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Dario Goodwin

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Spotlight: Christian de Portzamparc

04:30 - 5 May, 2019
Spotlight: Christian de Portzamparc, Philharmonie Luxembourg, Luxembourg. Image © Wade Zimmerman
Philharmonie Luxembourg, Luxembourg. Image © Wade Zimmerman

Born on the 5th of May 1944 in what was at the time the French Protectorate of Morocco, French architect Christian de Portzamparc had doubts about continuing with architecture while studying in the 1960s, questioning modernist ideals and the discipline's lack of freedom compared to art. Instead, he spent a decade attempting to understand the role of architecture, before returning triumphantly with a new model of iterative urban design that emphasized open neighborhoods based around landmark "poles of attraction" and a varied series of high-profile commissions that combine a sense of purpose and place.

The French Embassay, Berlin. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Berlin,_Mitte,_Pariser_Platz,_Botschaft_Frankreich.jpg'>Wikimedia user Jörg Zägel</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> Philharmonie Luxembourg, Luxembourg. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/borkurdotnet/5696828844'>Flickr user borkurdotnet</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> Chateau Cheval Blanc Winer, Saint-Émilion. Image © Erik Saillet La  Musée Hergé, Louvain-la-Neuve. Image © Nicolás Borel + 17

Spotlight: William Pereira

10:30 - 25 April, 2019
Spotlight: William Pereira, Geisel Library. Image © Darren Bradley
Geisel Library. Image © Darren Bradley

Winner of the 1942 Acadamy Award for Best Special Effects, William Pereira (April 25, 1909 – November 13, 1985) also designed some of America's most iconic examples of futurist architecture, with his heavy stripped down functionalism becoming the symbol of many US institutions and cities. Working with his more prolific film-maker brother Hal Pereira, William Pereira's talent as an art director translated into a long and prestigious career creating striking and idiosyncratic buildings across the West Coast of America.

Transamerica Pyramid. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/jkz/6371624443'>Flickr user jkz</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> Thene Building, LAX. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/132084522@N05/16747302728'>Flickr user Sam valadi</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> Jack Langson Library at University of California (Irvine). ImageCourtesy of <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:UCILibrary.jpg'>Wikimedia user TFNorman</a> (public domain) Geisel Library. Image © Darren Bradley + 12

Spotlight: Richard Neutra

11:00 - 8 April, 2019
Spotlight: Richard Neutra, Lovell House, 1929. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Lovell_House,_Los_Angeles,_California.JPG'>Wikimedia user Los Angeles</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>
Lovell House, 1929. Image © Wikimedia user Los Angeles licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

Though Modernism is sometimes criticized for imposing universal rules on different people and areas, it was Richard J. Neutra's (April 8, 1892 – April 16, 1970) intense client focus that won him acclaim. His personalized and flexible version of modernism created a series of private homes that were—and still are—highly sought after, making him one of the United States' most significant mid-century modernists. His architecture of simple geometry and airy steel and glass became the subject of the iconic photographs of Julius Schulman, and came to stand for an entire era of American design.

Miller House, 1938. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/28238346@N00/338006894/'>Flickr user IK's World Trip</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> Cyclorama, Gettsyburg. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Gettysburg_Cyclorama_Neutra_PA3.jpg'>Wikimedia user Acroterion</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> Lovell House, 1929. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/aseles/6149131597'>Flickr user aseles</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-ND 2.0</a> Kaufmann House, 1947. Image © Barbara Alfors 2000 <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Kaufman_House_Palm_Springs.jpg'>via Wikimedia</a? licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> + 7

Spotlight: Kengo Kuma

07:00 - 8 August, 2018
Spotlight: Kengo Kuma, Asakusa Culture and Tourism Center. Image © Takeshi Yamagishi
Asakusa Culture and Tourism Center. Image © Takeshi Yamagishi

Kengo Kuma (born 8th August, 1956) is one of the most significant Japanese figures in contemporary architecture. His reinterpretation of traditional Japanese architectural elements for the 21st century has involved serious innovation in uses of natural materials, new ways of thinking about light and lightness and architecture that enhances rather than dominates. His buildings don't attempt to fade into the surroundings through simple gestures, as some current Japanese work does, but instead his architecture attempts to manipulate traditional elements into statement-making architecture that still draws links with the area in which it's built. These high-tech remixes of traditional elements and influences have proved popular across Japan and beyond, and his recent works have begun expanding out of Japan to China and the West.

