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How Migration Will Define the Future of Urbanism and Architecture

11:20 - 5 July, 2016
How Migration Will Define the Future of Urbanism and Architecture, The entrance to the Forum Karlín during reSITE 2016. Image © Dorota Velek
The entrance to the Forum Karlín during reSITE 2016. Image © Dorota Velek

When we started talking about migration [as a conference theme], everybody said ‘don’t do it, it’s too controversial.’ We said that’s exactly why we’re going to do it.

This defiant attitude was how Martin Barry, Chairman of reSITE, opened their 2016 Conference in Prague three weeks ago. Entitled “Cities in Migration,” the conference took place against a background of an almost uncountable number of challenging political issues related to migration. In Europe, the unfolding Syrian refugee crisis has strained both political and race relations across the continent; in America, Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump has led a populist knee-jerk reaction against both Mexicans and Muslims; and in the United Kingdom—a country only on the periphery of most attendees’ consciousness at the time—the decision in favor of “Brexit” that took place a week after the conference was largely predicated upon limiting the immigration of not only Syrians, but also of European citizens from other, less wealthy EU countries.

In architecture, such issues have been highlighted this year by Alejandro Aravena’s Venice Biennale, with architects “Reporting from the Front” in battles against, among other things, these migration-related challenges. From refugee camps to slums to housing crises in rich global cities, the message is clear: migration is a topic that architects must understand and respond to. As a result, the lessons shared during reSITE’s intensive two-day event will undoubtedly be invaluable to the architectural profession.

Herzog & de Meuron’s Proposal to Transform Historic New York Townhouses Receives Approval

08:00 - 23 June, 2016
Herzog & de Meuron’s Proposal to Transform Historic New York Townhouses Receives Approval , Courtesy of The New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission and Stephen Wang + Associates PLLC
Courtesy of The New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission and Stephen Wang + Associates PLLC

The New York Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) has approved Stephen Wang + Associates and Herzog & de Meuron’s townhouse transformation project on New York’s Upper East Side.

Located at 15 East and 75th Street, the project entails combining three separate townhomes -- two Queen Anne-style, and one Neo-Federal -- into one large home for Russian billionaire Roman Abramovich.

2016 Kiesler Architecture and Art Prize Awarded to Andrés Jaque

10:00 - 17 June, 2016
2016 Kiesler Architecture and Art Prize Awarded to Andrés Jaque, COSMO (MoMA PS1). Image © Miguel de Guzmán
COSMO (MoMA PS1). Image © Miguel de Guzmán

Spanish, New York-based architect Andrés Jaque (Office for Political Innovation) has been awarded the 10th Kiesler Architecture and Art Prize by the Mayor of Vienna, citing Jaque’s "capacity to go beyond assumptions about traditional practice and urban life." In 2015 Jaque was declared the MoMA PS1 YAP (Young Architects Programme) winner for COSMO – a complex, and beautiful, water purifying prototype that has been installed in Brooklyn. He and his office are also collaborating with Mark Wigley and Beatriz Colomina on the design for the upcoming Istanbul Design Biennial, Are We Human?

AD Classics: TWA Flight Center / Eero Saarinen

04:00 - 13 June, 2016
AD Classics: TWA Flight Center / Eero Saarinen, © Cameron Blaylock
© Cameron Blaylock

Built in the early days of airline travel, the TWA Terminal is a concrete symbol of the rapid technological transformations which were fueled by the outset of the Second World War. Eero Saarinen sought to capture the sensation of flight in all aspects of the building, from a fluid and open interior, to the wing-like concrete shell of the roof. At TWA’s behest, Saarinen designed more than a functional terminal; he designed a monument to the airline and to aviation itself.

This AD Classic features a series of exclusive images by Cameron Blaylock, photographed in May 2016. Blaylock used a Contax camera and Zeiss lenses with Rollei black and white film to reflect camera technology of the 1960s.

© Cameron Blaylock © Cameron Blaylock © Cameron Blaylock © Cameron Blaylock +26

Behind the Scenes: Building the American Copper Buildings' Skybridge

12:00 - 12 June, 2016

A new video by JDS Development Group, Building Knowhow: Skybridge, begins with an anecdote of a day when the firemen showed up at the site. “We got a call – the buildings are falling down!” the chief fireman told Michael Jones, director of JDS. Jones responded with a chuckle, "they're supposed to be like that!"

