodiversity.” Part of the Global Art Affairs Foundation’s collateral exhibition, “TIME SPACE EXISTENCE,” WOHA’s contribution will be housed in the Palazzo Bembo.

BIG, Arup, and Aecom Are Now Partners With Hyperloop One

16:00 - 11 May, 2016
BIG, Arup, and Aecom Are Now Partners With Hyperloop One, Courtesy of Hyperloop One
Courtesy of Hyperloop One

Elon Musk first proposed Hyperloop transit in 2013, but the innovator responsible for Tesla and SpaceX has yielded to outsiders to test and build the technology. In response to that challenge, Hyperloop One (formerly Hyperloop Technologies, Inc. rebranded as to not be confused with Hyperloop Transportation Technologies, a competitor) conducted its first test today on a track north of Las Vegas. Meanwhile as reported on Slate and The Verge, Hyperloop Transportation Technologies has simultaneously been working on a different passive magnetic levitation system developed by Lawrence Livermore National Labs. For those unfamiliar, Hyperloop is a tubular transit system that relies on maglev (magnetic-levitation) technology to transport passengers or cargo at speeds in excess of 700 miles per hour, in other words, traveling from Los Angeles to San Francisco in half an hour.

Steven Holl Designs a New Visual Arts Building for Franklin & Marshall College

12:30 - 11 May, 2016
Steven Holl Designs a New Visual Arts Building for Franklin & Marshall College, Exterior, Day View. Image Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects
Exterior, Day View. Image Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects

Steven Holl Architects has been commissioned by Franklin & Marshall College, in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, for a new Visual Arts Building and Quad, promoting a future for the arts on the campus. Inspired by the trees that will surround the building, Holl calls the project a “pavilion on the park,” in a design compared to a kite in the trees. The project was announced by President Daniel R. Porterfield during F&M’s commencement on May 7, after Holl and Senior Partner Chris McVoy presented their concept to the College Board of Trustees two days prior.

Crossrail Unveils New Station Designs for London's Elizabeth Line

12:00 - 11 May, 2016
Paddington Station, Proposed Ticket Hall. Image Courtesy of Crossrail
Paddington Station, Proposed Ticket Hall. Image Courtesy of Crossrail

Crossrail Limited has released new renderings of stations set to open on the Elizabeth Line in London. Notable features of the new stations include step-free access from train to street, and seamless integration into the existing Transport for London (TfL) network. Seating, signage and full-height platform screen doors emulate precedents within the system to promote ease and familiarity. The designs strive for simplicity and clarity with reduced visual clutter and clear sight lines along platforms. Additionally, there will be permanent artworks installed and fully-integrated in many of the central London stations. The stations depicted – Paddington, architect Weston Williamson, Bond Street, architect John McAslan + Partners, Tottenham Court Road, architect Hawkins\Brown, Farringdon, architect Aedas, Liverpool Street, architect Wilkinson Eyre, Whitechapel, architect BDP, and Woolwich, architect Weston Williamson – are scheduled to begin service in December of 2018.

Tottenham Court Road, Proposed Platform Level at Dean Street. Image Courtesy of Crossrail Farringdon Station, Proposed Platform Level Concourse. Image Courtesy of Crossrail Woolwich Station, Proposed Platform. Image Courtesy of Crossrail Farringdon Station, Proposed Station Concourse at Cowcross Street Entrance. Image Courtesy of Crossrail +16

Tour the Technical Features of Snøhetta's New SFMOMA with WIRED

08:00 - 11 May, 2016
Tour the Technical Features of Snøhetta's New SFMOMA with WIRED, © Henrik Kam
© Henrik Kam

The story of the new Museum of Modern Art in San Francisco combines a number of compelling storylines: the expansion of a major museum to become the biggest space dedicated to modern art in the country; a new headline project for the much-lauded architectural firm Snøhetta; and the alteration (or lobotomization, depending on who you ask) of a modern classic in Mario Botta's original 1995 building. As such, it's been a big talking point recently, as the museum plans to reopen this Sunday.

However, while the media has talked a lot about galleries, external appearances and staircases, much less has been said of the project's innovative combined lighting and HVAC system, efficient six-layer windows and unprecedented use of fiber-reinforced-plastic on a building so tall. Enter WIRED, whose impressive article on the building takes us on a guided tour of the more technical aspects of the project, using a 3D model as a guide. Read their article in full here.