Green Cast. Image Courtesy of kengo kuma & associates GC Prostho Museum Research Center. Image © Daici Ano Même – Experimental House. Image Courtesy of kengo kuma & associates Shun Shoku Lounge by Guranavi. Image Courtesy of kengo kuma & associates + 37

Spotlight: Glenn Murcutt

03:00 - 25 July, 2018
Spotlight: Glenn Murcutt, Simpson-Lee House, Mount Wilson (1994). Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/unrosarinoenvietnam/3783824891/'>Flickr user unrosarinoenvietnam</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-NC-SA 2.0</a>
Simpson-Lee House, Mount Wilson (1994). Image © Flickr user unrosarinoenvietnam licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

As an architect, critic and winner of the 2002 Pritzker Prize, Glenn Murcutt, (born 25 July 1936) has designed some of Australia's most innovative and environmentally sensitive buildings over a long career—and yet he still remains a one man office. Despite working on his own, primarily on private residences and exclusively in Australia, his buildings have had a huge influence across the world and his motto of "touch the earth lightly" is internationally recognized as a way to foster harmonious, adaptable structures that work with the surrounding landscape instead of competing with it.

Spotlight: Arata Isozaki

00:30 - 23 July, 2018
Spotlight: Arata Isozaki, Qatar National Convention Centre. Image © Nelson Garrido
Qatar National Convention Centre. Image © Nelson Garrido

Japanese architect, teacher, and theorist Arata Isozaki (born 23 July, 1931) helped bring Japanese influence to some of the most prestigious buildings of the 20th century, and continues to work at the highest level today. Initially working in a distinctive form of modernism, Isozaki developed his own thoughts and theories on architecture into a complex style that invokes pure shape and space as much as it evokes post-modern ideas. Highly adaptable and socially concerned, his work has been acclaimed for being sensitive to context while still making statements of its own.

Qatar National Convention Centre. Image © Nelson Garrido D38 Office. Image © Filippo Poli Ōita Prefectural Library, 1966, now Ōita Art Plaza. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/kentamabuchi/2937896268'>Flickr user kentamabuchi</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> Mito Art Tower. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Mito_Art_Tower.JPG'>Wikimedia user Korall</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> + 9

Spotlight: Buckminster Fuller

07:00 - 12 July, 2018
Spotlight: Buckminster Fuller, Montreal 1967 World's Fair, "Man and His World," Buckminster Fuller's Geodesic Dome With Solar Experimental House, 2012. Image © Jade Doskow
Montreal 1967 World's Fair, "Man and His World," Buckminster Fuller's Geodesic Dome With Solar Experimental House, 2012. Image © Jade Doskow

Pioneering radical Richard Buckminster "Bucky" Fuller (July 12, 1895 – July 1, 1983), an inventor, architect and the second president of Mensa, had a massive impact on the architecture and popular culture of the latter 20th century. Most famous for popularizing the geodesic dome, Fuller is also known as the father of sustainability, and was driven by his intention “to make the world work for 100% of humanity, in the shortest possible time, through spontaneous cooperation without ecological offense or disadvantage of anyone.”

Spotlight: Alison and Peter Smithson

03:00 - 22 June, 2018
The Economist Building. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/seier/5426468934/'>Flickr user seier</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
The Economist Building. Image © Flickr user seier licensed under CC BY 2.0

Wife and husband pair Alison (22 June 1928 – 16 August 1993) and Peter Smithson (18 September 1923 – 3 March 2003) formed a partnership that led British Brutalism through the latter half of the twentieth century. Beginning with a vocabulary of stripped down modernism, the pair were among the first to question and challenge modernist approaches to design and urban planning. Instead, they helped evolve the style into what became Brutalism, becoming proponents of the "streets in the sky" approach to housing.

Robin Hood Gardens. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/stevecadman/2361183115/'>Flickr user stevecadman</a> licensed under <a href=https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> Garden Building, St Hilda's College, Oxford University. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/stevecadman/3414623599/'>Flickr user stevecadman</a> licensed under <a href=https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> The Economist Building. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/seier/5427505450'>Flickr user seier</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> Robin Hood Gardens. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/98115025@N00/3058342144'>Flickr user stevecadman</a> licensed under <a href=https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> + 8

Spotlight: Lúcio Costa

10:30 - 27 February, 2018
Spotlight: Lúcio Costa, The monumental axis central to Costa's plan. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Monumental_axis.jpg'>Wikimedia user Limongi</a> Licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY 3.0</a>
The monumental axis central to Costa's plan. Image © Wikimedia user Limongi Licensed under CC BY 3.0

Brazilian planner, preservationist and modernist thinker Lúcio Costa (27 Feburary 1902 – 13 June 1998) is best known for his 1957 plan of Brasília that shaped the Brazilian capital into a monument to utopian modernism. A resolute and often controversial figure in the Brazilian establishment, Costa’s contributions to Brazilian architecture helped to shape the distinctive modernism that was practically Brazil’s official style until the 1980s.