Located on the East Side of Manhattan, the American Copper Buildings, designed by New York-based SHoP Architects, test the boundaries of engineering. In an informative video, JDS Development Group documents the building of a skybridge between the towers, outlining their detail-oriented, step-by-step approach. Located 300 feet in the air, it is New York's first major skybridge in 80 years.

WXY Releases Plans for 50 Acre Public Space Stretch in Brooklyn

08:00 - 16 May, 2016
WXY Releases Plans for 50 Acre Public Space Stretch in Brooklyn, Courtesy of WXY
Courtesy of WXY

Design firm WXY architecture + urban design has released plans for a reconnection of nearly 50 acres of public space between downtown Brooklyn and the Brooklyn Bridge in New York. Called The Brooklyn Strand, the project seeks to create a more appealing and accessible waterfront, while transforming the quality of public space in the area.

Louis Kahn's Roosevelt Island Memorial in the Firing Line Over Accessibility Dispute

16:00 - 15 May, 2016
Louis Kahn's Roosevelt Island Memorial in the Firing Line Over Accessibility Dispute, Courtesy of Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park, LLC
Courtesy of Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park, LLC

Throughout the four years since the opening of the Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park on Roosevelt Island, New York City Hall has been arguing with the nonprofit group, the Four Freedoms Park Conservancy, over whether the park is adequately accessible to disabled people, reports The New York Times.

The park was designed from 1972 to 1974—before the advent of the American With Disabilities Act of 1990—by architect Louis Kahn, who died in Pennsylvania Station carrying the plans for the finished memorial. At its southernmost end the park features a 12-by-60-foot sunken terrace that, ironically, President Roosevelt himself would not have been able to use with his wheelchair.

Micro-Apartments: Are Expanding Tables and Folding Furniture a Solution to Inequality?

04:00 - 10 May, 2016
Micro-Apartments: Are Expanding Tables and Folding Furniture a Solution to Inequality?, Carmel Place, New York City. Courtesy of nARCHITECTS. Image © Field Condition
Carmel Place, New York City. Courtesy of nARCHITECTS. Image © Field Condition

This opinion-piece is a response to Nick Axel’s essay Cloud Urbanism: Towards a Redistribution of Spatial Value, published on ArchDaily as part of our partnership with Volume.

In his recent article, Nick Axel puts forward a compelling argument for the (re)distribution of city-space according to use value: kickball trophies and absentee owners out, efficient use of space in. Distributing urban space according to use certainly makes sense. Along with unoccupied luxury condos that are nothing more than assets to the 1% and mostly empty vacation apartments, expelling (rarely accessed) back-closets to the suburbs frees more of the limited space in cities for people to actually live in.

Arch Out Loud Announces Winners of New York City Aquarium Competition

16:00 - 8 May, 2016
Aquatrium. Image via Arch Out Loud
Aquatrium. Image via Arch Out Loud

Arch Out Loud has announced the winners of their New York City Aquarium and Public Waterfront Competition, which invited students and professionals alike to design "an intertwined public aquarium and park" on an underutilized riverfront property located on the East River in Queens. Participants were asked to “redefine the aquarium typology, examining its relationship to the urban context and the public domain.” 

The call for submissions was answered by 556 participants and 178 proposals from forty counties, and included ideas that pushed the physical boundaries of the site and responded to the idea of redefining the typical aquarium typology.

Breaking Down the Cost of Calatrava’s World Trade Center Oculus

08:00 - 2 May, 2016
Breaking Down the Cost of Calatrava’s World Trade Center Oculus, via The Real Deal
via The Real Deal

Twelve years after Santiago Calatrava revealed his design for the World Trade Center Oculus, the PATH station finally opened to the public in March. Although not officially confirmed by the Port Authority, the total cost of the Oculus is estimated to be nearly four billion dollars - almost double the original budget. The Real Deal has broken down the big-ticket costs that went into the making of the Oculus.

Gallery: Santiago Calatrava's WTC Transportation Hub Photographed by Laurian Ghinitoiu

11:00 - 1 May, 2016
Gallery: Santiago Calatrava's WTC Transportation Hub Photographed by Laurian Ghinitoiu, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

Since it opened to the public two months ago, Santiago Calatrava's World Trade Center Transportation Hub has been the subject of intense debate. Critics and the public alike have tried to answer whether the building, while undeniably unique and striking, was worth the $4 billion price tag that made it the world's most expensive train station. Key to this question's answer will be the way that the building settles into its role as a piece of the city's fabric.