Against the Tide: Chile’s Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale

06:00 - 11 May, 2016

Curated by Juan Román and José Luis Uribe, Chile’s pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale will present 15 architecture projects that aim to transform the daily life of people living in rural areas of the country. 

Titled “Against the Tide,” the exhibition will feature the work of a new generation of architects – students from the School of Architecture of Talca. The projects were envisioned, designed and built by the students as part of their university graduation requirements.  

London's Victoria & Albert Museum to Present "A World of Fragile Parts" at 2016 Venice Biennale

04:00 - 11 May, 2016
London's Victoria & Albert Museum to Present "A World of Fragile Parts" at 2016 Venice Biennale, V&A Italian Cast Court, 1920. Image © V&A Images
V&A Italian Cast Court, 1920. Image © V&A Images

The 2016 Venice Biennale will see the inaugural collaboration between La Biennale and London's Victoria & Albert Museum (V&A) with an exhibition located in the Sale d’Armi (Arsenale) entitled A World of Fragile Parts. The show aims to explore the threats facing the preservation of global heritage sites and how the production of copies can aid in the preservation of cultural artefacts.

New York 2030: This Annotated Visualization Shows Us the Manhattan of the Future

16:30 - 10 May, 2016
Courtesy of VISUALHOUSE
Courtesy of VISUALHOUSE

Fourteen years from now, New York's skyline will be one vastly different than the recognizable profile visible today. With dozens of new projects set to make their mark on the city, the creative design company Visualhouse - specializing in 3D visualizations -  has released a rendering of New York in 2030. “This image shows the who’s who of modern architecture - with buildings designed by Jean Nouvel, Rafael Vinoly, Bjarke Ingels Group, SOM, Foster + Partners, and Kohn Pedersen Fox, just to name a few," said Visualhouse CEO and Founder, Rob Herrick. "How these modern day masterpieces all fit together in the sky space, that will be the legacy for New Yorkers in 2030 and beyond."

Katie Paterson and Zeller & Moye Create "Hollow" With Over 10,000 Wood Specimens

14:30 - 10 May, 2016
Katie Paterson and Zeller & Moye Create "Hollow" With Over 10,000 Wood Specimens, Courtesy of University of Bristol and Situations. Photo: Max McClure
Courtesy of University of Bristol and Situations. Photo: Max McClure

A new installation by artist Katie Paterson and architects Zeller & Moye for the University of Bristol, Hollow has been permanently installed in the city’s Royal Fort Garden. Commissioned to mark the opening of the University’s new Life Sciences Building, adjacent to the gardens, the project has been organized by Bristol-based arts group, Situations. The installation, an agglomeration of wooden rods, is a collection of samples from over 10,000 unique tree species. Collected over a three-year period, the samples were sourced from arboretums, xylaria, herbaria, and collectors worldwide. The installation is joined by a companion website and public participation project, Treebank, in association with BBC Four.

Courtesy of University of Bristol and Situations. Photo: Max McClure Courtesy of University of Bristol and Situations. Photo: Max McClure Courtesy of University of Bristol and Situations. Photo: Max McClure Courtesy of University of Bristol and Situations. Photo: Max McClure +12

RIBA Announces Longlist of 30 Buildings for Inaugural International Prize

12:15 - 10 May, 2016
RIBA Announces Longlist of 30 Buildings for Inaugural International Prize

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has announced its longlist of 30 buildings to be considered for the inaugural RIBA International Prize. According to the organization, “Projects range from large urban infrastructure schemes to private residential projects; cultural destinations to civic spaces; academic buildings to places of worship. The RIBA International Prize will be awarded to the most significant and inspirational building of the year. The winning building will demonstrate visionary, innovative thinking and excellence of execution, whilst making a distinct contribution to its users and to its physical context.” This is the first RIBA Award to be open to any qualified architect in the world. 