The original pilot plan. Image Courtesy of O Espaço Lúcio Costa © Imagens AMB The monumental axis central to Costa's plan. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Monumental_axis.jpg'>Wikimedia user Limongi</a> Licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY 3.0</a> The Asa Sul district of Brasília. Image Courtesy of Portal da Copa + 8

Spotlight: Eliel Saarinen

08:00 - 20 August, 2017
Spotlight: Eliel Saarinen, Helsinki Central Railway Station. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Helsinki_Railway_Station_20050604.jpg'>Wikimedia user Revontuli</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>
Helsinki Central Railway Station. Image © Wikimedia user Revontuli licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

Though some may now know him only as the father of Eero Saarinen, Eliel Saarinen (August 20, 1873 – July 1, 1950) was an accomplished and style-defining architect in his own right. His pioneering form of stripped down, vernacular Art Nouveau coincided with stirring Finnish nationalism and a corresponding appetite for a romantic national style and consciousness; his Helsinki Central Station became part of the Finnish identity along with Finnish language theaters and literature. Later moving to America, his city planning and Art Deco designs resonated through western cities in the first half of the 20th century.

Detail from Helsinki Central Station. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/dalbera/2771369126/'>Flickr user dalbera</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> The unbuilt plan for the Tribune Tower. Image Courtesy of Wikimedia (public domain) Finnish Pavillion at the 1900 World's Fair. Image Courtesy of Wikimedia (public domain) National Museum of Finland. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Helsinki_Kansallismuseo_2006.jpg'>Wikimedia user Alessio Damato</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> + 10

Spotlight: Eero Saarinen

06:00 - 20 August, 2017
Spotlight: Eero Saarinen, TWA Terminal. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/samsebeskazal/10283256224/'>Flickr user samsebeskazal</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a>
TWA Terminal. Image © Flickr user samsebeskazal licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

Son of pioneering Finnish architect Eliel Saarinen, Eero Saarinen (August 20, 1910 – September 1, 1961) was not only born on the same day, but carried his father's later rational Art Deco into a neofuturist internationalism, regularly using sweeping curves and abundant glass. Saarinen's simple design motifs allowed him to be incredibly adaptable, turning his talent to furniture design with Charles Eames and producing radically different buildings for different clients. Despite his short career as a result of his young death, Saarinen gained incredible success and plaudits, winning some of the most sought-after commissions of the mid-twentieth century.

North Christian Church, Columbus. Image © Hassan Bagheri TWA Terminal. Image © Cameron Blaylock St Louis Gateway Arch. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/jeffnps/5263761913'>Flickr user jeffnps</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> David S. Ingalls Skating Rink. Image via Wikimedia (public domain) + 15

Spotlight: John Hejduk

04:00 - 19 July, 2017
Wall House II, built 2001 in the Netherlands. Image © Liao Yusheng
Wall House II, built 2001 in the Netherlands. Image © Liao Yusheng

Artist, architect and architectural theorist John Hejduk (19 July 1929 - 3 July 2000) introduced new ways of thinking about space that are still highly influential in both modernist and post-modernist architecture today, especially among the large number of architects who were once his students. Inspired both by darker, gothic themes and modernist thinking on the human psyche, his relatively small collection of built work, and many of his unbuilt plans and drawings, have gone on to inspire other projects and architects around the world. In addition, his drawing, writing and teaching have gone on to shape the meeting of modernist and postmodern influences in contemporary architecture and helped bring psychological approaches to the forefront of design.

Spotlight: Moshe Safdie

10:30 - 14 July, 2017
Habitat 67. Image © Canadian Architecture Collection, McGill University
Habitat 67. Image © Canadian Architecture Collection, McGill University

Theorist, architect, and educator Moshe Safdie (born July 14, 1938), made his first mark on architecture with his master's thesis, where the idea for Habitat 67 originated. Catapulted to attention, Safdie has used his ground-breaking first project to develop a reputation as a prolific creator of cultural buildings, translating his radicalism into a dramatic yet sensitive style that has become popular across the world. Increasingly working in Asia and the Middle East, Safdie puts an emphasis on integrating green and public spaces into his modernist designs.

