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Lighting: The Latest Architecture and News

Designing Meeting Rooms for the Contemporary Office: Partitions, Seating, Tables and Lighting

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“Two brains are better than one,” goes the old saying. And with good reason. As the social beings that we are, humans thrive through interpersonal interactions and the dynamic exchange of ideas. It is these collective thoughts that tend to flourish, evolve and reach their full potential, fueled by a diversity of perspectives and experiences. That is precisely why teamwork stands as one of the most valued pillars of any working environment, and also explains why office workers spend an average of 37% of their time every week sitting in meetings. It’s no surprise then that modern office settings embrace meeting rooms as designated spaces for collaborative ideation and decision-making. But not in the way many might imagine. Gone are the days of bland conference rooms with nothing but a large table, uncomfortable chairs and white walls, giving way to new, more innovative models that respond to a shifting paradigm.

Women Light Artists Explore the Intersection of Space, Technology and Community

In the world of interior design, light serves as an essential medium, but light can also create immersive public spaces. While James Turrell, Olafur Eliasson, and Dan Flavin are celebrated for their transformative mastery of color, reflections, and luminous contrasts, it's crucial to note that the realm of light art isn't exclusively male-dominated. In response to the underrepresentation of female light artists, a refreshing and enlightening perspective emerges from the British lighting designers Sharon Stammers and Martin Lupton of Light Collective.

After founding the platform "Women in Lighting" their book "Women Light Artists," takes a bold step in introducing us to 40 creative women whose work radiates with responsive ingenuity and brilliance. The book offers a captivating spectrum of projects from interactive pools to the play of colorful daylight shadows dancing across a bridge in London, from the peaceful projection onto an iconic Berlin landmark to the vivid rainbow arching above Manhattan's skyline, each work embodies a unique dialogue between light and space. The luminous journey offers a valuable tribute to the power of female artists who, for far too long, have remained in the shadows.

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Cities Light Up in Solidarity with Ukraine

In the realm of media architecture and its role in supporting struggles for social justice, the recent Media Architecture Biennale 2023 (MAB23) in Toronto, Canada, shed light on a captivating aspect: The rapid and vast propagation of solidarity lighting in response to Russia's invasion of Ukraine in 2022. The synchronized illuminations, infused with activism and global art projects, became a powerful emblem of worldwide support for Ukraine during its time of crisis. Two emphatic female political leaders in Europe initiated the lighting solidarity message. Surprisingly, the blue and yellow Ukrainian flag illumination on iconic buildings worldwide defined an image of solidarity even faster in the press than large crowds of people in anti-war protests the weekend after the war began.

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Circles in Interior Design: 27 Projects that Embrace Roundness

Circles, as a fundamental geometric shape, possess a captivating and harmonious quality that has been seamlessly integrated into architecture and design across various eras and styles. From subtle accents to bold focal points, the use of circles in interior design transcends mere ornamentation, often symbolizing continuity, connection, and a soothing visual rhythm. With their endless and unbroken curves, they offer a sense of unity, movement, and balance that can transform spaces into inviting and aesthetically pleasing environments – an effect especially useful for interior design. In this article, we take a look at 27 projects from our ArchDaily database that illustrate circular forms in interiors across the globe.

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How to Improve Natural Lighting in Apartments?

Old and compartmentalized plants, small openings, and lower floors receive scarce natural light. Improving natural lighting in an apartment can be challenging. However, some strategies can help maximize light entry into interiors and bring benefits such as comfort, spaciousness, well-being, and energy savings.

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How Interiors Can Benefit From Indirect Lighting

The importance of lighting in interior design cannot be overstated: done right, it not only accentuates a space's architectural features but also makes inhabitants feel at ease. As Carmelo Zappulla of Lighting Studio External Reference explains in an interview with Architonic, light is a crucial tool to add an emotional element and 'animate a space.'

There are a plethora of artificial lighting options to choose from. Which works best is usually determined by the nature of the interior they're in and the desired spatial effect. One of the most common is indirect lighting. This technique uses fixtures to aim light onto surfaces that act as reflectors, softening the emitted rays to prevent pillar-like, bulky beams in favor of a more evenly distributed glow.

The Use of Light as a Divine Element in 5 Modern Churches

The use of light in religious constructions as an element of association with the divine has been present throughout the history of humanity. Historically, a series of temples from various religions have used this technique as an attempt to visually and perceptibly approach humans to a sacred and intangible dimension. Light is often given a spiritual connotation and significant symbolic force, capable of modifying people's relationships, perceptions, and experiences with their surroundings. Thus, it is an element that has been, and still is, used by architecture to create scenarios and effects in many religious spaces, especially churches.

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What is Human Centric Lighting (HCL)?

From Thomas Edison's empty glass bulb to AI-controlled LEDs, hundreds of years of constant evolution have passed, which culminated in what we now know as artificial lighting. Edison could not have imagined how dependent we would become on his invention almost two centuries later. It led to a way of life where we spend up to 90% of our time in enclosed spaces deprived of natural light, such as shopping centers and offices. Places where artificial light remains constant throughout the day, without any variation of color temperature or luminous intensity are where artificial lighting practically eliminates day and night differences.

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A Tailored Lighting System for Dynamic Interiors

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We are living in an era of active interiors where shifting perimeters, flexible set ups and agile activities are truly testing the limits of design; workspaces are hybrid, retail installations are ever-evolving and cultural spaces are multi-dimensional. Amidst changing scenarios, lighting is key to shaping interior spaces with just the right amount of mood, drama or practical spotlighting. To meet the demands of these cutting-edge interiors, lighting today must provide a solid framework that can embrace both changing dynamics and high quality consistency ​​– offering flexibility, precision control and a timeless aesthetic.

Young Architects Innovate for Better Sleep in Space and (Hopefully) on Earth

Since Yuri Gagarin's iconic pioneering flight in 1961, only 565 human beings have had the privilege of traveling into space. This extreme venture requires a high degree of devotion, extraordinary physical and intellectual preparation, and huge investments. Space exploration has the potential to benefit humanity in many ways, especially regarding the development of new technologies and the generation of scientific knowledge. Many of these technologies are already available to the public, such as GPS, water filters, or highly resistant fabrics. But while we often imagine astronauts floating in space and observing the Earth from a unique vantage point, many of them face the difficulty of sleeping and resting in space due to the lack of natural light. It is this issue that motivated a group of young Danish architects to develop a solution to improve the daily lives of astronauts in space, but also of many people on planet Earth who suffer from the same problem.

Light as Matter: 10 Artists Transform Space with Lighting

Light has been present in art for centuries. To think of the Baroque or Gothic without this element would be impossible. However, in the 20th century, artists began to explore light qualities and transformed them into a means of materializing art. Sculptures, immersive installations, and ways of shaping the environment through light, its colors and intensities brought new spatial perceptions by establishing a unique relationship with architecture.

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