ArchDaily | Broadcasting Architecture Worldwidethe world's most visited architecture website

i

Sign up now and start saving and organizing your favorite architecture projects and photos

i

Find the most inspiring products for your projects in our Product Catalog.

i

Get the ArchDaily Chrome Extension and be inspired with every new tab. Install here »

All
Projects
Products
Events
Competitions

Steven Holl Architects Wins Competition to Design Rubenstein Commons at Institute for Advanced Study

12:00 - 22 March, 2016
Steven Holl Architects Wins Competition to Design Rubenstein Commons at Institute for Advanced Study, Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects
Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects

Steven Holl Architects has been selected as the winner of an invited competition to design the Rubenstein Commons at the Institute for Advanced Study (IAS) located in Princeton, New Jersey. The new Rubenstein Commons will be situated at the center of the campus and serve as a new forum for scholars to interact and share ideas. The IAS, which was home to where Albert Einstein worked for 22 years until his death in 1955, received the project funding from David Rubenstein, Co-Founder and Co-CEO of the Carlyle Group.

The Top 100 Universities in the World for Architecture 2016

09:45 - 22 March, 2016
The Top 100 Universities in the World for Architecture 2016, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Image © Wikimedia user Fcb981 licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Image © Wikimedia user Fcb981 licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

QS has released its 2016 rankings of the top 100 schools for architecture in the world. The company has produced an annual survey of universities since 2011, now comparing including over 800 universities worldwide across 42 subjects, and rating the top universities based on academic reputation, employer reputation and research impact. As they did last year, MIT came out top of the list in architecture. Read on for the full rankings list for architecture, and be sure to visit QS's site for the full rankings list which is sortable by subject, country or continent.

The Demolition of Plovdiv’s Tobacco Warehouse Demands a New Response from Citizens

09:30 - 22 March, 2016
The Demolition of Plovdiv’s Tobacco Warehouse Demands a New Response from Citizens, The Tobacco Warehouse before demolition. Image © Open Arts Foundation
The Tobacco Warehouse before demolition. Image © Open Arts Foundation

The public of Plovdiv, and of Bulgaria, woke up on Monday the 7th March—after their national holiday celebration—with a national cultural monument and a key piece of the city's identity on the ground in pieces. The building was one of the standout structures of “Tobacco Town”—a complex of former tobacco industry warehouses. The demolition by its owners began despite a promise made by Mayor Ivan Totev in September that the entire complex would be renovated as an urban art zone as part of the preparations for Plovdiv European Capital of Culture 2019.

Plovdiv, a city in the south of Bulgaria with its 7 hills, is one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in Europe. The Thracians, Romans, and Ottomans all employed its strategic location, and today it is Bulgaria’s second largest city. The title of cultural capital is well deserved, and perhaps even well overdue. With its arrival, there was hope that major parts of the city's history lying in disrepair may finally have a standing chance, and then this… another building, gone.

Everybody's heart is heavy. They are in disbelief. The questions are the same as the ones that have been asked many times before: “How did this happen?” “Who did this?”

A Round-Up of Water-Based Projects for World Water Day 2016

06:00 - 22 March, 2016
A Round-Up of Water-Based Projects for World Water Day 2016

A year of controversies over water-related projects like Thomas Heatherwick’s Garden Bridge in London, or Frank Gehry’s LA River master plan in Los Angeles, can paint a fraught portrait of the relationship between design and one of our most precious resources. But in honor of World Water Day, we have rounded up some of the projects that represent the most strategic, innovative, and unexpected intersections of design and H2O that have been featured on ArchDaily.

Architecture and water have a long history of intersection, from the aqueducts engineered by the Romans to Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater, and the relationship holds new value in an age of climate change coupled with evolving modes of thinking about the relationship between humans and ecology. An ever-broadening understanding of the human need for water—from health and hygiene to recreation and wonder—has ensured that new ways to incorporate this classic element into vanguard designs has flourished. The following projects feature water in a variety of ways, from proximity to bodies of water, to designs literally shaped or formed by their relationship to moisture, to projects that are physically immersed in the liquid, and finally other projects which are only visions of a yet-unbuilt future.