Plan for Singapore's new "Air Hub". Image Courtesy of Safdie Architects National Medal of Honor Museum in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina. Image Courtesy of Safdie Architects Habitat 67. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Montreal_-_QC_-_Habitat67.jpg'>Wikimedia user Wladyslaw (taxiarchos228)</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, Kansas City. Image © Tim Hursley + 13

Spotlight: Jan Kaplický

06:00 - 18 April, 2017
Spotlight: Jan Kaplický, Selfridges at the Birmingham Bullring Centre, 2003. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/bs0u10e0/6837495909'>Flickr user Bs0u10e0</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a>
Selfridges at the Birmingham Bullring Centre, 2003. Image © Flickr user Bs0u10e0 licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

Radical neofuturist architect Jan Kaplický (18 April 1937 – 14 January 2009) was the son of a sculptor and a botanical illustrator, and appropriately spent his career creating highly sculptural and organic forms. Working with partner Amanda Levete at his suitably-named practice Future Systems, Kaplický was catapulted to fame after his sensationally avant-garde 1999 Lord's Cricket Ground Media Centre and became a truly innovative icon of avant-garde architecture.

Spotlight: Mario Botta

12:00 - 1 April, 2017
Spotlight: Mario Botta, Cathédrale d'Evry (Essonne-France). Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/tongeron91/8674923860/'>Flickr user tongeron91</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a>
Cathédrale d'Evry (Essonne-France). Image © Flickr user tongeron91 licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

Working since he was 16, Swiss architect Mario Botta (April 1, 1943) has become a prolific and well known crafter of space, designing a huge array of places of worship, private homes, and museums, perhaps most notably the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and the Church of San Giovanni Battista in Mogno, Switzerland. His use of traditional masonry over the streamlined steel and glass of so much modern architecture creates strong, self-confident buildings that pull together the contrast between the weight of his materials and lightness of his designs.

Spotlight: Marcel Breuer

08:00 - 22 May, 2016
Spotlight: Marcel Breuer , St John's Abbey, Minnesota,1961. Image © Flickr user janmikeuy licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0
St John's Abbey, Minnesota,1961. Image © Flickr user janmikeuy licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

Known as Lajkó to his friends, Marcel Lajos Breuer (21 May 1902 – 1 July 1981) helped define first the interior contents, then the form, of the modernist house for millions; his influential approach to housing was one of the first to demonstrate modernism on a domestic, practical level. Beginning as a furniture designer at the height of Bauhaus, Breuer was hailed as one of the most innovative designers working in the 1930s, before moving to architecture and helping define the modernist vernacular—most notably as one of America's foremost Brutalist architects.

Want to Work Internationally? Here's What You Need to Know About Copyright

09:30 - 31 August, 2015
Want to Work Internationally? Here's What You Need to Know About Copyright, Zaha Hadid's Wangjing SOHO in Beijing, which has allegedly been copied by a developer in Chongqing. Image ©  ZHA
Zaha Hadid's Wangjing SOHO in Beijing, which has allegedly been copied by a developer in Chongqing. Image © ZHA

Ideas are precious, precious things. A good one can upend a movement or make a career and they are, of course, worth a great deal. Architects live in a competitive globalized world, and in the race to succeed, defining who owns ideas is becoming increasingly important in an architect's professional life. ArchDaily has previously explained the essential points of architectural copyright and explored the complexities of legal judgments, but what if you want to work internationally? It's a much more complex issue than "China will let people copy what they want" or "Belgians will sue you" and if you want to work outside your home country then it's essential you understand the variables.

Fortunately, we've got you covered: we've pulled together a rundown of the essentials of copyright law and practice in some of the most popular countries to find work - read on for more.

Self-Aware Nanobots Form Futurist Megastructures in this Thesis Project from the AA

09:30 - 16 August, 2015
Self-Aware Nanobots Form Futurist Megastructures in this Thesis Project from the AA, Courtesy of Dmytro Aranchii
Courtesy of Dmytro Aranchii

Architecture is a swarm, and a self aware one at that. That's the vision presented by noMad: a built environment made of Buckminster Fuller-like geometric structures that compile themselves entirely autonomously, according to data gathered and processed by the units. Developed by Architectural Association students Dmytro Aranchii, Paul Bart, Yuqiu Jiang, and Flavia Santos, on a basic level noMad's concept is fairly simple - a small unit of motors that is attached to several magnetic faces, which can be reoriented into different shapes. Put multiple units together, however, and noMad's vision becomes an entirely new form of architecture: non-finite, mobile and infinitely adaptable.

Courtesy of Dmytro Aranchii Courtesy of Dmytro Aranchii Courtesy of Dmytro Aranchii Courtesy of Dmytro Aranchii + 21