The 30 long-listed buildings will be visited over the summer by the RIBA awards committee, after which, the list will be reduced to 20 winners of RIBA Awards for International Excellence. Subsequently, six finalists will be chosen and visited by a Grand Jury in the fall. According to RIBA, “[Awards for International Excellence] will be given to buildings worldwide that stretch the boundaries of architecture. Irrespective of style, complexity and size of both scheme and budget successful projects should demonstrate visionary or innovative thinking and excellence of execution.” The Grand Jury is being lead by Richard Rogers and includes Billie Tsien, Kunlé Adeyemi, Philip Gumuchdjian, and Marilyn Jordan Taylor.

View Stunning Photos of the Post-Utopian Sites of the World’s Fairs in This Kickstarter Book

08:00 - 10 May, 2016
View Stunning Photos of the Post-Utopian Sites of the World’s Fairs in This Kickstarter Book, Montreal 1967 World's Fair, "Man and His World," Buckminster Fuller's Geodesic Dome With Solar Experimental House 2012. Image © Jade Doskow
Montreal 1967 World's Fair, "Man and His World," Buckminster Fuller's Geodesic Dome With Solar Experimental House 2012. Image © Jade Doskow

Architectural and landscape photographer Jade Doskow is publishing the first hardcover, full-color monograph of her eight-year photography project on the post-utopian sites of the World’s Fairs, entitled Lost Utopias. Since 2007, the project has captured the remaining architecture and landscaping of international World’s Fairs at 26 sites in North America and Europe on large-format 4”x5” film.

Jury Members for the 2016 Venice Biennale Revealed

07:30 - 10 May, 2016
Jury Members for the 2016 Venice Biennale Revealed

The Board of Directors of La Biennale di Venezia, upon recommendation from Alejandro Aravena, have announced the jury for the forthcoming Venice Biennale who will award the Golden Lion for Best National Participation, the Golden Lion for Best Participant in the International Exhibition Reporting From the Front, and the Silver Lion for a Promising Young Participant in the International Exhibition Reporting From the FrontThey will also have the opportunity to award one special mention to National Participations and two special mentions to the participants in the International Exhibition.

RIBA Announces 17 Winners of South Awards

06:00 - 10 May, 2016
RIBA Announces 17 Winners of South Awards, Sandpath; Oxfordshire / Adrian James Architects.. Image © David Fisher
Sandpath; Oxfordshire / Adrian James Architects.. Image © David Fisher

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has announced 17 winners for its RIBA South Awards, which recognize architectural excellence. These 17 regional award winners were drawn from a shortlist of 30 projects. Over the next few months, they will be considered for the RIBA National Awards, and then for the RIBA Stirling Prize.

The 17 winners of the RIBA South East Awards are:

The Aga Khan Award for Architecture Announces 2016 Shortlist

15:40 - 9 May, 2016
The Aga Khan Award for Architecture Announces 2016 Shortlist

The Aga Khan Award for Architecture has announced a shortlist of 19 projects selected from 348 entries received from 69 countries. Presented once every three years, the award honors new standards of excellence in contemporary design, social housing, community improvement and development, historic preservation, reuse and area conservation, as well as landscape design and improvement of the environment. The basis for the Aga Khan Award is “to identify and encourage building concepts that successfully address the needs and aspirations of communities in which Muslims have a significant presence.” Selected by a Master Jury, the shortlisted projects will compete for $1 million dollars in prize money. Since its establishment in 1977, over 110 projects have received the award and more than 9,000 building projects have been documented.

7 Free Architectural History Books You Can Download From The Met

07:00 - 9 May, 2016
7 Free Architectural History Books You Can Download From The Met, © The Met
© The Met

MetPublications is a portal to The Met’s online publishing program, containing more than 1,500 books and other publications from the museum from the last fifty years. It includes descriptions for most titles as well as information on the author, publication reviews, and links to other similar titles.

The contents of many publications can be viewed online or downloaded in a PDF format. Readers can also search for works of art from The Met’s past collections. New titles are frequently added, expanding the online catalog.

Check out some of the architecture-related publications below and find more at the MetPublications Portal, here.

Arch Out Loud Announces Winners of New York City Aquarium Competition

16:00 - 8 May, 2016
Aquatrium. Image via Arch Out Loud
Aquatrium. Image via Arch Out Loud

Arch Out Loud has announced the winners of their New York City Aquarium and Public Waterfront Competition, which invited students and professionals alike to design "an intertwined public aquarium and park" on an underutilized riverfront property located on the East River in Queens. Participants were asked to “redefine the aquarium typology, examining its relationship to the urban context and the public domain.” 