Kuwaiti Pavilion at 2016 Venice Biennale Entitled "Between East and West: a Gulf"

14:00 - 21 March, 2016

The third Kuwaiti Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale, entitled ‘Between East and West: A Gulf’, will "look past Kuwait’s borders to the contested hydrography of the Persian/Arabian Gulf" in order to propose a new masterplan for the region. Curated by Hamed Bukhamseen from Kuwait and Ali Karimi from Bahrain the pavilion will, in an area of physical, religious, and political division, "tell the story of the Gulf’s islands and the possibilities they hold for a joint territorial project."

AL_A to Redesign Flagship Galeries Lafayette in Paris

12:00 - 21 March, 2016
AL_A to Redesign Flagship Galeries Lafayette in Paris, via Galeries Lafayette group
via Galeries Lafayette group

French department store Galeries Lafayette has selected London based AL_A to transform their historic flagship store on Boulevard Haussmann in Paris. Galeries Lafayette selected them with the goal of “building the department store of the 21st century” which will be designed to bring a completely new shopping experience to customers. The remodeling of the 40,000 square meter store is scheduled to begin in early 2017.

Cinema and the City: 10 Films Starring Cities

06:00 - 21 March, 2016
Cinema and the City: 10 Films Starring Cities, Asas do Desejo, Wim Wenders (1987)
Asas do Desejo, Wim Wenders (1987)

The city has been explored as a theme in movies since the early days of cinema, appearing as both a setting and a protagonist in films by renowned directors like Fritz Lang, Jean-Luc Godard, François Truffaut, Roberto Rossellini and Quentin Tarantino. In one of the first films ever made, Arrival of a Train at La Ciotat (1925), the Lumière brothers already show the modern urban environment as an important element and part of the contextualization.

Yet the cinema and the city have an extensive relationship, each influencing one another. The influence of architecture (especially modern) in the settings and cities of films can be seen in movies like Jacques Tati’s My Uncle (1958) and Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner (1982), while the influence of cinema in architecture and buildings can be seen in the work of architects like Rem Koolhaas, Jean Nouvel and Bernard Tschumi.

We have compiled a list of 10 films in which the city plays a much more important role than just the mere setting, acting as a true protagonist of the plot. 

These Architects' Drawings of Human Figures Offer an Insight Into Their Minds

14:00 - 20 March, 2016
These Architects' Drawings of Human Figures Offer an Insight Into Their Minds, Courtesy of Noor Makkiya
Courtesy of Noor Makkiya

While there are many different approaches creating architectural space, most architects agree that the primacy of the human is paramount to the creation of a successful design. We perceive architecture through our senses, interpret its scale in comparison to our bodies, and of course require architecture to protect our bodies from the forces of nature. For these reasons, designers often include human figures in their sketches to give a better sense of the scale and atmosphere of their design.

However, often these figures can be even more revealing. "Architects project themselves into the human figure," explains Noor Makkiya, who has collected a selection of figures from the sketches of the world's best-known architects. "So if we compare drawings from different architects, we frequently find differences in body shape and body activity, for practicing architects often represent their own ideologies as a reference for understanding the human physical condition."

From the scientific body proportion studies used by Da Vinci and Le Corbusier, to the primitive figure used by Glenn Murcutt, to the creative explosion that is Frank Gehry's deconstructed human, read on to see the full set collected by Makkiya.

Álvaro Siza Restores the Carmo Convent Area in Lisbon

12:00 - 20 March, 2016
Álvaro Siza Restores the Carmo Convent Area in Lisbon, via Câmara Municipal de Lisboa
via Câmara Municipal de Lisboa

Due to a fire in 1988, the Chiado district of Lisbon had many of its buildings damaged or partially destroyed by the flames, and an intense restoration and recovery project led by Álvaro Siza has been going on for over a decade.

