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Informal Settlements: The Latest Architecture and News

A Space Transportation Hub in Japan and a Humanitarian Response in Egypt: 10 Unbuilt Projects Submitted by our Readers

This week’s curated selection of Best Unbuilt Architecture encompasses conceptual proposals submitted by our readers. It features diverse functions and tackles different scales, from a spiraling bridge in China to a transportation hub dedicated primarily to space travel in Japan.

Comprising uncommon design approaches, this article introduces a humanitarian architectural response to the needs of the residents in an informal Egyptian settlement. In the master plan category, a Green city proposal highlights how we should develop our cities and neighborhoods in the future, and the first net-zero energy airport in Mexico reinterprets holistic design approaches. Moreover, the roundup presents different cultural interventions, from a museum in Botswana, an installation at the Burning Man festival by AI Studio, and an observatory in Vietnam.

Archivo Grupo Arca. Image Courtesy of Esrawe StudioMaison ONF. Image Courtesy of Vincent Lavergne Architecture UrbanismeSPACEPORT CITY. Image Courtesy of Noiz ArchitectsThe Tower Flower . Image Courtesy of VHA Architects+ 56

Thousands of Inhabitants May Be Relocated As Chinese Bankers Eye Venezuela's Torre David

Torre de David (the Tower of David) - the world's tallest slum and the subject of Urban-Think Tank, Justin McGuirk, and Iwan Baan's Golden Lion-winning Pavilion at the Venice Biennale 2012 - is once again making headlines. Venezuelan newspaper TalCual reports that the Venezuelan government is in negotiations with Chinese banks interested in purchasing the building.

Tower of David is an unfinished financial skyscraper in downtown Caracas. Construction began on the tower in 1990, but the death of the principal investor in 1993 and the subsequent banking crisis that hit the country in 1994 froze construction; by the end of the year, the tower was in the hands of the state. Nevertheless, in 2007 two thousand homeless citizens took over and inhabited the skyscraper, making it the tallest vertical slum in the world.

© Vía 'The Atlantic'© Vía 'The Atlantic'© Vía 'The Atlantic'© Vía 'The Atlantic'+ 4