With construction work still surrounding the building - both on the site itself and at the nearby skyscrapers - photographer Laurian Ghinitoiu turned his camera lens onto the station to see how it has been absorbed into the life of the city, capturing the way the structure is revealed from unexpected vantage points and showing how its users react to the sublime internal space of the "oculus."

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu +30

Call for Entries: How To Architecture!

10:15 - 25 April, 2016
Call for Entries: How To Architecture!, HOW TO ARCHITECTURE!
HOW TO ARCHITECTURE!

How To Architecture! is a design competition which invites students to reflect on contemporary culture and to do it with architecture. Leafing through headlines, lists, captions, zooming in and out of feeds, bold fonts, and articles made of images: we participate in the age of the listicle. Culture flashes before us—an extension of ourselves: the superabundant reel. As the cycle of consumption whirs on, architecture still stands. What does architecture say; how does it feed you? Tell us what you think! Tell us

Bjarke Ingels on Sculptural Skyscrapers and Refining Parameters in High Rise Design

07:30 - 18 April, 2016

In an interview with the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH), Bjarke Ingels reflects on the design of skyscrapers, noting how "sculpture is fine, but if its arbitrary it's not as interesting." Architects, Ingels argues, have the problem of "skilled incompetence:" the notion that they "already know the answer before [they've] even heard the question." This prevents them "from questioning the question, or having the question rephrased, or elaborating on the question, or even listening for the question – because [they] already know the answer."

Gallery: BIG's VIA 57WEST Photographed by Laurian Ghinitoiu

16:00 - 7 April, 2016
VIA 57WEST / BIG. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
VIA 57WEST / BIG. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

Photographer Laurian Ghinitoiu has captured the latest photos of BIG's courtscraper, VIA 57WEST. Exploring the urban context of this unconventional high-rise, the images illustrate how the building's swooping facade and peak appear from different sight lines.

For more on BIG's courtscraper and the firm's boundary-pushing design philosophy, check out this New York Times video or this gallery of under-construction photos

Watch the Pritzker Laureates' Conversation Live Today (6:30pm ET)

10:30 - 5 April, 2016

Tonight, the "Pritzker Laureates' Conversation"—titled Challenges Ahead for the Built Environment—will be broadcast live at 6.30pm ET. It will provide a rare opportunity to hear 2016 Pritzker Laureate Alejandro Aravena in conversation with previous Pritzker Prize Laureates, including Richard Meier, Glenn Murcutt, Jean Nouvel, Renzo PianoChristian de Portzamparc, Richard Rogers, and Wang Shu. The conversation will be moderated by Cathleen McGuigan.

Watch the Pritzker Prize Award Ceremony Honoring Alejandro Aravena Live Today (7.30pm ET)

10:00 - 4 April, 2016

Tonight the Pritzker Prize will hold its annual award ceremony, this year honoring the work of 2016 Laureate Alejandro Aravena, who is also directing this year's Venice Architecture Biennale. The ceremony is being broadcast from the United Nations Headquarters in New York City. Make sure to catch the event live right here, tonight at 7.30pm Eastern Time (4.30pm PDT, 12.30am GMT, 1.30 am CET, 7.30am HKT).

Cloud Urbanism: Towards a Redistribution of Spatial Value

04:00 - 21 March, 2016
Cloud Urbanism: Towards a Redistribution of Spatial Value, A billboard advertisement for Manhattan Mini-Storage. The green background and mention of “the cloud” is a direct reference to MakeSpace. Image via Business Insider, MakeSpace
A billboard advertisement for Manhattan Mini-Storage. The green background and mention of “the cloud” is a direct reference to MakeSpace. Image via Business Insider, MakeSpace

Volume Magazine in advance of their 47th issue, The System*.

Two recent trends have recently emerged from the United States’ real estate market that pick up on societal transformations in the way architecture and the city is inhabited. If synchronized, they stand to alter the principles under-riding contemporary logics of urban development. They do so by embodying an alternative system of values, framing its spatial articulation as a critical design project. The purpose of this short text is to present the two trends next to one another, evaluate the prospects of their synchronization, and speculate toward the future they potentiate in unison.

If You Haven't Seen Calatrava's World Trade Center Oculus In Person, This is Pretty Darn Close

14:00 - 10 March, 2016

If you haven't had the opportunity to step inside Santiago Calatrava's World Trade Center Oculus, here is your chance. Miguel de Guzmán of Imagen Subliminal has captured the incredible space in VR (Virtual Reality), granting you 360-degree views of the infamous oculus. Put on your Google Cardboard and see it for yourself