Among the strategies employed by the Portuguese architect (and winner of the 1989 Pritzker Prize) is the reorganization of routes and walkways, creating elevated walkways to facilitate access to the area and the flow of locals and visitors. According to the Municipal Council of Lisbon, Siza has recently completed the connection between one of the courtyards of the Carmo Convent (Patio B) to the Largo do Carmo square and the Carmo Terraces with a pedestrian path.

via Câmara Municipal de Lisboa via Câmara Municipal de Lisboa via Câmara Municipal de Lisboa via Câmara Municipal de Lisboa +8

a2o architecten Wins Competition for Crematorium in Belgium

08:00 - 20 March, 2016
a2o architecten Wins Competition for Crematorium in Belgium, Courtesy of a2o architecten
Courtesy of a2o architecten

a2o architecten, in partnership with artist Jan De Cock, has won a competition to design a crematorium in Lommel, Belgium. The goal of the project is to integrate the crematorium into the existing cemetery, which shares the site. The design is heavily symbolic and is based off of the idea of “the journey” of saying farewell to a loved one.

Petition Launched to Save Moscow's Shukhov Tower

12:00 - 19 March, 2016
Petition Launched to Save Moscow's Shukhov Tower, Courtesy of The World Monuments Fund
Courtesy of The World Monuments Fund

A two-day event will be held on Saturday, March 19, and Sunday, March 20, 2016, in Moscow, Russia, to celebrate the 94th anniversary of the Shukhov Tower and the official launch of a petition to save the Constructivist landmark, which faces a "looming threat of demolition." The tower is on the 2016 World Monuments Watch, as well as the World Monument Fund’s biennial list of at-risk cultural heritage sites worldwide.

Built between 1919 and 1922 by Vladimir Shukhov, the tower is a landmark in the history of structural engineering, and “is an emblem of the creative genius of an entire generation of modernist architects in the years that followed the Russian Revolution.”

The Magic of Light in Hexham Abbey

09:30 - 19 March, 2016

In his project Abbey Time Shift architectural photographer Andy Marshall sought to capture the elusive nature of time by documenting the subtle shifts of light across the hand-laid masonry of Hexham Abbey in Hexham, Northumberland, in the northeast of England. Using the camera's ability to isolate changes in light that might be imperceptible to the human eye, Marshall set up "the gentlest of traps" to create videos and still-image collages of particular views and vantages of the Abbey as the sun emphasized the relics and architectural details within. Spending several days in the Abbey in 2013, Marshall watched light gather and fade in real time, but he has repackaged his own experience into a short video and collages for all to enjoy. In a project that counterpoints the speed and precision that characterizes most of our lives, Abbey Time Shift asks us to to slow down and admire the delicacy and beauty of the nearly indiscernible.

SO/AP Architectes Reveals Tokyo Pop Lab Proposal

08:00 - 19 March, 2016
SO/AP Architectes Reveals Tokyo Pop Lab Proposal , Courtesy of SO/AP Architectes
Courtesy of SO/AP Architectes

SO/AP Architectes has released its proposal for the Tokyo Pop Lab competition, which recently announced its winners. Based on the duality of environmental vulnerability and the omnipresence of numeric technology, the 3,500 square meter design focuses on the battle between mankind and nature.

Finalists Announced for 2014/2015 MCHAP.emerge Awards

16:00 - 18 March, 2016
Finalists Announced for 2014/2015 MCHAP.emerge Awards

The Mies Crown Hall Americas Prize has announced five finalists for its biannual MCHAP.emerge awards, celebrating the best architecture in the Americas by emerging practices. The five projects were selected from a list of 55, coming from 95 different nominators, that were announced last week. The projects represent the best architecture completed by young architects over the past two years in both North and South America, with finalists coming from Canada, the United States, Mexico, Chile and Paraguay.

The winner of the prize will be announced on the evening of April 1st at a symposium at the S. R. Crown Hall in Chicago, after an afternoon in which the finalists present their work to the jury, and the Architecture faculty and student body of IIT. Read on to see the list of finalists.

