Infographic: The Bauhaus, Where Form Follows Function

UPDATE: In honor of the 81st anniversary of the day the closed in 1933, we’re re-publishing this popular infographic, which was originally published April 16th, 2012.

From the “starchitect” to “architecture for the 99%,” we are witnessing a shift of focus in the field of architecture. However, it’s in the education system where these ideas really take root and grow. This sea change inspired us to explore past movements, influenced by economic shifts, war and the introduction of new technologies, and take a closer look at the bauhaus movement.

Often associated with being anti-industrial, the Arts and Crafts Movement had dominated the field before the start of the Bauhaus in 1919. The Bauhaus’ focus was to merge design with industry, providing well designed products for the many.

The Bauhaus not only impacted design and architecture on an international level, but also revolutionized the way design schools conceptualize education as a means of imparting an integrated design approach where form follows function.

AD Classics: Ariston Hotel / Marcel Breuer

Courtesy of Plataforma Arquitectura

Located in the La Serena neighborhood of , Argentina, the well-known yet now abandoned Ariston Hotel was designed and constructed in 1948 by the Hungarian architect Marcel Breuer, a great diffuser of the modern movement in architecture. Originally meant for housing social reunions, dances and cocktail parties, this project is notable for its elevated volume with a curving, clover-inspired form that permits maximum glazing.

Modern Tide: Midcentury Architecture on Long Island

The relationship between social dynamics and architecture has always been intimate.  It is a constant dialogue between social norms and politics, stylistic trends and aesthetic choices, individual preferences and the collective good.  The Modernist Period was a time when architecture took on the challenge of many social problems.  In all the arts –  architecture, design, music and film – the period was highly politicized and the choices often gave way to a utilitarian ideal that was a hybrid of efficiency, simplicity and comfort.  Jake Gorst’s new film Modern Tide: Midcentury Architecture on Long Island, supported by Design Onscreen, is a message of that takes us through the history of the modernist housing boom that took place on Long Island, NY in the period between the Great Depression and the 1970s.

On August 14th, Cook+Fox Architects hosted a private film screening at their office on 641 Ave of the Americas, presenting the treasures along the island’s shore that have fallen between the cracks of history.  The film looks at works from , Wallace Harrison, Frank Lloyd Wright, Marcel Breuer, Philip Johnson, Charles Gwathmey, Barbara and Julian Neski and many others.

Follow us after the break to catch up on the history of the development of these houses on Long Island.

AD Classics: St. John’s Abbey Church / Marcel Breuer

Photo by janmikeuy – http://www.flickr.com/photos/janmikeuy/

Saint John’s Abbey Church was designed by the renowned Hungarian architect . This cast-in-place concrete marvel is a stepping-stone in modern design of religious architecture in the . One must admire the great concrete trees that support the ceiling and the dominant bell banner that shields the church. More after the break.

Syracuse University Unveils First Phase of Marcel Breuer Digital Archive

Whitney Museum of American Art / Architect: Marcel Breuer and Hamilton Smith, Architects; Michael H. Irving, Consulting Architect

Marcel Breuer, born in Hungary in 1902, was educated under the manifesto of “total construction”; this is likely why Breuer is well known for both his furniture designs as well as his numerous works of architecture, which ranged from small residences to monumental architecture and governmental buildings. His career flourished during the Modernist period in conjunction with architects and designers such as founder of Walter GropiusLe Corbusier and Mies van der Rohe.

In 2009, ’s Special Collection Research Center recieved a National Endowment for the Humanities grant with which it began creating the Marcel Breuer Digital Archive. The digital archive, available online, is a collaborative effort headed by the library and includes institutions such as the Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin, the Stiftung Bauhaus Dessau, the Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich, Harvard University, the Archives of American Art at the Smithsonian Institution, the University of East Anglia, and the Vitra Design Museum. It is in the first phase, which includes Breuer work up until 1955, of digitzing over 30,000 drawings, photographs, letters and other related material of his work.

More about Marcel Breuer’s career and the archive after the break.

Classics modeled with ArchiCAD15

YouTube Preview Image

Last week we told you about ArchiCAD 15, Graphisoft’s latest version of its premium design software for architects. Although you can see many videos showing the new features of the software, it’s great to see some projects modeled with ArchiCAD 15. Specially if we can see some of the projects we have featured in our AD Classics section, like SOM’s USAFA Cadet Chapel or William Van Alen’s Chrysler Building. Check the other two videos after the break.

AD Classics: Whitney Museum / Marcel Breuer

Fred Conrad, © New York Times

Containing one of the most reputable collections of American art from the 20 and 21st centuries, the designed by Bauhaus-trained architect Marcel Breuer is an easily recognizable landmark of . It is known for emphasizing exhibitions of work of living artists while also maintaining an extensive permanent collection of other important pieces from the first half of the century.

More on the Whitney Musuem by Marcel Breuer after the break.

Architecture City Guide: Atlanta

This week the Architecture City Guide series heads south to warm up a bit, featuring . We’re looking forward to hearing from you, what are your can’t miss buildings? Add them to the comment section below.

Follow the break for our Atlanta list and a corresponding map!

Architecture City Guide: New York City

© flickr: nickmilleruk

The Architecture City Guide series is back, this week featuring .  Grab a scarf and hat and hit the streets to check out some of the great architecture that NYC has to offer.  Think we left something out?  Add your can’t miss NYC buildings to our comments below.

Follow the break for our City list and a corresponding map!