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From Seville to San Francisco: 3 Pelli Clarke Pelli Projects in Progress

US firm Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects is renowned for their iconic and sustainable designs, having won numerous awards, including the AIA’s Firm Award. They currently have several projects under construction, ranging from a transit center in San Francisco to an office and retail tower in Seville, Spain. Read on after the break for an overview of three of their current projects, all in various states of completion.

Beacons of Pride: #LoveWins in These Illuminated Buildings

San Francisco City Hall illuminated in rainbow colors in honor of Pride Week Image © Nickolay Stanev via Shutterstock.com
San Francisco City Hall illuminated in rainbow colors in honor of Pride Week Image © Nickolay Stanev via Shutterstock.com

Earlier today, the US Supreme Court ruled that same-sex marriage should be legal in all 50 states, effectively overruling 14 states that so far have continued to enforce a ban (if you've been on Facebook in the last few hours, you've probably already heard). The ruling comes just in time for Pride Parades which will take place this weekend in many cities, and to celebrate this historic decision, we've rounded up some iconic buildings lit up for past Pride Parades for everybody to enjoy - equally.

Goettsch Partners Design 605-Foot "Park Tower" for San Francisco

Goettsch Partners (GP) has been commissioned to design a 605-foot-tall "Park Tower" for San Francisco. Planned to rise in the SOMA district, on the corner of Howard and Beale streets, across from the new Transbay Transit Center, the new building will feature a variety of office space, flanked by a series of outdoor terraces - "mini-parks in the sky," hence the tower's name. 

Coffee Bar Kearny / jones | haydu

  • Architects: jones | haydu
  • Location: San Francisco, CA, USA
  • Project Year: 2015
  • Photographs: Art Gray

© Art Gray © Art Gray © Art Gray © Art Gray

SHoP Unveils Plans for New Uber Headquarters in San Francisco

SHoP Architects and Studio O+A have unveiled designs for a new Uber headquarters in San Francisco. Planned to rise on a 14-acre vacant site in the city's Mission Bay neighborhood, the 423,000 square-foot scheme will consist of two towers: an 11‐story tower at 1455 Third Street and a 6‐story structure at 1515 Third Street.

© SHoP Architects © SHoP Architects © SHoP Architects © SHoP Architects

4 Ways Cold-Climate Cities Can Make The Most Of Their Waterfronts

Urban waterfronts have historically been the center of activity for many cities. They began as economic, transportation and manufacturing hubs, but as most industries changed their shipping patterns and consolidated port facilities, many industrial waterfronts became obsolete. In Europe, smaller historic ports were easily converted to be reused for leisure activities. However, in North America, where the ports were larger, it was more difficult to convert the waterfronts due to logistical and contamination issues.

Over the past 40 years or so, architects and urban planners have started to recognize the redevelopment potential for waterfronts across the United States and Canada, and the impact they can have on the financial and social success of cities. Though cold-climate cities pose a unique challenge for waterfront development, with effective planning waterfront cities with freezing winter months can still take advantage of the spaces year-round.

Chaudière Island project in Ottawa. Image © Chris Foyd courtesy of Perkins+Will Lower Yonge project in Toronto. Image © Chris Foyd courtesy of Perkins+Will Solar study for Lower Yonge project in Toronto. Image © Chris Foyd courtesy of Perkins+Will Lower Yonge project in Toronto. Image © Chris Foyd courtesy of Perkins+Will

Container House / José Schreiber Arquitecto

© Ramiro Sosa © Ramiro Sosa © Ramiro Sosa © Ramiro Sosa

Linear House / Roberto Benito

  • Architects: Roberto Benito
  • Location: San Francisco, Cordoba, Argentina
  • Interiors: Nancy Silvestro
  • Project Area: 277.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2012
  • Photographs: Gonzalo Viramonte

© Gonzalo Viramonte © Gonzalo Viramonte © Gonzalo Viramonte © Gonzalo Viramonte

Suburban Dwelling / Roberto Benito

© Gonzalo Viramonte © Gonzalo Viramonte © Gonzalo Viramonte © Gonzalo Viramonte

George Lucas Unveils Plan for Bay Area's Largest Affordable Housing Project

What some believe to be an act of revenge, George Lucas has unveiled plans to build the San Francisco Bay Area's largest affordable housing project in the wealthy community of Marin County. As CBS reports, the news comes just three years after valley residents shot down Lucas' proposal to develop the land with a 265,000-square-foot production studio. The new plan aims to provide veterans, firefighters, teachers and other service-oriented working class people with 224 low-income homes. 

"We’ve got enough millionaires here. What we need is some houses for regular working people," said Lucas, according to his lawyer Gary Giacomini who also ensured that the plan was "not a form of retaliation."

Vincent Laforet Captures San Francisco From Above

Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer Vincent Laforet has made his way to San Francisco as part three of his dizzying series of city aerials. Capturing the tightly packed metropolis from 7,200-feet, Laforet became mesmerized by the city’s “clashing grids,” stunning bridges and overwhelming feeling of “peace and order.”

“There’s just something about this city’s vibe - a perfect balance between the hectic go-getter pace of New York and the more relaxed, laissez-faire rhythm of Los Angeles,” says Laforet. “It feels like every little piece of the puzzle has somehow found its place in what is an absolutely chaotic topography.”

See a selection of Laforet’s San Francisco series, after the break. 

© Vincent Laforet © Vincent Laforet © Vincent Laforet © Vincent Laforet

SteelHouse 1 and 2 / Zack | de Vito Architecture

© Bruce Damonte © Bruce Damonte © Bruce Damonte © Paul Dyer

300 Ivy Street / David Baker Architects

© Bruce Damonte © Bruce Damonte © Bruce Damonte © Bruce Damonte

The Nature Conservancy HQ / MKThink

  • Architects: MKThink
  • Location: San Francisco, CA, USA
  • Project Mangement: Studley
  • Contractor: GCI
  • Area: 16200.0 ft2
  • Project Year: 2014
  • Photographs: Cesar Rubio

© Cesar Rubio © Cesar Rubio © Cesar Rubio © Cesar Rubio

California Breaks Ground on America’s First High Speed Rail

California has broke ground on America’s first high-speed rail line in Fresno, six years after voters first approved an almost $10 billion bond act to fund the project. However, along with celebrations comes skepticism; according to an NPR report, fears of the project’s failure have risen due to the rail line only having a fifth of its funding and that its nearly three-hour journey will still take longer than a flight connecting Los Angeles to San Francisco. Despite this, supporters are optimistic that the line will be up and running by 2030. The state will be relying on private investment and revenue from the state’s greenhouse-gas fees to secure the remaining $55 billion needed to complete the $68 billion project. 

North Beach Branch Library / LMS Architects

  • Architects: Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects
  • Location: North Beach, San Francisco, CA, USA
  • Area: 8500.0 ft2
  • Project Year: 2014
  • Photographs: Courtesy of LMS Architects

Courtesy of LMS Architects Courtesy of LMS Architects Courtesy of LMS Architects Courtesy of LMS Architects

Laguna Street Residence / Michael Hennessey Architecture

© Joe Fletcher © Joe Fletcher © Joe Fletcher © Joe Fletcher