3 Materials With the Potential to Improve Traditional Concrete

14:00 - 18 March, 2016
3 Materials With the Potential to Improve Traditional Concrete, TAKTL's ultra-high-performance concrete panels on the Waikiki Business Plaza by MGA Architecture. Image Courtesy of TAKTL
TAKTL's ultra-high-performance concrete panels on the Waikiki Business Plaza by MGA Architecture. Image Courtesy of TAKTL

It's no secret that among the architecture profession's biggest sources of guilt is our reliance on concrete in a huge number of the buildings that we have a hand in creating. Architects are more likely than most to be aware of the environmental implications of the material, and yet we continue to use it at an alarming rate. But what alternatives are there in order to do our job? In an article for Forbes, Laurie Winkless runs down a list of three alternatives that stand a good chance of changing the face of concrete construction.

Monocle 24 Talk to MVRDV and Malcolm Reading About the Architectural Competition

04:30 - 18 March, 2016
Monocle 24 Talk to MVRDV and Malcolm Reading About the Architectural Competition, Guggenheim Helsinki competition jury. Image Courtesy of Monocle
Guggenheim Helsinki competition jury. Image Courtesy of Monocle

The latest edition of Section DMonocle 24's weekly review of design, architecture and craft, examines the architectural competition: "a critically important but less visible facet of the architectural world." Monocle's Henry Rees-Sheridan talks to Jacob van Rijs, co-founder of MVRDV, about how the practice incorporates unbuilt plans and competition entries into its business model; Malcolm Reading, head of "the leading independent organiser of architectural competitions in the UK," about what goes into creating a successful architecture competition; and ArchDaily Editor James Taylor-Foster about how the unbuilt world affects the built.

Project Abandoned for 27 Years To Be Revitalized in Montenegro

12:00 - 17 March, 2016
Project Abandoned for 27 Years To Be Revitalized in Montenegro, Courtesy of  SADAR+VUGA and HHF architekten
Courtesy of SADAR+VUGA and HHF architekten

SADAR+VUGA, HHF architekten, and local consultant Archicon have received first prize in the competition for the adaptation and reconstruction of the Dom Revolucije (Home of Revolution) in Nikšić, Montenegro.

The existing structure, built by Slovenian architect Marko Mušič, was originally intended to represent the socio-political structure of Nikšić, Montenegro and Yugoslavia as a whole. Construction began on the building in 1978, and after eleven years, work was suspended, leaving the site uncompleted in the middle of the city for 27 years.

The new proposal will transform the Home of Revolution by utilizing the existing built structure—mainly a shell—and inserting minimal interventions to create a new type of urban space.

20 Creative Adaptive Reuse Projects

08:00 - 17 March, 2016
20 Creative Adaptive Reuse Projects

After built structures become disused or abandoned, adaptive reuse can be the perfect way to breathe new life into an old building, while conserving resources and historic value. Whether due to environmental reasons, land availability or the desire to conserve a historic landmark, countless architectural firms worldwide are turning to adaptive reuse as a solution to some of the modern problems of the built environment.

With this in mind, we have compiled a list of 20 creative adaptive reuse projects, each of which utilizes an old structure to create a revitalized form in its own distinct way.

See how a former chapel, water tower and 19th century slaughterhouse were transformed and given new life, after the break.

Survey Results Show More Tall Buildings Planned for London

06:00 - 17 March, 2016
Survey Results Show More Tall Buildings Planned for London, © Visualhouse and photographer Dan Lowe
© Visualhouse and photographer Dan Lowe

Since this time last year, an additional 119 new tall buildings have been planned for London, according to a report published by New London Architecture (NLA) and GLHearn. This brings the total number of planned, tall buildings -- buildings of 20 floors or taller -- to 436.