The call for submissions was answered by 556 participants and 178 proposals from forty counties, and included ideas that pushed the physical boundaries of the site and responded to the idea of redefining the typical aquarium typology.

See All 36 Winners of the 2016 RIBA London Awards

12:00 - 8 May, 2016
See All 36 Winners of the 2016 RIBA London Awards, © Edmund Sumner
© Edmund Sumner

From a shortlist of 68 buildings, 36 London projects have been awarded the 2016 RIBA London Awards for architectural excellence, the city's most prestigious design honor. The winners include a home for ravens, a Japanese-inspired London terrace home and a historical restoration. All of these designs will be further considered for the RIBA National Awards, to be announced in July. The winners of the national award will then create a shortlist for the RIBA Stirling Prize – the highest award for architecture in the UK.

Brutalism and Culture: How St Peter's Seminary is Already Shining in its Second Life

09:30 - 8 May, 2016
Brutalism and Culture: How St Peter's Seminary is Already Shining in its Second Life, Built in 1966, St. Peter’s Seminary is hidden away in a forest 20 miles outside Glasgow. Image Courtesy of Courtesy Tom Kidd / Almay via Metropolis Magazine
Built in 1966, St. Peter’s Seminary is hidden away in a forest 20 miles outside Glasgow. Image Courtesy of Courtesy Tom Kidd / Almay via Metropolis Magazine

Gillespie, Kidd & Coia's celebrated St Peter's Seminary—once voted Scotland's best modern building—has for too long been a victim of fate, left to decay after it was abandoned just 20 years after its completion. Fortunately, plans are well underway to restore the building. This article, originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "Ruin Revived," explains how even in its ruined state, the dramatic brutalist structure is already showing its value as a cultural destination.

Modernist architecture, it used to be said, was inadequate because the machined materials of modern buildings wouldn’t lend themselves well to picturesque ruination. What, minus the taut skins of glass and plaster, could these stark, boxlike carcasses possibly communicate to future generations?

St. Peter’s Seminary in Cardross, Scotland, is a forceful rejoinder to that jibe. Built in 1966 and abandoned 20 years later, the seminary has settled into a state of pleasing decrepitude. Glass and plaster are long gone. The concrete remains largely intact but stained, spalled, and spoiled. Entire roofs and staircases have caved in. The only fresh signs of life are the aprons of graffiti draped all over the “interiors.” Yet, the sense of the place lingers, its noble forms still remarkably assertive—jutting forth from the dense surrounding forest—and optimistic.

MIT Celebrates Centennial of Cambridge Campus with Two Architecture Installations

14:00 - 7 May, 2016
MIT Celebrates Centennial of Cambridge Campus with Two Architecture Installations, Photomontage of the Memory Matrix installation at night in front of the Wiesner Building, MIT campus. Image credit: Photomontage by Azra Aksamija, 2016. Original photo of the MediaLab by Steve Mann. Image Courtesy of Resnicow and Associates
Photomontage of the Memory Matrix installation at night in front of the Wiesner Building, MIT campus. Image credit: Photomontage by Azra Aksamija, 2016. Original photo of the MediaLab by Steve Mann. Image Courtesy of Resnicow and Associates

In honor of the centenary of MIT's move to the Cambridge Campus, the university has carried out a series of public events this spring, including the installation of two innovative architecture and design projects: Memory Matrix and Biaxial Tower.

Installed in the iconic arch of MIT’s Wiesner Building (designed by Pritzker Prize winner and MIT alumni I.M. Pei), Memory Matrix is a giant screen made of intricate pixel-like Plexiglass elements, arranged to form larger matrix-like screens that reveal an image of the recently destroyed Arch of Triumph in Palmyra. The image is only visible during the day through the movement of wind and light, and at night, through the illumination of the pixels. Spearheaded by Azra Aksamija, Memory Matrix will be on display from April 23 through May 7.