The research conducted by the NLA shows that since last year, the number of tall buildings undergoing construction has inched from 70 to 89. An impressive 223 tall buildings have received planning approval and 114 towers are in pre-application or planning stages. Ninety-four tall buildings, up from 72 buildings in the previous year, were submitted for planning. Of those 94, 43 were approved in the same year. The survey also notes that a significant number of these tall buildings are part of larger scale master plans, which situate multiple towers in clusters.

"Floating Fields" Wins Shenzhen UABB Award And is Set to Continue Through 2016

04:00 - 17 March, 2016
"Floating Fields" Wins Shenzhen UABB Award And is Set to Continue Through 2016, © Thomas Chung
© Thomas Chung

The Urbanism\Architecture Bi-City Biennale (UABB) in Shenzhen finished in February, but at least one element of it lives on. Floating Fields, a project by Thomas Chung, Associate Professor of Architecture at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, was installed at the UABB site at the Dacheng Flour Mills in Shekhou as a demonstration of a concept to return agriculture to the Shenzhen's bay with floating agricultural fields. The project, which forms the major landscape piece at the Biennale, received the Biennale Organising Committee Award at the event's closing ceremony.

© Thomas Chung © Thomas Chung © Thomas Chung © Thomas Chung +25

Kazuyo Sejima Designs New Express Train for Japan

12:28 - 16 March, 2016
Kazuyo Sejima Designs New Express Train for Japan, © Seibu Railway
© Seibu Railway

Kazuyo Sejima is designing a new express train for Japan. Commissioned by Seibu Group, the Limited Express train would be a "friendly" addition to the company's "Red Arrow" series, which so far boasts brightly colored, traditional designs that stand out from the surroundings.

Much like Sejima's architecture, the initial concept reveals a light, semi-transparent design that allows the train to blend into the landscape.

These Sheets of Graph Paper Were Used to Design Super Mario Bros

08:00 - 16 March, 2016
These Sheets of Graph Paper Were Used to Design Super Mario Bros, via Nintendo [Youtube]
via Nintendo [Youtube]

More than 6 million courses have been created for Super Mario Maker, a video game where players can create their own game levels with all of the available tools of the Mario universe. The plumber, who has entertained millions of people around the world with his adventures, turned 30 last September, the date of the release of his first solo odyssey, Super Mario Bros. The rest, as we know, is history.

A few months ago, for the premiere of Super Mario Maker at the last Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3 2015), Shigeru Miyamoto and Takashi Tezuka, the creators of Super Mario Bros, explained how they designed the levels of the classic Nintendo video game in 1985: on graph paper.

That's right, using graph paper and tracing paper, the Japanese artists drew each level in detail, adding and editing the position of enemies, traps, and even designing the game's cover art.

via Nintendo [Youtube] via Nintendo [Youtube] via Nintendo [Youtube] via Nintendo [Youtube] +11

Kengo Kuma's First Building in Australia Revealed

14:00 - 15 March, 2016
Kengo Kuma's First Building in Australia Revealed, © Kengo Kuma, via SMH
© Kengo Kuma, via SMH

Darling Harbour has commissioned Kengo Kuma to design a new civic and creative center in Sydney - the Japanese practice's first Australian project. The 30-meter-tall, wood-clad "Darling Exchange" will rise six stories and provide space for a ground-floor market hall, library, childcare center, makerspace, and additional program for start-ups, as well as a rooftop bar and restaurant. 

“Our aim is to achieve architecture that is an open and tangible as possible to the community, and this is reflected in the circular geometry that creates a building that is accessible and recognizable from multiple directions,” said Kuma. 

OMA's First UAE Project to be in Dubai

12:30 - 15 March, 2016
OMA's First UAE Project to be in Dubai , © OMA
© OMA

OMA has won a commission to design their first project in the United Arab Emirates. The winning proposal will transform four warehouses on Dubai's Alserkal Avenue into a new multi-purpose venue that will connect local architects and artists, and highlight the role intelligent design plays in the city. 

“The main strategy for the design of the event space is to blur the boundary between interior and exterior by bringing view and daylight into the space and extending the action and events to the public space outside," said Iyad Alsaka, OMA's MEA Partner in Charge.