RIBA Future Trends Survey for March 2016 Shows Signs of Workload Stability

12:00 - 7 May, 2016
RIBA Future Trends Survey for March 2016 Shows Signs of Workload Stability, Courtesy of The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA)
Courtesy of The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA)

The Royal Institute of British Architects’ (RIBA) Future Trends Survey for March 2016 has reported signs of stability after recent downward trends, with the balance figure rising from +21 in February up to +31 in March.

“All nations and regions returned positive workload forecasts, with practices in the North of England being the most optimistic. Large practices (51+ staff) remain the most positive. Medium-sized practices (11–50 staff, balance figure +48) saw a boost in confidence levels, while small practices (1–10 staff, balance figure +28) were upbeat, however to a lesser degree," states the report.

Pershing Square Renew Unveils Finalist Designs by wHY, James Corner Field Operations, and Others

14:00 - 6 May, 2016
Pershing Square Renew Unveils Finalist Designs by wHY, James Corner Field Operations, and Others

Pershing Square Renew has revealed the plans of four finalists for an overhaul to the oldest park in Los Angeles, Pershing Square. Opened in 1866, with subsequent name changes and redesigns – the most recent, by Mexican architect Ricardo Legorreta and landscape architect Laurie Olin, opened in 1994 – the park’s next identity could be crafted by wHY + Civitas, James Corner Field Operations with Frederick Fisher & Partners, Agence TER and Team, or SWA | Morphosis. The finalists were selected from a semi-finalist round of ten proposals last December, and now the Pershing Square Renew jury will deliberate before announcing a winner on May 12.

Courtesy of wHY + Civitas/Luxigon The large terraced lawn along 6th St. faces into the park and looks north to some of the very best views of central DTLA. The lawn terraces support casual lounging, seating, gathering and picnics, with an elevated balcony and overlooks at the top.. Image Courtesy of James Corner Field Operations Courtesy of Agence Ter and Team Courtesy of SWA/Morphosis +28

Zaha Hadid Architects Will Develop Brownfield Site Adjacent to Prague's Railway Station

10:00 - 6 May, 2016
Zaha Hadid Architects Will Develop Brownfield Site Adjacent to Prague's Railway Station, Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects
Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects

Zaha Hadid Architects (ZHA) has revealed plans to design and redevelop more than 22,000 square meters of brownfield land in Prague, in a 90,000 square meter development adjacent to the city’s Masaryk Railway Station. ZHA was selected by project partner Penta, an investment company active in ten markets across Europe, as the winner of a 2014 competition for the site. Devising a new central business district, the ZHA plan seeks to integrate with existing means of transit, including suburban and domestic rail services, a bus terminal, Line B of the city’s metro, and a future airport rail link to Vaclav Havel International Airport. Approximately one kilometer from Prague’s central square, the design seeks to create a balance between the horizontality of the railway lines and the verticality and publicness of the Old Town.

Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects +4

This 3D Model Shows the Damage Caused by ISIS to Palmyra's Temple of Bel

09:30 - 6 May, 2016

In August of last year, many of the most precious landmarks of the ancient city of Palmyra were damaged or destroyed by the forces of ISIS in a violent, iconoclastic attempt to send a message to the rest of the world. Since the UNESCO World Heritage Site was recaptured in March, the question in the architectural preservation community has been how to rebuild and preserve the buildings. That process will begin, of course, with a thorough assessment of the damage.

Shortly after Palmyra was recaptured Iconem, a French company which specializes in the digitization of archeological sites, arrived in Palmyra to lead the survey. In partnership with the Syrian DGAM (Direction Générale des Antiquités et des Musées), Iconem was granted access to the city to survey the damage to the temples of Bel and Baalshamin, the Monumental Arch, the Valley of Tombs, and the museum—all sites which are of the most cultural value and therefore were the greatest targets of ISIS's violence.

The Temple of Bel in Palmyra before the occupation by ISIS. Image © Flickr User Alessandra Kocman licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 The Temple of Bel in Palmyra before the occupation by ISIS. Image © Flickr User Jiří Suchomel licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 The Temple of Bel in Palmyra before the occupation by ISIS. Image © Flickr User Alessandra Kocman licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 The Temple of Bel in Palmyra before the occupation by ISIS. Image © Flickr User Jiří Suchomel licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 +6